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Full text of "The Maryland Magazine"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marymaga34univ 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



ma^azmo 




Volume XXXIV Number One • January-February 1962 



'M" Club Banquet • At the Berlin Wall • Maryland Books and Authors 



At Bell Telephone Laboratories, mathematician Sidney Darlington 
has contributed notably in developing the art of circuit analysis. 




. . . It is essentially a thing of the mind for it works through concepts, symbols and 
relationships . . .it helps man to analyze and synthesize the complex phenomena of the 
universe and himself . . .it ivorks in many ways to advance electrical communications : 



IT IS CALLED MATHEMATICS 

At Bell Telephone Laboratories, mathematics 
works powerfully to solve problems involving com- 
plex data. Intriguingly, too, the mathematical ap- 
proach: led to the invention of the electric wave 
filter . . . disclosed a kind of wave transmission 
which may some day carry huge amounts of infor- 
mation in waveguide systems . . . foretold the feasi- 
bility of modern quality control . . . led to a scientific 



technique for determining how many circuits must 
be provided for good service without having costly 
equipment lie idle. 

For each creative task, Bell Laboratories utilizes 
whatever serves best— mathematical analysis, labora- 
tory experimentation, simulation with electronic com- 
puters. Together they assure the economical advance- 
ment of all Bell System communications services. 



M. BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




the 




magazine; 



IVTajrylanci 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIV Number 1 

The Cover: When alumni visit the campus at College Park they should 
make a special point to inspect the Maryland Room. The Maryland Room 
has become an important repository and display area for items ol historical 
interest concerning Maryland and Marylanders. The Room is located on 
the fourth floor of the McKeldin Library where alumni will be welcomed 
and made to feel at home by Mrs. Harold Hayes, Head. Mrs. Hayes will be 
pleased to introduce alumni to early works of Maryland fiction, material 
from the earliest University archives, and published information relating 
to modern-day Maryland. A cordial open invitation is extended to Univer- 
sity alumni to visit and use this outstanding library. 



Z* The Alumni Diary 

D Alumni and Campus Notes 

At the Berlin Wall 



10 



Maryland Books and Authors 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C.WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMN I ASSO CIAT ION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. EDNA L. MESSERSCHMIDT , Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



A DVERTISING D IRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3,1879.-$3.00peryear-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council 
school and college 

REPRESENTA Tl VES : 

AGRICULTURE 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbrealh. '39 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 

ARTS h SCIENCES 

Richard Bourne, '57 
Joseph M. Mathias. '35 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt. '14 

hi - l N E S S » PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr.. '43 
Egbert F. Tingley. '27 
Chester W. Tawney. '3 1 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup. '32 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 

Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 

Harry Hasslinger, '33 

Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Tracy C. Coleman. '35 
Ben Dyer, '31 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman. '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 



Emory H. Niles, '17 

Hon. VV. Albert Menchine. '29 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., '35 
Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Kathryn Prokop Donnelly. '48 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EXOFFICIO MEMBERS: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Field Secretary 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

Nurs., '47; Edu., '51 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
Col. (). H. Saunders, '10. Past President 
Dr. Albeit E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17. Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29. Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19. Past President 



ALUMNI ( l.l.'H REPRESENTATIVES : 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Frederick County — 

Nelson R. Bohn, '51 
"M" Club — Cieorge Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall. '3 1 
New York— Harold McGay. '50 
Prince Georges County — 

I )i . John W. Cronin, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, 19 
I S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

Carson S. ( ouchman. '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



I won't SAY I wasn't proud ... IN FACT, I WAS A LITTLE on the egotistical 
side and feeling much too important. The speaker had just paid a tribute to 
some ten million college and university alumni in this Country. He was talking 
about me when he said alumni hold in their charge the great forces of influence 
which both control and inspire public action. I had already convinced myself 
that alumni are the ones who guarantee adherence to basic truths, while at the 
same time controlling the extent of man's inquiry into the unknown. 

Then came the blow . . . the speaker quoted from Winston Churchill and 
immediately took me back to the personal experience of hearing that momentous 
address at Fulton, Missouri in 1946. At that time, I was more concerned with 
adjustments to my camera to assure a good picture of the Prime Minister of 
Great Britain and the President of the United States as they appeared together 
in this small mid-western college town. Just as though someone knew I had 
missed the on-the-spot impact of Churchill's profound expression embracing 
hope, fear and the challenge of our times, it was now repeated for my benefit. 
Those prophetic words were "The Stone Age may well return on the shining 
wings of science." 

This sobering thought must make all of us realize that the gift of education 
is, in the same breath, the greatest responsibility and the greatest blessing a man 
can have. As we view the ever-increasing pressure for college admission, we 
begin to place true value upon the opportunity to discover new knowledge and to 
revamp the old. We realize again how important the individual mind is and must 
be in the present struggle between two great societies with divergent philosophies. 
Education in our time must continue to excite us and to develop the best in each 
of us if our society is to emerge successfully in this struggle. 

Recently Dr. Ralph Sockman addressed the Advertising Club of Baltimore 
at a Good Will luncheon. The hundreds who were present were men of influence 
representing many alumni groups. Most had the advantage and opportunity which 
comes with advanced education. Even though they were men of divergent na- 
tionalities and religious conviction, they indicated their respect to the speaker, 
who obviously combined great vision with formal education when he said "There 
is something inside of us greater than anything in our power to create outside 
of us." 

Only as we lay hold of knowledge available to us can we unveil the true 
potential of man in his desperate struggle to survive, to grow, and to enjoy the 
revelations that only knowledge can permit. 

Yes, there is justifiable pride in being an alumnus, but there is even greater 
satisfaction in enabling others to earn and wear the same mantle. 



Sincerely, 




^2^C_^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



FEBRUARY 

5-9 Spring Semester Registration 
8 S.U. Classical Film Series: 

Four Bags Full 
12 Instructions Begin 
22 Washington's Birthday, Holiday 
28 S.U. Cultural Series: 

The Population Explosion 



MARCH 

1-3 Basketball, ACC Tournament. 
Away 

8 S.U. Classical Film Scries: 
Devil in the Flesh 

14 S.U. Cultural Series: 

A Program on Space Exploration 
25 Maryland Day 



APRIL 

4 S.U. Cultural Series: 

An Author's Party 
12 S.U. Classical Film Series: 

Rocket from Calabucfa 
19 Faster Recess Begins Alter 

Class 

24 Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

25 S.U. Cultural Series: 

A Program on the Arts 



I .1st 



University is Now 1 3th Largest in Nation 



A TOTAL ENROLLMENT OF 24,386 STUDENTS, INCLUDING 
full and part-time students and professional school stu- 
dents, has made the University of Maryland the thirteenth 
largest accredited university in the United States. 

The 42nd annual enrollment survey for School and So- 
ciety, national educational journal, was conducted by Dr. 
Garland G. Parker, Registrar and Central Admissions Officer 
for the University of Cincinnati. 

The survey revealed that national collegiate attendance, as 
recorded this fall in 1,047 accredited universities and four- 
year colleges, rose 6.6 percent over last year, "the ninth 
straight year of increased American collegiate enrollments." 

The enrollment survey is particularly significant because 
it indicates academic trends and helps university officials 
predict future enrollment figures. 

For example: this year's full-time freshman enrollment, 
though still on the rise, is well below last year's 11.4 percent 
increase. Reasons for the smaller freshman increase are given 
as: "196 l's unsettled economic conditions, limited capacities 
of many institutions, and the relatively low World War II 
years' birthrate." 

At the same time, the survey warns against, "the impact 
of the massive post-war years' birthrate three years from now." 



Another trend revealed by the survey is that the nation's 
freshmen are enrolling in arts and sciences and education 
curricula at the expense of two other fields, business admin- 
istration and engineering. 

Freshman enrollment figures show a 9.8 percent increase 
in teacher training programs, and a 6. percent increase in arts 
and sciences. At the same time freshman enrollment in busi- 
ness administration is down 0.5 percent and engineering down 
0.4 percent. 

In conducting the survey, Dr. Parker categorizes his sta- 
tistics by types of institutions, such as teachers colleges: inde- 
pendent colleges of arts and sciences; fine arts, applied arts, 
and music schools; independent technological schools: and 
large public and private universities. 

According to the survey, enrollment at each of these in- 
stitutions is on the upswing. The large public and private 
universities, which together have more than half the nation's 
students, rank second in rate of increase with a 7.6 percent 
gain. 

The nation's teachers colleges arc in the lead with a 14 
percent increase in enrollment, almost double that o\ am 
other category. 



January-February, 1962 



ittll 




Piersall and Lemon 






Nugent and Beebe 



Dr. Byrd and Brigham 



UA im 



M" Club Banquet 



THE MONOGRAM CLUB, BETTER KNOWN AS THE "m" 
Club, held its eleventh annual banquet at the Sheraton 
Park Hotel, December 2, to recognize outstanding 
achievement in the world of sports. 

The "M" Club began in 1923 for the purpose of encourag- 
ing athletic competition and participation for all students 
interested in athletics; to render financial aid to worthy boys 
desiring higher education; and to maintain the highest ideals 
in inter-collegiate athletics. 

Toastmaster for the evening program was Bill Malone, radio 
and television personality. 

Dr. Lawrence Smallwood, Vice President of Club, presented 
the Charles P. McCormick Award to Paul W. Quinn, '61, 
Maryland Golfer; The Talbot T. Speer Award to William H. 
Johnson, winner of a number of low and high hurdle champ- 
ionships; the A. V. Williams Award to Donald Brown, co- 
captain of the 1961 baseball team; and John William 
Guckeyson Memorial Award to Robert E. Hacker, a two-letter 
man in football and wrestling, and a fine scholar (3.17 
average). 

Coach Tom Nugent presented the James M. Tatum 
Memorial Award to Bill Kirchiro as the outstanding tackle 
of the year. 

Director of Athletics W. W. Cobey presented the All 
American Awards to Clayton A. Beardmore, Lacrosse, and 
Gary J. Collins, Football. 

Clayton is an outstanding midfielder and opposing player. 
In 1958, he was named to All M.S.A. Lacrosse Team. He 
received the William P. Cole Memorial Award, 1961 and 
the 1961 Naval Academy's Seth Memorial Award. 

Gary is considered the best end football player to have 
ever played at Maryland. In his Junior and Senior years he 
was named "National Lineman of the Week" and was "Con- 
ference Lineman of the Week" several times. He has broken 
many records with his catches, blocks, tackles, and wins. 

The Atlantic Coast Conference Championship Coaches 



Award went to Bill Campbell, Swimming; Jack Faber and Al 
Heagy, Lacrosse; Jim Kehoe, Track; William E. "Sully"' 
Krouse, Wrestling; and Doyle P. Royal, Soccer. 

Persons selected for honorary membership in the "M" Club 
were: 

Robert L. Bensinger, Tennis Champion; Miss Edith Froth- 
ingham, Secretary and Financial Supervisor for the Athletic 
Department; Arthur N. Morris, a longtime unsung friend of 
the "M" Club and Maryland Athletics; Tom Nugent, Head 
Football Coach since 1959; and Alfred J. "Duke" Wyre, 
Terps' Head Trainer for the past 15 years. 

The State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame Awards were 
presented by the Toastmaster, Bill Malone. They went to: 
William Wilder Evans, a 1930 graduate, an all-around good 
athlete earning the Freshman Numerals and three letters each 
in Football, Basketball and Lacrosse; Charles Lincoln Herzog 
(deceased), Star Infielder in the National League 1908-20; 
Harry Jeffra, world-famous boxer, winning the Bantamweight 
Championship in 1937, and the World Featherweight Crown 
in 1940; and Frederick Charles "Fritz" Maisel, played base- 
ball for the Orioles, Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. 

Jim Lemon, Minneapolis Twins, presented the Sports 
Achievement Award to Jimmy Piersall of the Washington 
Senators. Jim, one of the Nation's most spectacular baseball 
stars, is starting his 10th season in the American League 
with the Washington Senators. He ranked fourth in the 
League with a .322 batting average as Cleveland's Center 
Fielder. He is the father of 8 children at the age of 32. 

David L. Brigham, Executive Secretary of Alumni Asso- 
ciation, presented the Outstanding Citizens Award to Dr. H. 
C. Byrd, former President of the University. Dr. Byrd has 
served the University as Coach, Instructor, Athletic Director, 
Assistant to the President, Vice President, and in 1935 became 
President. He resigned in 1954 to seek the Governorship of 
the State. He was the founder and first President of the "M" 
Club. 



the Maryland Magazine 



Mr. Holter Receives 
Agriculture Award 

For his outstanding activities and con- 
tributions in agriculture, Mr. Edward F. 
Holter has been named Maryland's 1961 
Man of the Year by The Progressive 
Fanner magazine. Mr. Holter is Vice 
Chairman of the University's Board of 
Regents. He has served on the Board 
since 1947. 

Each year an award is presented to 
one person from each state in a reg- 
ional area covering North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Virginia and Maryland. 

The winners from the other states 
were: Brooks James, Dean of Agricul- 
ture, University of North Carolina; C. 
Norwood Hastie, Jr., owner of the 
world-famous magnolia garden nursery 
in South Carolina; and Wilson B. Bell, 
Associate Director for Farmers Home 
Administration in Maryland and Dela- 
ware. 

Mr. Holter is a well-known figure in 
the field of agriculture, he is the State 
Director for Farmers Home Adminis- 
tration in Maryland and Delaware; 
member of the Grange movement; life- 
long member of the Farm Bureau; he is 
a member of Farm Conference Division 
of the National Safety Council; Presi- 
dent of Farmers and World Affairs, Di- 
rector of American Country Life Asso- 
ciation; and in Frederick County, his 
home state, he has served as county 
commissioner. 

Student Union Addition 
to be Completed in 1962 

Work on a $1,797,000 expansion of 
the Student Union Building at College 
Park is well underway with completion 
expected in the fall of 1962. 

A total of 85,000 square feet of 
floor space will be added to the present 
building, which was erected in 1954, 
bringing the total upon completion to 
137,000 square feet. 

Enrollment increases since 1954 have 
necessitated the need for expanded 
union facilities. 

New areas which will be added in- 
clude a large, multi-purpose auditorium, 
fine arts lounge, a cafeteria, meeting 
and conference rooms and recreational 
facilities. 

Present facilities which are slated 
for expansion are the student supply 
store, snack bar, student organization 
offices, music practice rooms and serv- 
ice areas. 

The new construction is financed 
from student fees which are charged 
for the use of the building. 



1962 Alumni Fund 

March 14, 1962 is the date set lor the 
start ol this year's alumni fund Ol I he 

Greater University ol Maryland Fund. 

The Planning Committee ol the an- 
nual alumni canvass has established as 
a priority objective support for the 
University's Distinguished Faculty Pro- 
gram. The Committee has also pledged 
continued support to scholarship, cul- 
tural and library projects. 

Two years ago the Distinguished Fac- 
ulty Program was established for the 
purpose of attracting and holding out- 
standing scholars and faculty members 
for both the Baltimore and College 
Park campuses. Special opportunities 
for professional development through 
faculty fellowships for advanced study, 
faculty internships and special faculty 
projects for study, research and publi- 
cation are also provided in this program. 

Since the establishment of The 
Greater University of Maryland Fund 
approximately 10,000 gifts totaling more 
than $500,000 have been given to the 
University. 

Alumni are being invited between 
now and March to serve as members 
of committees for the purpose of mak- 
ing personal calls on Maryland's 40,000 
alumni during the three-month cam- 
paign. 

Active Planning Committee members 
include: Albert E. Goldstein, Chair- 
man; Howard C. Filbert, National Can- 
vass Chairman; John Krantz, Special 
Gifts Chairman; Kenneth Fowler, Bal- 
timore Area Representative; Myron 
Aisenberg, Dean, School of Dentistry; 
Robert Weiss, Washington Area Rep- 
resentative; G. K. Reiblich, School of 
Law Representative; and Norma Yeager, 
Nurses Alumni Association Represen- 
tative. 



Maryland I amilies I lost 
Foreign Visitors 

I ighteen Maryland families have made 
,i valuable contribution to international 

relations by serving as hosts to foreign 

nationals here to learn bovi Maryland 

operates its extension program through 
the State Bo. iid ol Agriculture and the 
University's ( ollege ol Agriculture. All 
ol the visitors are extension officials in 
their respective countries ol the Philip- 
pine Islands. Republic ol ( hiii.i. I h.n 

land. Vietnam, Bolivia. Indonesia, Iraq 

and Kore.i. 

Under the sponsorship ol the I S 

American lnternation.il Development 

program, the participants attended 

classes at College Park, and observed 
first-hand how Maryland countv agents 
conduct extension affairs throughout the 
State. 

"The morning alter I arrived in Par- 
sonville (Md.). I awoke at 6 a.m.." one 
visitor reported. 

"I dressed and went downstairs to 
wait for my hosts to get out of bed to 
begin the day's work and activities. 
After waiting a long time without see- 
ing them, the thought crossed my mind 
that Americans were lazy people. 

"My impression was soon changed. 
They had been out of bed since 4:30 
and work had been underway for some 
time," he declared. 

This incident was related by Mr. Do 
Quang Giao, Assistant Director of Agri- 
cultural Extension in Saigon. Vietnam. 
Mr. Giao was the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Reddish, of Wicomico 
County. 

The experience was typical. Mary- 
land's foreign visitors were impressed 
with how hard American rural families 

Continued on page 14 




A TEAM OF varsity SCHOLARS represented the University on the G. E. College 
Bowl, a CBS television program, on January 21, against 4 scholars from another 
university (the winner of the previous week's show). Vying for a SI .500 scholarship 
grant are left to right: Edward Deitemeier, English major: Robert Detwiler. mathe- 
matics major; Mrs. Annette Flower. English major; and Julian Tepper. English 
major. [The results of the contest were not known at press time. Ed.] 



January-February, 1962 



Alumni Club Meetings 

The Montgomery County Club will hold 
its mid-Winter meeting February 17 at 
the Kenwood County Club. For reser- 
vations please contact Dr. Donald Boyd, 
President, at 15220 Georgia Ave., Nor- 
beck. Maryland. 

The Baltimore Club will have as their 
guests on March 16. members of the 
Board of Regents at a buffet supper 
planned for the Baltimore Union. A 
lecture, titled "Latin America — a sleep- 
ing giant."' will be presented by Dr. 
Horace V. Harrison. Associate Profes- 
sor of Government and Politics. 



National Collegiate Athletic 

Association Eastern Regional 

Basketball Tournament 

March 16-17 

Cole Activities Building 

University of Maryland at 

College Park 

All seats reserved, $2.00 and $3.00. 
Mail orders should be sent to Box 
295, College Park, Maryland and 
checks made out to NCAA. Add 
25c for postage and insurance. 





1961-62 


Varsity Basketball 


February 3 


Navy — Away 


6 


North Carolina — 




Home 


9 


South Carolina — 




A way 


10 


Clemson — A way 


13 


Duke — Home 


17 


Wake Forest — 




A way 


19 


North Carolina — 




A way 


21 


Virginia — Home 


24 


Clemson — Home 


March 1-3 


ACC Tournament 




at Raleigh, North 




Carolina. 



1961-62 
Freshman Basketball 



February 6 



13 



Bullis Prep- 
Home 



Fort Myers — 

Home 
21 Virginia — Home 

24 DcMatha High 

School — Home 

Home Games start at 6:15 P.M. 
Coach: Frank Fellows. 



Computer Science Center 
Planned at College Park 

A computation science center is in the 
planning stages at the University of 
Maryland and Dr. Werner C. Rhein- 
boldt, of Syracuse University, has been 
appointed to the University's adminis- 
trative staff to head the new unit. 

This will be the first computation cen- 
ter in this region to centralize education 
research and service in this science. 

According to Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, 
University Vice President for Academic 
Affairs, the unit will provide a facility 
for development of courses, research 
computation for all departments of the 
University and will service generally the 
University's participation with govern- 
ment and industry. 

The new center, for which an IBM 
7090 computer ultimately is envisioned, 
is expected to be in operation by 1963. 

Presently, several small computers are 
already in operation at College Park, in- 
cluding a 1401 IBM auxiliary satellite 
computer being used for administrative 
work, an LPG 30 IBM computer being 
used for space research in the Depart- 
ment of Physics, and a 1620 IBM com- 
puter in the College of Engineering. The 
computer in engineering is being used 
for both teaching and research. 

In addition, the Departments of Math- 
ematics and Office Management and 
Techniques are offering courses in this 
new science. 



Faculty Recognized by 
Academy of Science 

Three University of Maryland faculty 
members were among a group of six area 
scientists who have been cited for scien- 
tific achievement by the Washington 
Academy of Science. 

They are Robert W. Krauss, Professor 
of Botany, in the biological sciences, 
Lawrence E. Payne, Research Professor 



in the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics, in mathematics; 
and Ralph D. Myers, Professor of 
Physics, for outstanding service in the 
teaching of science. 

Other area scientists included John 
D. Hoffman, of the National Bureau of 
Standards, in engineering; Rodney E. 
Grantham, of the Naval Ordnance Lab- 
oratory, in physical sciences; and Charles 
R. Naeser, of George Washington Uni- 
versity, in teaching. 

The Academy's awards program was 
initiated in 1939 to recognize young 
scientists of this area for "noteworthy 
discovery, accomplishments, or publica- 
tion" in these academic fields. 

Dr. Krauss, who has been a pioneer 
in the applied development of algae 
cultures, was cited for his contributions 
in this field. Dr. Payne was cited for his 
contribution to the theory of partial 
differential equations. Dr. Myers, who 
has taught nearly all the regular courses 
offered in the University of Maryland 
Department of Physics at some time or 
other during his 23 years at College 
Park, is leader of his Department's re- 
search group in solid state phenomenon. 



$850,000 NSF Grant 
Awarded to Physics 

A grant of $850,000 for graduate re- 
search laboratory development has been 
made to the Department of Physics by 
the National Science Foundation. 

This is the largest graduate-level re- 
search facility grant ever made by 
N.S.F. 

The grant fits into a building program 
for the Department which was approved 
by the Board of Regents over the past 
several years. Of the four stages planned, 
two are scheduled for completion by 
this June. 

These include an addition to the Van 
de Graaff accelerator facility used by 



Scholarly Text Available to Alumni 

The publication of the first two Henry H. Brechbill lectures are 
now available for sale by the Student Supply Store, University of 
Maryland. The two lectures, "What Good is a University in the 
Americas," by Harold R. W. Benjamin and "Conflict in Education 
Between Science and Humanism," by Agnes E. Meyer, are pub- 
lished together in the same bulletin. These are the first two lectures 
in a lecture series established to honor Dr. Brechbill, retired Assist- 
ant Dean and Professor of Education of the College of Education. 

The publication is available at a cost of $1.03. Orders should be 
sent and checks made payable to the Student Supply Store, Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 



the Maryland Magazine 



the Department's Experimental Physics 
Group, a neutron pit being constructed 
at the northeast corner of the existing 
building and a fourth floor addition to 
the existing building to provide space- 
mainly for high energy physics, astron- 
omy, and theorists' otfices. 

A third stage provides for the con- 
struction of another addition to the 
northwest of the existing building to 
provide shops in the basement and other 
research and teaching facilities on the 
four floors above. 

The fourth stage calls for construc- 
ting an addition to the building in 
which a spiral high-ridge cyclotron can 
be installed. 

Matching funds, required by the 
N.S.F. for all laboratory development 
grants, were appropriated by the Mary- 
land General Assembly. The University 



received $395,000 in I960 and $795,- 
000 in 1961. 

Nation. il Science Foundation giants 

are based upon a review o! the strength 
and potentialities oi the institution's 
graduate training program in a particu 

lar field of research. In the case ol 

physics at the University ol Maryland, 

the number of lull-time graduate stu- 
dents increased from 181 in I960 to 
242 in [961. The number ol fellowships 
awarded to these students has doubled 
in the last year. 

In addition, the faculty has increased 
by 32 percent. 

Graduate research programs are un- 
derway in all of the specializations 
within physics, and about 16 students 
are expected to complete requirements 
for the Ph.D. degree this June. 

Planning and construction work has 



been made with close cooperation ol the 
Department's facult) I he building ad- 
dition foj the neutron pit has been 
supervised by Professoi William Horn 
s.ik High energy facilities on the 
fourth flooi are undei the direction >>t 
Professor George A Snow. I he cyclo- 
tron developmenl has been led b> Pro 
lessoi H. in-. Holmgren 

Physics teaching and icscarch tor the 

past semester al ( ollege Park has been 

under the direction ol I )i Howard 

I aster, who has served as Acting < hail 
man ol the Department during the 
absence ol Dr. John s. Toll, permanent 
( hairman, now on sabbatical leave 
from the University . 

Dr. loll, who has been conducting 
research in quantum field theors at the 
University ol I und. Sweden, will re- 
turn to Mars land in February. 



Alumni are invited to send 


items of interest to the following 


correspondents for 


The Maryland Magazine. 


University of Ma 


■yland at College Park 


College of Agriculture 


College of Home Economics 


Prof. A. B. Hamilton 


Dean Selma Lippe tt 


Room 252A, Symons Hall 


Room 110A, Margaret Brent Hall 


Department of Air Science 


College of Physical Education, 


Captain Robert A. Delmar 


Recreation and Health 


Room 26, Armory 


Miss Mary R. Harrington 


College of Business and Public Room 201, Preinkert Field House 


Administration 


University College 


Dean James H. Reid 


Mr. Al Sager 


Room 144, BPA Building 


Room 200, Skinner Building 


College of Education 


College of Arts & Sciences 


Mrs. Mary J. Ahalt 


Dean Charles Manning 


Room 1 14, Skinner Building 


Room 112, Francis Scott Key Hall 


College of Engineering 




Prof. R. M. Ginnings 




Room 1 12, Engineering Building 


University of Maryland at Baltimore 


Dentistry 


School of Pharmacy 


Dr. Kyrle W. Preis 


Dr. B. Olive Cole 


700 Cathedral Street 


3800 Beech Avenue 


Baltimore 


Baltimore 1 1 


Law 


School of Nursing 


Dr. G. K. Reiblich 


Miss Joan White, R.N. 


3d Floor LB 


Office of the Dean 


School of Law 


School of Nursing 


Medicine 


School of Social Work 


Dr. John A. Wagner 


Dean Verl S. Lewis 


Room 301, G.L. 


School of Social Work 


School of Medicine 





January-February, 1962 



AT THE 
BERLIN WALL 




Maryland Overseas Students 

Stand Guard with a Book in One Hand 

and a Rifle in the Other 



By James L. Colwell 
Assistant Director, European Division, University College 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND'S CAMPUS, THROUGH 
the worldwide operation of University College, 
touches both the Iron Curtain and its bamboo coun- 
terpart in Turkey, Korea, and in Germany. In one 
spot this extensive campus even reaches a point more than 
a hundred miles behind the Communist-built blockade of 
steel and concrete. That spot is Berlin, where world atten- 
tion is currently drawn to the potential peril of a major 
conflict. 



Through the center of this vast city runs history's best 
publicized spite fence, and among the men who daily patrol 
the free side of that fence are steel-helmeted Americans who, 
in their off-duty time, lay aside new M-14 rifles to pick up 
college textbooks. These men can be called Terrapins by 
adoption, for they are part-time Maryland students in classes 
administered by University College's European Division, a 
program which recently marked the beginning of its thir- 
teenth year of existence in Berlin. 




right: East German "vopos" string 
barbed-wire between concrete posts 
on the sector border. 



BELOW : University of Maryland Lec- 
turer Lauren Ekroth {center), Edu- 
cation Adviser Bruce H. Justis 
( right ) , and an unidentified Mary- 
land student watch East Berliners 
waving to friends and relatives from 
behind the wall. 



P^RfTiSSS 





On an October evening in 1949 the Berlin Army Educa- 
tion Center became one of the first six education centers on 
overseas American military installations to offer University 
of Maryland classes. That, too, was a time of great tension 
in Berlin, for the Berlin Blockade had ended only a few 
days before, on September 30. But students jammed all 
available classrooms in order to continue their education while 
in uniform, and since that time thousands of such students 
have been enrolled, sharing tuition costs with the service to 
which they belong. 

Through the years large numbers of these students have 
been helped to enroll through the efforts of Mr. George R. 
Lambert, who has long been the Berlin Command's Chief 
Education Adviser, and by Mr. Irving H. Krakusin, his 
predecessor. A number of their students have completed re- 
quirements for one of the two degrees offered by University 



College: the B.A. in General Studies and the B.S. in Military 
Studies. Graduates are awarded degrees in regular com- 
mencement ceremonies arranged by the European Division 
staff in Heidelberg, Germany, and attended by President 
Wilson H. Elkins; Chairman of the Board of Regents, Charles 
P. McCormick; Dean of University College, Ray Ehrensber- 
ger; distinguished commencement speakers such as Ambassa- 
dor David K. E. Bruce (a Maryland graduate), General 
Alfred M. Gruenther and Berlin's Mayor Willy Brandt; and 
often, the Governor of Maryland. 

This fall, despite frequent alerts, maneuvers, and other mili- 
tary precautions required by increasing Communist pressure 
in East Berlin, Maryland continued serving Berlin servicemen. 
Classes began as usual on September 1 1 with courses in busi- 
ness law, college algebra, German language and military his- 
tory attracting 113 enrollees for the first of the four eight- 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



YOU ARE LEAVING 
THE AMERICAN SECTOR 

Bbl BblE3WAETE H3 
AMEPMKAHCKOrO CEKTOPA 

VOUS SORTEZ 
DU SECTEUR AMERICAIN 

SIE VERLASSEN DEN AMEMKAN1SCHEH SEKTOR 



1 



. I !1! 



I i 



\ 



E^i 



.,._. 



X> 






•w^* 



Lecturer Eckroth stands at the edge of the American Sector as a "vopo" watches 
him through field glasses. "Socialism will win" boasts the sign behind the "vopo." 



.# 



week terms that make up the normal academic year overseas. 
Total enrollment for the European Division exceeded 10,000 
this term to set a new record. Classes are scheduled for three- 
hour sessions on two evenings a week. 

A visit to the Berlin Education Center, like a tour of the 
concrete and barbed-wire barrier snaking its way through the 
heart of this great city, can provide a study in contrasts be- 
tween the two philosophies locked in competition before the 
eyes of the world. The sight of American soldiers who spend 
their free time studying in civilian-administered classes pro- 
vides a living illustration of free enterprise, of academic free- 
dom, and of individual initiative. The fact that American 
soldiers are free to do this in the very face of an avowed 
enemy is a potent argument in favor of Western Democracy. 

Even more impressive, of course, is the forbidding aspect 
of life which the visitor sees to the east of the "Chinese Wall," 



as the West Berliners mockingly call the hated fence. There 
one can see drab buildings interspersed with deserted World 
War II ruins, heavily armed Vopos (Volkspolizei, or "People's 
Police") whose job it is to force East Germans to tolerate 
their Communist masters, and occasional crude memorials 
marking the spot where desperate refugees were shot as the) 
attempted to tlee to the West. The failure of Communism in 
Berlin is evident everywhere. 

Our Berlin Terrapins, book in one hand and ritle in the 
other, are living guarantees of West Berlin's continued free- 
dom. They are also representatives of the flexibility oi Ameri- 
can education and of the personal freedom Americans enjoj 
in obtaining their education. Mar\ landers can be proud of 
their University's part in helping sustain these men and their 
education program. 



January-February, 1962 



11 



Maryland Books and Authors 

by Mrs. Harold Hayes, 
Head, Maryland Room, McKeldin Library 



THE ORIGIN AND MEANING OF 
THE INDIAN PLACE NAMES OF 
MARYLAND by Hamill Kenny. Bal- 
timore: Waverly Press, 1961. xix, 
186. $7. 

DR. KENNY'S HOOK GIVES ETHNO- 
historians and place-name schol- 
ars occasion to rejoice. The subject of 
American Indian place-names has been 
treated both superficially and inexpertly, 
with so many invalid interpretations 
founded on whim or fancy, that a me- 
thodical, linguistic approach by an in- 
formed writer is an important contri- 
bution to knowledge. There have been 
a few others — but they are all too rare. 
Kenny's book is, in fact, the first ex- 
clusively Maryland Indian place-name 
volume. 

During the period of exploration and 
settlement, the English encountered the 
Conoy (Piscataway) and Nanticoke In- 
dians, as well as certain Powhatan 
affiliates, living on the Maryland water- 
ways. Culturally related to the Nanti- 
coke were the Choptank, Pocomoke, 
Assateague, and other bands found on 
the Eastern Shore. Many of the Mary- 
land Indian communities, as Kenny em- 
phasizes, were named from the streams 
on which they were seated. Other In- 
dians not native to the area — the Shaw- 
nee. Delaware, Susquehannock, Sen- 
eca, etc., — camped, hunted, or settled 
temporarily in Maryland. Today's prob- 
lem is to relate some 315 existing place- 
names of Indian provenience to the par- 
ticular Indians responsible for them; to 
identify the original places or physical 
features bearing the names; and to in- 
terpret the names without benefit of a 
grammar dictionary, or native speakers. 
Since the dialects of the Algonkian 
tongue spoken by the pre-litcrate Pow- 
hatan. Conoy, and Nanticoke are now 
extinct, verification of interpretations is 
difficult, and, in many instances, impos- 
sible. Furthermore, to complicate the 
problem, names have changed from one 
Indian place-name to another; from In- 
dian to English and again to Indian; 
from a colonial name to Indian; and 
from an Indian name to English. The 



About the Author 

Hamill Kenny, who holds the Bach- 
elor's and Master's degrees from Co- 
lumbia University, and the Doctor's 
degree in English from the University 
of Maryland, has devoted many years 
of his academic life to the study of 
American place names. He is the 
author of West Virginia Place Names, 
Their Origin and Meaning ( 1 945 ) , 
the unique authority on its subject. 
He is also the author of literary and 
linguistic articles, one of which took 
him to County Longford, Ireland, 
where he investigated the true origin 
of the Gaelic place name, Baltimore. 
His West Virginia place name book 
was reprinted in 1960 by the West 
Virginia University Library in a spe- 
cial limited edition for West Vir- 
ginia schools. 

To write the present book, it was 
necessary for Dr. Kenny to study 
the Algonquian language. This he did 
for five years in the Catholic Uni- 
versity Algonquian classes of the 
Reverend James A. Geary, well- 
known scholar in the field of Amer- 
ican linguistics. It was necessary be- 
sides for the author to explore the 
topography of the Indian streams, 
estuaries and mountains of Mary- 
land. Dr. Kenny estimates that in 
the course of this study he made at 
least one field trip to the locality of 
each of Maryland's 315 genuine In- 
dian place names. 

Dr. Kenny is pleased by the fact 
that his book is the first complete 
study ever to have been made of the 
Indian place names of Maryland. 
"Owing to their superficiality and 
lack of linguistic awareness," he de- 
clares, "most Algonquian place name 
studies fail to do justice to the In- 
dians' cunning grammar and rich vo- 
cabulary." He adds, "In the present 
book I feel that, at long last, full 
justice has been done to the Algon- 
quian place names of at least one 
representative area." 



author cites typical examples of each 
type of change. Superfluous English gen- 
erics, he also adds, have been attached 
to Indian place-names. Susquehanna 
means "smooth flowing stream," says 
Kenny, and on linguistic grounds does 
not need the word river tacked on. 
Chesapeake in Algonkian is translatable 
as "great shell-fish bay," and adding the 
English word bay to the Indian word 
is redundant. 

Kenny's interpretative approach — to 
the extent it is practicable — is to apply 
what he terms the Comparative Method. 
The basis of the method is that there 
was once a common, original Primitive 
Algonkian parent language, which no 
Algonkianist would dispute. The trick, 
and it's a neat one if you can do it, is 
to reconstruct a Primitive Algonkian 
archetype from the cognate stems of the 
several known and recorded dialects, 
such as Fox, Cree, Menominee, Ojib- 
way, and Abnaki, and then make pho- 
netic inferences. Also, according to the 
author, the interpreter must be guided 
by two broad rules, (a) the earliest 
European spelling of an Indian word is 
probably the most phonetic one, (b) 
later spellings, often contrived, are the 
most corrupt and popular. For instance, 
as Kenny explains, the Rockawalking 
Creek does not refer to a Mr. Rock 
walking to town one day instead of rid- 
ing (according to folk etymology), but 
the earliest recorded Algonkian forms 
Rockawakin and Rokiawaken, as as- 
sessed by the Comparative Method, can 
be postulated to mean "at the sandy 
ground." Kenny admits that the Com- 
partive Method, or, in fact, any system 
will not eliminate uncertainties, and he 
states frankly that he refuses to cloak 
doubt under the recommendation of an 
unfounded meaning. This conservatism 
is the mark of a scholar for which 
Kenny is to be admired and commended. 

The book consists of two principal 
parts; first, an Introductory Essay deal- 
ing, among other things, with etho- 
nology and tribal migrations. It also 
contains a separate note on a 17th cen- 
tury Algonkian grammar, dictionary, and 
catechism believed to have been com- 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



posed by Father White, but now miss- 
ing. Investigators have long sought these 
lost writings, including Kenny himself, 
who searched the libraries of Rome on 
five different occasions without success. 

Part two is the Dictionary contain- 
ing 228 entries, each giving location, 
map or documentary spelling, previous 
opinions, and the author's own conclu- 
sions. There is also an Appendix con- 
taining 28 entries of "Extinct, Mis- 
spelled, Scantily Documented Names, 
Apparently Indian" supplied by William 
B. Marye, and 38 entries entitled 
"Words Found by Mr. William B. 
Marye in Patent Records for Land, 
Land Office, Annapolis." 

In the first section, Kenny generously 
gives to Bulletin 30 of the Bureau of 
American Ethnology (the so-called 
"Handbook") greater credence than 
most ethno-historians are willing to ac- 
cord a work published more than 50 
years ago, and in need of up-dating. For 
example, the contributors to the "Hand- 
book" of data on the Maryland Indians 
were gravely in error in their appraisal 
of the Nanticoke (see fn. 45 of my The 
Nanticoke Indians, Penna. Hist. & Mu- 
seum Commission, Harrisburg, 1948, a 
title missing from Kenny's bibliog- 
raphy). 

The Dictionary will have to stand on 
its own merits, and Kenny will not ex- 
pect full agreement on all of his inter- 
pretations, which, as previously indi- 
cated, cannot, at this late date, be veri- 
fied and largely depend upon judgments. 
I am glad that he did not labor the 
theory that the name of the town of 
Vienna, Maryland is derived from a 
contraction of the Nanticoke Emperor 
Unacokasimmon, which would be diffi- 
cult to establish by the Comparative 
Method, and does not yield to proof 
by historic evidence. Although an Em- 
peror's Landing may have been at Vi- 
enna (there were more than one Em- 
peror's Landings in Maryland) it is far 
from certain that it honored this par- 
ticular Algonkian potentate. Unacoka- 
simmon was succeeded as emperor by 
his brother Ohoperoon in 1687, who 
was succeeded by his nephew Asquash 




" e 

Origin 

and 

Meaning 

of the 

Indian 

Place 

Naries 

iof 

Mary-Iajid 

By HAMILL KENNY. Ph.D. 



in 1692. These successive aboriginal em- 
peror "coronations" probably took place 
before Vienna was laid out. 

Perhaps the patently non-Indian 
names in the Dictionary (Johns Ham- 
mock, Handys Hammock, Jamaica 
Point, Savage Mountain, Savage Neck, 
Locust Necktown, Paint Branch, and 
others) should have been separated from 
the true Indian words and listed as 
"pseudo-Indian." This is strictly a per- 
sonal observation that in no way is in- 
tended to detract from Kenny's interest- 
ing and valuable syntheses of the Mary- 
land place-names of indisputable Indian 
origin. 

One listing in the Appendix is "Their 
Quankosine House," taken from a 1713 
entry in the Maryland Archives. The 
author suggests this is "perhaps a con- 
traction of goose (kahunge, kahan- 
quuoc)" and lets it go at that. William 
B. Marye in two essays published in 
American Antiquity ("Former Indian 
Sites in Maryland As Located by Early 
Colonial Records, 2: 40-46, and "Bur- 
ial Methods in Maryland and Adjacent 
States," ibid., 209-214) cites Quiahke- 
son Neck (on the Nanticoke River), 
Cuiaskason Swamp (on the Choptank 
River), and Quacotion House Point (on 
a branch of the Pocomoke River). 
These place-names are all seemingly de- 
rived from the Quioccason—Chiacason 
house, the burial temple, or charnel 
house, of the Maryland Indians. The 
survival of the word in its several vari- 



ants is of utmost importance to the 
ethnologist and archeologist in tracing 
the geographical distribution ol a mortu- 
ary custom that included bone scraping 
and secondary burial in ossuaries. It 
would have been of more than casual 
interest if the author had elected to re- 
duce this word to English by the Com- 
parative Method (it also occurs in the 
Carolinas and is recorded by Lawson as 
Quicason, and is found in the William 
Vans Murray 1792 vocabulary of the 
Choptank Indian remnants as Quacasun- 
hoitse). 1 daresay the end product of a 
careful analysis of the several forms 
would kill the "goose." 

Kenney's study reveals that the larg- 
est percentage of Maryland's surviving 
Indian place-names have reference to 
water, attesting to the fact that the local 
Indians lived on or near water, travel- 
led by water, and depended upon fish- 
ing for a livelihood. Land names are 
second in importance, including words 
relating to hills, earth, and dwelling 
sites. Animals are third in number, 
e.g., beaver, gull, porcupine, goose, wild- 
cat, possum, etc. Other names reflect 
plants, wearing apparel, ceremonies, 
weather, agriculture, and commerce. 

The book is well indexed, which adds 
to its usefulness as a valuable reference 
work. The selected bibliography contains 
an imposing list of titles, indicative oi 
the painstaking research that went into 
the preparation of one of the outstand- 
ing books of its kind. 



Reviewed by Dr. C. A. Wesi.ager. a 
recognized authority on the ethno-his- 
tory of the Delaware and Chesapeake 
Bay areas. He has served as past-presi- 
dent of the Archeological Association of 
Delaware and the Eastern States Arche- 
ological Federation. His latest book, to 
be published shortly In the University 
of Pennsylvania Press, is Dutch Explor- 
ers. Traders and Settlers. 1609-1664. 

The Maryland Magazine gratefully 

acknowledges the courtes\ ot The Mary- 
land Historical Magazine tor permission 
to reprint this review. 



January-February, J 962 



13 



Alumni Notes from page 5 

work, how all members of the family 
work together, and the contribution that 
the women in the family make to home- 
making. 

Soepandrijono Djojodiredjo, Chief of 
the Agriculture Service in East Java, 
Indonesia, noted that Mr. Roger Day 
worked very hard on his 75-acre dairy 
farm in Damascus. Maryland. 

"It was very difficult for me to un- 
derstand how one man could operate 
such a large area with just one helper." 
Djojodiredjo said. 

"In my country, there would have 
been 10 helpers,'* he concluded. 

Most of the course participants, all 
of whom spoke English, were immedi- 
ately at home with the Maryland fam- 
ilies. Their activities were varied and 
included everything from chores, such 
as dish-washing and feeding stock, to 
attending church and playing with the 
children. 

Through the experience, Mr. and 
Mrs. Winfred Widdowson, of Princess 
Anne, Maryland, have begun corre- 
spondence with the family of their guest, 
Aurelio R. Salas, provincial agricul- 
turist from Binan, Legune, the Philip- 
pines. 

Salas and other foreign visitors visited 
high schools and attended group meet- 
ings within the area of their temporary 
homes and discussed the culture and 
lite of their native lands. 

Many letters have been received by 
the University of Maryland Extension 
Service which have indicated how var- 
ious host families felt about their ex- 
perience. 

". . . it was agreed that this was not 
only a rich experience for us to have 
been associated with Mr. Koeswarno 
Prodjodarsono, of Indonesia, but that 
this is an excellent way that we here in 
America may do much in the long run 
to create a much more wholesone in- 
ternational understanding of free men 
everywhere," a typical letter states. 

According to William R. Gordon, 
AID's technical director for the exten- 
sion program here, the University of 
Maryland Extension Service program 
was chosen as an example for the visi- 
tors because it is one of the oldest in 
the Nation. Maryland's extension work 
was begun in 1856. 

Dr. V. R. Cardozier, Head of the 
Agricultural and Extension Education 
Department, was in charge of the short 
course program's content. 

( ourse participants heard, as part of 
their study, a series of lectures from 
Dr. Thomas B. Symons, an interna- 
tionally known expert on extension serv- 
ice work and Director of the University 



of Maryland Extension Service from 
1914 until 1950. Dr. Symons is pres- 
ently Dean Emeritus of Agriculture and 
a member of the Board of Regents, 
which also serves as the State Board 
of Agriculture. 

While course emphasis was given 
to extension supervision, participants 
were taught how information gained 
through research conducted by the Col- 
lege of Agriculture is communicated 
through the county agent to the farm 
operator, according to Professor Arthur 
B. Hamilton, who was in charge of ar- 
rangements for the group. 

"We felt that the best way to accom- 
plish this goal was to supplement course 
work on the campus with a first-hand 
contact with farm families — giving them 
an opportunity to work with county 
and home demonstration agents. Our 
objective was to give them an under- 
standing of the functions of the College 
of Agriculture, home economics, the Ex- 
periment Station and resident teaching." 
Representing their respective nations 
were three women: Mrs. Lourdes A. 
Florcruz and Miss Imelda U. Lavarez, 
the Philippines; and Miss Phung Thi 
Bach, Vietnam. 

Mr. Aurelio R. Salas also represented 
the Philippines and Do Quang Giao 
was a delegate of Vietnam. 

Participating from Indonesia were 
Mr. Djojodiredjo, Mr. John J. Tomasoa, 
Mr. Koeswarno Prodjodarsono and Mr. 
Mas Sutama. Thailand's representatives 
were Mr. Dusit Sinthavalaya, Mr. 
Prakai Chitrakorn and Mr. Kungsdarn 
Devahastin. 

The Republic of China's delegates 
included Mr. Yi Feng Tang and Mr. 
Yau Hung Chen. 

Other participants were: Mr. J. Cusi- 
canqui of Bolivia, Mr. Jawad M. H. Al- 
Sharify of Iraq and Mr. Wook Don Han 
and Mr. Dong Wan Shin of Korea. 

Maryland families, in addition to the 
Days, Reddishs and Widdowsons, who 
participated in the program were: 
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Null, Taneytown 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ernst, Route 1, Clear 

Spring 
Mr. and Mrs. Allie Messer, Route 2, 

Frederick 
Mr. George A. Nicholson, Detour 
Mr. and Mrs. George Stauffer. Walkers- 

ville 
Mr. Oscar and Walter Schmidt, Centre- 

ville 
Mr. Edwin Johnson, Comus 
Mrs. Atlee Armour, Rising Sun 
Mrs. John O'Mara, Marriottsville 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Gill, White Hall 
Mr. Walter T. Morris, Jr.. Chestertown, 

RD 2 
Mr. Wayne A. Cawley, Jr., Denton 



Mr. Calvin Compton, Port Tobacco 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Snodgrass, Street 
Mr. Henry Magness, Street 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hutchinson, Cordova 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 

International Politics 

Galo Plaza, '29, returned to Washington 
as the special envoy of President Carlos 
Arosomena of Ecuador. Dr. Plaza as- 
sured President Kennedy and Secretary 
Rusk that his government is definitely 
"liberal." 

President Arosomena made a con- 
vincing choice of envoys. Dr. Plaza is 
a highly respected friend of the United 
States, both here and at home. He was 
born in New Jersey and is a graduate 
of our College of Agriculture. Follow- 
ing graduation, he returned to his home 
in Ecuador and developed an outstand- 
ing herd of dairy cows. 

Politics were in his blood and in 
1948 he was elected President of Ecua- 
dor and was the first president to finish 
his constitutional term of office since 
1925. 

Brosius Builds 

William Brosius, '40, has joined the 
"They Said It Couldn't Be Done" Club 
by building and selling 70 attractive 3- 
bedroom homes at a cost of less than 
$10,000. 

Brosius' accomplishment was spot- 
lighted in a cover story in the NAHB 
Journal of the National Association of 
Home Builders. 

Bunting Joins Hortorium 

Dr. George S. Bunting, '50, has joined 
the Botany staff of the L. H. Bailey 
Hortorium at Cornell University. His 
first assignment was a trip to Mexico 
for dried and living specimens of Ges- 
neriaceae and Araceae for study at 
Cornell. 

With Our Retired 

"What will I do when I retire?" This is 
not a frustrating question to our alumni. 

W. T. Henerey was a research chem- 
ist for West Virginia Pulp and Paper 
Company for 25 years. After the usual 
farewell banquet, he became a teacher 
in charge of the Science Department 
at Garrett County High School. 

R. S. Brown is the Agricultural Rep- 
resentative for the Easton National 
Bank. 

Dr. T. B. Symons, Director of Public 
Relations for Suburban Trust Company, 
continues to come up with young ideas 
to keep the bank before the public. 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Dr. S. H. DeVault, alter ten years 
of retirement, produces a big garden at 
Paint Branch Farms, Silver Spring. 

The author would like to hear of 
others who are enjoying their retirement. 

Students Meet Ag Secretary 

Secretary of Agriculture Orville I.. 
Freeman presented commendations for 
tine work to six Cooperative Extension 
workers who have completed study pro- 
grams at the University of Maryland 
leading toward a Master's degree. Grad- 
uate students who met with Secretary 
Freeman were: Miss Barbara Smith, 
New York; Miss Virginia Griffin, Ohio; 
Miss Wanda Gumprecht, California; 
Donald Mitchell, Idaho; John Burbank, 
Nebraska; and James Kemp, Colorado. 

Milligan Returns 

Dr. John L. Milligan, '46, has been ap- 
pointed Associate Professor of Poultry 
in the College of Agriculture. 

A native of Prince Georges County, 
Dr. Milligan has been Poultry Research 
Manager of the Ralston Purina Com- 
pany, St. Louis, Missouri since 1951. 

A prolific writer in the field of poul- 
try science. Dr. Milligan served as a 
consultant with the U. S. Feed Grains 
Council and the Foreign Agriculture 
Service of USDA. Dr. Milligan has been 
assigned at times to visit Colombia, 
Venezuela and Mexico to help train 
local poultry people and help feed 
manufacturers. 



Honors For Truitt 

Retirement has given Dr. R. V. Truitt 
the time for even greater accomplish- 
ments. During the year he was elected 
to the American Hall of Fame in La- 
Crosse, to honorary membership in the 
Worcester County Historical Society, to 
the Presidency of the Queen Anne"s 
County Historical Society, to honorary 
membership in the National Shellfish- 
eries Association, and was awarded a 
plaque as Maryland's outstanding con- 
servationist. Back of each of these 
awards, there is a story of a great 
Marylander! 

Stier Joins United Fruits 

Dr. Howard L. "Jack" Stier, '32, has 
been named by the United Fruit Com- 
pany to head their Quality Control Di- 
vision at the Company's Boston office. 

In announcing Dr. Stier's appoint- 
ment. John M. Fox, Executive Vice 
President of United Fruit, said, "Quality 
assurance is one of the most important 
aspects of our marketing program." 

United Fruit is one of the leading im- 
porters of bananas. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



I iks i Policewoman Hikidiok 
P. g. Coun I v 

Carole Ann Policy, '58, is Prince 
Georges County's first Policewoman. 
She will be assigned to the Juvenile 
Squad. 

At the University Miss Policy ma- 
jored in psychology and took her minors 
in sociology and criminology. 

Dr. Schweizer Retires 

Associate Professor Mark Schweizer ol 
the Department of Foreign Languages 
retired in 1961 after being associated 
with the University since 1929. 

He was born in the vicinity of Zur- 
ich, Switzerland and his first degrees 
were Swiss. At the University of Mary- 
land he acquired an M.A. in 1931 and, 
in 1941, a Ph.D., with a thesis on the 
German poet Rilke. 

A strongly-built man with an outdoor 
air about him. Dr. Schweizer is learned 
in many fields. He taught mostly Ger- 
man literature and language courses, 
and occasionally French. He is an au- 
thority on Germanic philology, Old and 
Middle High German. For years he 
contributed to Swiss magazines, chiefly 
poetry. 

As a small boy, his interest in arche- 
ology was aroused by exploring Roman 
ruins. In 1957 the University's General 
Research Board awarded Dr. Schweizer 
a grant-in-aid to study the structure of 
the ancient Greek theatre. He con- 
ducted research in Greece, 1957-58. 
Now that he is retired, he plans to com- 
plete his book which will shed light 
on acoustical and other solutions to 
problems connected with the ancient 
Greek theatre. 

Dr. Schweizer, with his wife Hedy. 
also from the Zurich area, divide their 
time this year between Cape Cod and 
Florida, where their three sons practice 
architecture jointly. The oldest son, 
Niels, was a protege of Frank Lloyd 
Wright. 

Language Appointments 

Madame Cecile Johnson, a native of 
France, who taught at Sweet Briar for 
many years, is now Lecturer in French 
at Maryland. Teaching French and 
Spanish is Mr. Alejandro dc Vanguardia, 
a graduate of the Naval Academy in 
Spain. He has taught in Montgomery 
County, the District of Columbia, and 
the 1961 Language Institute at Mary- 
land. Another Spanish-bom instructor 
is Mrs. Pilar G. Saenz, who has an 
M.A. from the University of Madrid 



and anothei from Bi y n Maw i Coll 
She has served as Directoi ol the Span- 
ish House .a Western Reserve l n 
sity's Summei School Mi Eulalii i 
Herdoiza is now Instructoi in Spanish 
aftei ha\ ing sci ved istanl in the 

University Spanish l\ course She has 
taught in her native I CUadoi and studied 
.it Quito's t nneisul.ni ( inii.il before 
coming u> Maryland, where she i 
hei M.A. and is now preparing a Ph I) 

A II \l<\ I SI Ol I'l 111 l< \ I lo\s 

Department ol Foreign Language pub- 
lications in I '"'I touched on man) 
fields. Dean I con P. Smith contributed 
"A Newly Discovered Manuscript I 
ment of the Old 1 rench Partonopeus 
de Blois" to Modern Philology, l ni 
versus ot ( hicago. 

A Critical Bibliography of 17th ( en 
tury French Literature contained eon 
tributions bj Professors William R 
Quynn and Leonora Cohen Rosenfield 
The book, published In the Syracuse 
University Press, is volume 111 under 
the Editorship of David ( obeen. 

Dr. Quynn contributed to Collier's 
Encyclopedia a piece on "Jean I ouis 
Cue/ de Balzac (1597-1654)." Dr. 
Rosenfield wrote a Preface to the Sec- 
ond Edition of Morris R. Cohen's The 
Meaning of Hitman History. The book. 
one of the Carus Lectures in Philosophy, 
was published in paper back, then in 
hard back by the Open Court Publish- 
ing Co. 

Professor Alfred J. Bingham, for 
Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth 
Century, wrote an article entitled "The 
Recueil philosophique et litter aire 
( 1769-1779)." Publication is in Geneva 
at the "Institut et Musee Voltaire." 

Professor Marguerite C. Rand's arti- 
cle on "Lazarillo de Tonnes. Classic and 
Contemporary" appeared in Hispania, 
Mrs. Pilar G. Saenz's "Three Tragedies 
by Frederico Garcia Lorca" in the 
Alumnae Journal of Trinity College. The 
Herman Quarterly brought out an "Ap- 
praisal of Teaching Beginning German 
by Closed Circuit Television" by Dr. 
Philip Rovner. Dr. Rosenfield's "Mysti- 
cism and Rationalism in Morris R. Co- 
hen" was published by The Personalis!. 
University of Southern California. Her 
review of "Aram Vartanian's Critical 
Edition of La Mettrie's L'Homme Ma- 
chine" appeared in The Romantic Re- 
view. 

Dr. Henry MendelofFs chapter "A 
Modern Foreign Language Program for 
the High School" came out in a volume 
published by the Catholic Universit) 
Press, reporting on that University's 
Foreign Language Workshop conducted 
in June I960. 

Mr. C. C. Chen has been asked to 
serve on the Advisors Board to edit a 
textbook of Selected Readings in Chin- 
ese Literature. The sponsorship will be 
by the American Association ol 
( ( 'ontinued on next page I 



January-February, 1962 



15 




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Teachers of Chinese Language and Cul- 
ture, under grant from the Ministry 
of Education of the Chinese Nationalist 
Government. The book will compile se- 
lections in Chinese from representative 
types of Chinese literature, with explan- 
atory notes in English. 

Dr. Graciela P. Nemes has been in- 
vited to contribute an article for the 
memorial volume to be published in 
India celebrating the Rabindranath Ta- 
gore centenary. Contributors include 
several Nobel prize laureates. Mrs. 
Nemes will trace Tagore's influence on 
the Spanish poet Jimenez. 

Dr. Douglas W. Alden, Head of the 
Department of Foreign Languages, is 
General Editor of the 1961 Bibliog- 
raphy for the Study of Contemporary 
French Literature, joint publication by 
the French VII Section of the Modern 
Language Association of American and 
the French Institute in New York. 

College of 

BUSINESS AND 
PIJ BT T C 
ADMINISTRATION 

Dean James H. Reid 

Personal Notes 

Stuart Steiner, '59, is enrolled for the 
academic year 1961-62 in the graduate 
program of education and training in 
social work in the School of Social 
Welfare at the Florida State University. 

David J. Kelly, '53, has been ap- 
pointed KDKA Radio News Editor for 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, 
Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Frank T. DeLauretis, '54, has been 
appointed Instructor in Economics at 
Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Warren H. Eierman, '43, has been 
elected Senior Vice President of The 
First National Bank of Miami, Florida 
in charge of business development. 
Formerly a Vice President of The 
Hanover Bank in New York City. 

Robert A. Will, '50, has been ap- 
pointed Manager of Plant Location Sur- 
veys for the Austin Company, Engineers 
and Builders, Cleveland, Ohio. 

College of 

ENGINEERING 

R. M. G innings 



News of Recent Graduates 

David H. Carpenter (CE '55) is now 
working for the United States Geolog- 
ical Survey, located in the Engineering 
Building of the University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 

Thomas R. Evans (EE '54) has joined 
White Electromagnetics, Inc., as a senior 



engineer. He is now working as project 
engineer in the Research Division. 

Tom is also lecturing in mathematics 
at the University of Maryland. 

Peter G. Magiros (Ch.E. '51) re- 
ceived his Ph.D. from the University 
of Houston and is now working for Olin 
Mathieson Chemical Corporation. He 
presented a paper entitled "Entrainment 
and Pressure Drop in Concurrent Gas- 
Liquid Flow — Liquid Property and Mo- 
mentum Effects" at the Seventh Mid- 
western Conference on Fluid Mechan- 
ics, Kellogg Center for Continuing Ed- 
ucation, Michigan State University, East 
Lansing, Michigan. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A halt 



Student Activities 

David C. Berry received the Advanced 
Graduate Specialist Certificate, the first 
person to complete the requirements for 
this program since it began in 1960. 

The following students were candi- 
dates for Homecoming Queen: Jean 
Weaver (Queen), Elaine Ricca, Ruth 
Hatfield and Karen Moomey. 

Charles Davis, senior in Education, is 
an alternate member of the team repre- 
senting the University of Maryland on 
the TV program, "The College Bowl," 
appearing January 21, 1961. 

Moses S. Koch, Dean of Essex Com- 
munity College, received his Doctor of 
Education degree from the University 
of Maryland in June. 

Mrs. Eleanor Pincus Karpe, a grad- 
uate student in the College of Educa- 
tion, has contributed an article "Cook- 
ing Capers" to The Instructor Magazine 
(October 1961 issue). 

At the annual Honors Convocation 
of the University of Maryland one hun- 
dred and eight students were recognized 
as having attained outstanding schol- 
arship. 

Mrs. Robert W. Floyd, 27, Nursery 
School Teacher at Sligo Nursery School, 
formerly Nancy Darlene Hall who grad- 
uated from the University of Maryland, 
B.S., 1956, died on December 3 after 
an illness of three weeks. Nancy, fol- 
lowing graduation, taught first grade 
at the Riverdale elementary school for 
two years. She was a member of Alpha 
Chi Omega sorority. Her hobby was 
painting. 

John J. Tracy, Jr., graduate of the 
University of Maryland, 1961, com- 
pleted the radio maintenance course at 
The Infantry School. Fort Benning, 
Georgia, on December 14. He entered 
the Army last July and completed basic 
training at Fort Dix. At Maryland he 
was a member of the Tau Kappa Epsi- 
lon fraternity. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



Faculty Activities 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson. Dean of the 
College of Education, participated in a 
panel on curriculum at Columbia Uni- 
versity which was sponsored by the De- 
partment of Curriculum and Teaching, 
discussed with the supervisors and prin- 
cipals of Anne Arundel County the sub- 
ject of curriculum and addressed the 
Maryland Congress of Parents and 
Teachers 1961 Convention in Baltimore 
on the subject "Exciting Developments 
in Curriculum Improvements." 

Dr. Jean Grambs, Associate Professor 
in Education, addressed the Metropoli- 
tan Washington Chapter of Delta Kappa 
Gamma on the highly controversial sub- 
ject, "Education for Women." 

Dr. Orval L. Ulry, Professor of Edu- 
cation and Director of Summer School, 
addressed the Buck Lodge Junior High 
School PTA on "Education in the Six- 
ties — New Developments." 

Dr. Walter B. Waetjen, Professor of 
Education, Institute for Child Study, re- 
ports the following publications: (from 
professional publications) "Some Fac- 
tors Influencing Learning." "Myth and 
Fact About Learning," "Myths About 
Learning," "Learning — Myth and Fact," 
"Helping Youth Achieve Educational 
Goals." (Education, Educational Lead- 
ership, Baltimore Bulletin of Education. 
Pedagogical Reporter, The Maryland 
Teacher.) He also contributed the fol- 
lowing. Human Variability and Learn- 
ing, ASCD March 1961 and Research 
Frontiers in the Study of Children's 
Learning, May 1961, University of Wis- 
consin Milwaukee Research Bulletin. 



Dr. Gladys S. Wuggin, Professor oi 
Education, participated in the Library 
Workshop under the sponsorship oi the 

USAKLIK Special Services. She dis- 
cussed the topic "Education ( ourses for 
Post-Militan ( Career." 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Dean Selma Lippeatt 

Col i lot Noi is 

Dean Selma F. Lippeatl served as home 
economics consultant for two confer- 
ences of the Food and Agriculture Or- 
ganization of United Nations held in 
Rome and Geneva November 2 I -28. 

Ruth Lee Clarke. Council President, 
discussed alumni relations with seniors 
in the College of Home Economics in 
November. 

Presently Mary Root, a graduating 
senior, is preparing special recipes for 
use with patients suffering from phcnyl- 
ketoneuria. This disease, discovered only 
recently, is currently found in infants 
and is known to be one cause of mental 
deficiency. The work in the College is 
being done under the direction of Mary 
S. Eheart in the Department of Food 
and Nutrition. 

T. Faye Mitchell, Head of the De- 
partment of Textiles and Clothing, has 
been granted a three-months leave for 
a study-tour of the Far East effective 
February 20. 

A Gourmet Food Institute, co-spon- 
sored by the College of Home Econom- 



ics and l niversity ( ollege, will be held 
on Saturday mornings from February 

I7-M.i\ 2. I he varied program seeks to 

combine a humanistic and aesthetic 
approach to food. Ruth Sheldon and 
Rosemary Cornelius v^ ill be director! 

assisted by the < ollege faculty and st.iti 
I in. i Riedel < hapman w.n appointed 

in October to the position ot Supervis- 
ing Director oi Home Economics, D 

C. Public Schools. At the same time she 
was named State Director ol Home I 

nomics lor the District ot ( olumbia 



School of 

LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reibluh 



I he annual banquet ot the Alumni As- 
sociation of the Law School will be 
held on Saturday evening. April 7 at 
7 P.M. at the Sheraton Belvedere Hotel 
in Baltimore. Lxcept for the annual 
election of officers, the entire banquet 
will be dedicated to the honor of Dean 
Roger Howell who is retiring at the end 
of June 1962. The toastmaster will be 
Hon. Emory H. Niles. Chief Judge of 
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City 
(law class of '17) and outgoing Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association. The 
principal speaker will be Professor A. 
James Casner of the Harvard Law 
School, who was a professor at Mary- 
land from 1930-35. 

For election at the banquet, the nom- 
inating committee, consisting of Hon. 
(Continued on next page) 



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January-February, J 962 



17 



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Mary Arabian, '44, Wilmer H. Driver, 
"32, Hon. Edwin Harlan. "34, George V. 
Parkhurst. '33, David S. Sykes, "35, has 
nominated the following alumni for the 
following offices for the year 1962-63: 

President, Hon. W. Albert Menchine, 
'29 

First Vice-President, Hon. Joseph L. 
Carter, '25 

Second Vice-President, Thomas N. 
Berry, '40 

Third Vice-President, Samuel J. 
Fisher, Esq., '09 

Secretary-Treasurer, G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, '29 
Executive Committee 

Samuel W. Barrick, Esq., '52 

Perry G. Bowen, Jr., Esq., '50 

Frederick R. Buck, Esq., '49 

Clare Green Duckett, '34 

Benjamin A. Earnshaw, Esq., '38 

Fred C. Malkus, Esq., '38 

James A. Pine, Esq., '44 

Emmas S. Robertson, '40 

H. Paul Rome, Esq., '21 

Hon. Edward D. E. Rollins, '22 

Any additional nominations made under 
the constitution may be submitted to the 
Secretary, Prof. G. Kenneth Reiblich, at 
the University of Maryland, School of 
Law, Redwood and Greene Streets, Bal- 
timore 1, Maryland. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Howard Hall 

Dean Stone announces the beginning 
of remodeling of Howard Hall, the new 
Basic Science and Research building. 
Remodeling is to take about a year, with 
occupancy expected Feb. 1, 1963. 

Medical Alumni in the News 

Kermit E. Osserman, M.D., widely 
known for his work in myasthenia 
gravis, received a prize from the Amer- 
ican Medical Association for his re- 
search and for the excellence of his 
exhibit on myasthenia gravis at the 1961 



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the Maryland Magazine 



Annual AMA Convention in New York. 
Dr. Osserman is the author of a scien- 
tific article on myasthenia, appearing in 
the January 1962 edition of the Bulletin 
of the School of Medicine. 

Doctor Operates at Sea 

Dr. Phillip A. Insley, MD '34, a Salis- 
bury surgeon, performed a major opera- 
tion on the passenger liner S.S. United 
States. 

The liner was about 400 miles off the 
coast of Ireland en route to New York 
from England when Dr. Insley removed 
a blood clot from the leg of a seaman. 
The ship's doctor was an internist and 
not a surgeon, and so he was asked to 
perform the operation. 

Medical Alumni Day 

Appropriate attention is being given the 
program for the annual Alumni reunion 
by a Committee composed of Drs. C. 
Parke Scarborough (Chairman), D. 
Frank Kaltreider, and Ephraim T. Lisan- 
sky. A detailed program will be mailed 
each alumnus. The Reunion will con- 
vene on June 7. 

Honor Alumnus for 1962 

A Committee headed by Dr. Austin H. 
Wood has nominated Dr. Arthur Ray- 
mond Casilli of the Class of 1914 to be 
the recipient of the 1962 Alumni Honor 
Award and Gold Key. 

Dr. Casilli, a native of Italy, served 
his internship at the Newark City Hos- 
pital and has since practiced pathology 
in the vicinity of Elizabeth, N. J., for 
many years. 

Fifty Year Graduates 

At the ceremonies on Alumni Day, 
members of the Classes of 1912 will 
receive their 50- Year Certificates. It is 
highly desirable that as many of the 
Class of 1912 as can make the trip to 
Baltimore will be present at the cere- 
monies to receive in person the 50- Year 
Honor Certificate. The Alumni of the 
Class of 1912 of the three schools is 
listed below. 



Class of 1912 

University of Maryland School of 
Medicine 

Robert Ephraim Abell 

Grove Hill, Chester, S. C. 
Asa W. Adkins 

361 Hillsboro St., Lexington, Ky. 
Reese Alexander Allgood 

Pickens, S. C. 
Geo. Cullen Battle 

1824 Pendleton St., Columbia, S. C. 
Grover Cleveland Beard 

Atkinson, N. C. 
Robert Alex. Bonner, Jr. 

51 W. Main St., Waterbury 2, Conn. 
Sidney Eli Buchanan 

390 Union St., Concord, N. C. 
{Continued on next page) 




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January-February, 1962 



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Chas. Peter Clautice 

3013 St. Paul St., Baltimore 18, Md. 
Russell Hardy Dean, Ir. 

2442 Atlantic Blvd., Jacksonville 2, Fla. 
Harry Deibel 

1226 Hanover St., Baltimore 30, Md. 
Ernest Wm. Frey 

1928 Penna. Ave., Baltimore 17, Md. 
Dawson Orme George 

Denton. Md. 
Albert Goldey 

210 W. 101st St., New York 25, N. Y. 
Simon Geilech Lenzner 

187 Waterman St., Providence 6, R. I. 
William Michel 

1015 Poplar Grove St., Baltimore 16, 

Md. 
Benj. Newhouse 

4213 16th St., N.W., Washington 11, 

D. C. 
Joseph Rottenberg 

20441 Stratford Rd., Detroit 21, Mich. 
Jay D. Sharp 

Shifting Shadows, Twentynine Palms. 

Calif. 
David Silberman 

Riviera Apts. 6 E. 

901 Lake Drive, Baltimore 17, Md. 
John Andrew Skladowsky 

514 Stanford Rd., Baltimore 29, Md. 
Clarke Jackson Stallworth 

Thomaston. Ala. 
Michael Vinciguerra 

604 Westminster Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Edwin Vignes Whitaker 

Box 625, Baton Rouge 8, La. 



Class of 1912 
Baltimore Medical College 

Col. Harry Aloysius Bishop 

3718 Manor Rd., Chevy Chase, Md. 
William Russell Geraghty 

309 Northway, Baltimore 18, Md. 
Charles Jacob Greenstein 

300 Main St., New Britain, Conn. 
John J. H. Hilton 

336 Haverhill St., Lawrence, Mass. 
Samuel Miller 

2807 Arthur St.. Hollywood, Fla. 
Andres Montalvo-Guenard 

107 Parque St.. Santurce, P. R. 
Arquelio Ramierez-Marini 

Box 226, Yauco. Puerto Rico 
William T. Rumage, Sr. 

135 Jefferson St., Newark 5, N. J. 
H. Boyd Wylie 

715 Scarlett Dr., Towson 4, Md. 
A. W. Yocum 

2023 Lanier Dr., Silver Spring, Md. 



Class of 1912 
College of Physicians & Surgeons 

Andrew A. Anderson 

1101 Deseret Bldg., Salt Lake City, Utah 
Asa W. Adkins 

361 Hillsboro St., Lexington, Ky. 
Harry Melchoir Biffar 

144-31 14th Ave., Flushing 57, N. Y. 
Harry L. Brillhart 

1036 Talbot Ave., Jacksonville 5, Fla. 
Joseph Stewart Brown 

239 E. 30th St., Lewiston, Pa. 
Everett Roy Cooper 

Troy. W. Va. 
Col. Joseph Sherman Craig 

Summerville. W. Va. 
A. E. Goldstein 

3505 N. Charles St.. Baltimore 18, Md. 
Ritchie A. Ireland 

1207 Quarrier St., Charleston 1, W. Va. 
Manuel R. Janer 

697 West End Ave.. New York 25, N. Y. 
Lucian Dale Johnson 

1202 Race St.. Connellsville. Pa. 
Fritz Juette Kimzey 

2700 Harford Rd., Baltimore 18. Md. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



George A. Kohler 

Smithburg, Md. 
Sinclair Simcha Levine 

54 Church St., Hartford. Conn. 
Albert Eugene Mann 

65 Central Park West, New York 23, 

N. Y. 
M. I. Mendelhoff 

240 Capitol St., Charleston I. W. Va. 
Samuel John Morris 

205 Kingwood St., Morgantown, W. Va. 
Silvia Jeremiah Roberts 

1432 N. 2nd St., Harrisburg. Pa. 
Leonard O. Schwartz 

3421 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton. 

W. Va. 
Albert Claudius Shannon 

Mayport, Pa. 
Leo J. Sullivan 

379 Whipple St., Fall River, Mass. 
Harry Wynn Vinicombe 

439 State St., Brooklyn 17, N. Y. 
Mayes B. Williams 

2000 Eoff St., Wheeling, W. Va. 
James Edward Wilson 

40 E. Pike St.. Canonsburg, Pa. 
Curtis Levi Zimmerman 

412 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



School of 

NURSING 



Joan White 



Dr. Sanderson, Assistant Director 

This Fall the Nurses Alumnae Associa- 
tion introduced Dr. Marjorie E. Sander- 
son to its membership. Dr. Sanderson 
is Assistant Director of Nursing Re- 
sources at University Hospital this year. 
She completed her doctoral studies at 
Teachers' College in 1960 and has had 
extensive experience in the field of 
nursing service. The thesis of her talk 
with the Alumnae circumscribed around 
where was the University, where is the 
University, and where will be the Uni- 
versity. Growth in the physical setting 
was depicted with slides, and Dr. San- 
derson illustrated the future hopes for 
University Hospital. 

Facets of Nuclear Nursing 
Illustrated 

The Alumnae were privileged to hear 
LCDR. L. Simon, Head, Division of 
Nuclear Nursing, Department of Nu- 
clear Medicine at the U. S. Naval Med- 
ical School in Bethesda, Maryland. Of 
the many facets in Nuclear Nursing 
illustrated, it was interesting to hear 
that over one million patients receive 
radioactive isotopes per year, of whom 
90% receive them for diagnostic pur- 
poses and 10% for therapeutic purposes. 
The implications of these figures are 
obvious to the changing world of nurs- 
ing. 

Awarded Silver Service 
Recognition Award 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe, Professor of 

Nursing and Dean of the University of 

(Continued on next page) 




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Maryland School of Nursing, was pre- 
sented with the Silver Service Recogni- 
tion Award at the annual meeting of 
the Maryland Heart Association on No- 
vember 30, 1961. This award was for 
"grateful recognition of dedicated ser- 
vice in advancing the fight against 
diseases of the heart and circulation." 



School of 

PHARMACY 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
Dr. B. Olive Cole 



Faculty Notes 

Dr. Raymond M. Burgison, Associate 
Professor of Pharmacology, has been 
honored recently by his appointment as 
a Consultant in Chemical Pharmacology 
to the National Institute of Mental 
Health, and as a member of the National 
Advisory Council on Preclinical Psycho- 
pharmacology of the N.I.M.H. Dr. Bur- 
gison has recently become a member, 
also, of the International Advisory Board 
of the new journal: Chemotherapy Re- 
search Bulletin. 

Two eminently successful textbooks 
written by members of the Department 
of Pharmacology have recently appeared 
in new editions. Pharmacological Prin- 
ciples of Medical Practice by John C. 
Krantz, Jr. and C. Jelleff Carr is now in 
its 5th edition, published by Williams & 
Wilkins Co., Baltimore. The second edi- 
tion of Modern Pharmacology and Ther- 
apeutics by Ruth D. Musser and Joseph 
G. Bird has been published by the Mac- 
millan Co., N. Y. Mrs. Musser is Assist- 
ant Professor of Pharmacology. Dr. Bird 
is an alumnus of the School of Medicine 
and received his Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in the Department of Pharma- 
cology. 

Drs. Harutada Ninomiya and Moritz 
Michaelis attended the First Interna- 
tional Pharmacological Meeting held in 
Stockholm, Sweden during the summer. 
Drs. Ninomiya and Michaelis described 
their experiments relating to the bio- 
chemical mechanism of shock and dis- 
turbances of dehydrogenase activity de- 
rived therefrom. 

Faculty Attend National Meetings 

Dr. Francis M. Miller, Professor of 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, attended 
the Seventeenth National Organic 
Chemistry Symposium at Indiana Uni- 
versity. This five-day meeting, in which 
new ideas and discoveries in the field 
of organic chemistry were discussed, 
was sponsored by the American Chemi- 
cal Society. 

During the past summer Dr. Ralph 
Shangraw, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy, represented the University of 



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the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland, School of Pharmacy, at the 
Pharmacy Teachers Seminar held at the 
University of Wisconsin from July 9th 
to 15th. The conference, sponsored In 
the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy, specifically concerned the 
content of the professional courses in 
the new five-year pharmacy curriculum 
which became mandatory for all schools 
of pharmacy in I960. 

The first section of the program con- 
sisted of a study of course syllabi, in 
particular those pertaining to physical 
pharmacy and dosage form evaluation. 
A majority of the seminar consisted of 
technical talks on problems of interest 
to pharmacy educators. These in- 
cluded lectures by Dr. Joseph Swon- 
towsky of Smith, Kline and French 
Laboratories on sustained release medi- 
cation and biologic half-life, Dr. 
Kenneth Wilson of the U.S. Army 
Chemical Center on percutaneous ab- 
sorption, Robert Mattoon of Abbott 
Laboratories on Formation and Proper- 
ties of Films, and Dr. Lewis Schanker 
of the National Heart Institute on ab- 
sorption from the intestinal tract. 

Preceding the pharmacy seminar, a 
two-day meeting of the History of Phar- 
macy teachers was held and Dr. 
Shangraw also attended these meetings. 

Dr. Nicolas Zenker, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, at- 
tended the First Annual Conference on 
Pharmaceutical Analysis in Land 
O'Lakes, Wis., September 17-20, 1961. 
The meeting was sponsored by the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin Extension Division 
in cooperation with the School of Phar- 
macy of the University of Wisconsin. 

The first day of the meeting was de- 
voted to a discussion of fluorescence 
analysis. After the presentation of 
theoretical aspects of fluorescence by 
R. T. Williams and S. Udenfriend, prac- 
tical aspects of rluorimetric analysis and 
X-ray fluorescence were discussed. 

On the second day of the meeting, 
basic gas chromatographic theory was 
explained by Dr. Dal Nogare. After a 
discussion of modern gas chroma- 
tographic instrumentation, the useful- 
ness of gas chromatographic techniques 
was illustrated by its applications on 
biochemical and pharmaceutical an- 
alysis. 

The meeting was concluded with a 
discussion of the status of the phar- 
maceutical analyst and the organization 
of analytical facilities in the pharma- 
ceutical industry. 

Mr. Dean E. Leavitt. Instructor of 
the School of Pharmacy at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, has completed on- 
the-scene studies of a modern drug 
store organization in Walgreen's sixth 
Seminar in Pharmacy Administration. 

The two-week program held at the 
firm's headquarters in Chicago, June 
19-30, included extensive discussion ses- 
sions with veteran Walgreen executives 
plus field trips through the company's 
stores, warehouse, and drug and cos- 



metic manufacturing laboratory. With 
Mr. Leavitt were faculty representatives 
from 13 other leading pharmacj col- 
leges. 

The over 30 different Business sub- 
jects under studs ranged from effective 
store design to personnel selection and 

training, to merchandising, advertising, 
tax and legal questions 

As a meeting ground between educa- 
tors and business administrators. Wal- 
green's Seminar offered the forum for 
a stimulating exchange of ideas on the 
business aspects of pharmacy. Many 
new concepts in current retailing tech- 
niques, covered in the Seminar, will be 
incorporated in classroom study this 
fall to further help students prepare for 
successful drugstore management. 

Dr. Frank J. Slama. Professor of 
Pharmacognosy, attended the annual 
meeting of the American Society of 
Pharmacognosy which was held at the 
University of Houston. Various papers 
were presented, as for example. "Oppor- 
tunities for Ph.D. Pharmacognosists." 
"Thin Film Chromotography," "Uridine 
Nucleotides in Glycoside Biosynthesis," 
"Chemotaxonomy of Select Groups 
Within the Coniferae"; also research on 
southwestern drug plants and phar- 
macognosy of the recently accepted 
anti-cancer plants. 

Appointment of Dr. Thompson 
Announced 

The appointment of Dr. Robert E. 
Thompson as Director of the Schering 
Corporation's Research and Develop- 
ment Division, at Bloomfield & Union, 
N. J., has been announced by Dr. Harry 
M. Weaver, Vice-president. Dr. Thomp- 
son will also be responsible for the tran- 
sition from research to full production 
of all pharmaceutical compounds mar- 
keted by the Schering Corporation. 

Dr. Thompson received the B.S. de- 
gree in Pharmacy and the M.S. and 
Ph.D. degrees in Pharmacology from 
the University of Maryland, and served 
as assistant pharmacologist in the School 
of Pharmacy from 1938 to 1943. 

For some fifteen years he served as 
chief research pharmacologist and direc- 
tor of pharmacy for the Armour Phar- 
maceutical Company. 

UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

G. Allen Soger 

Completes MBA At University of 
Pittsburgh 

Mr. Dominic Paul Mainieri, '57, B.S. 
in Military Studies, has completed re- 
quirements for the Master of Business 
Administration at the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

In a recent letter to Dean Leon 
Smith of Maryland's College of Arts 
and Sciences, Dr. Paul B. Kohberger, 
(Continued on next page) 



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Director of Graduate Programs for the 
Pittsburgh Graduate School of Busi- 
ness, praised the Maryland program. 
He said: 

"Mr. Mainieri's scholastic achieve- 
ment was above average, and, in the 
future, we certainly would like to see 
young men of the same calibre entering 
our graduate program from your 
school." 

Mr. Mainieri completed his degree 
requirements in the spring of 1957 while 
stationed at Mildenhall, England. 

Colonel George B. Simler 

Colonel George B. Simler, '48, has been 
assigned recently as the Commander 
of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa. This 
base, the largest in the Pacific Air 
Forces, is also an important center of 
the University's Far East Program. 
Kadena's Education Services Program, 
headed by Philemon E. Head, is one of 
the leading programs in the Far East, 
with a current Maryland enrollment of 
575. Colonel Simler expressed his views 
in these terms: "I am interested, not 
only as a Maryland graduate, but also 
as a commander who appreciates the 
genuine value of the program in helping 
meet the educational requirements of 
the Air Force." 

Personal Notes 

Major Roman J. Lutz, '58, has been 
promoted to Associate Professor at the 
State University of Iowa. 

Major Edward F. Rudowske, '57, has 
been assigned to Robins Air Force Base 
as Commander of Headquarters Squad- 
ron Section. 

Major Daniel J. Murphy, '60, is as- 
signed to the U. S. Army Element, De- 
fense Communications Agency, in 
Washington, D. C. 

Lt. Col. William L. Brinson, '56, has 
been selected as Commander of one of 
the United States Air Force's first all- 
jet strategic airlift units, the 44th Air 
Transport Squadron. 

Major Jerome J. Repsher (USA), BS 
'59, is completing an assignment in Cam- 
bodia. He was recently promoted from 
the grade of Captain. 

Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Allen R. Fredine. 
BS '57, is completing a tour with the 
U. S. Army in Korea. He is a 1936 
graduate of Bethel Theological Semi- 
nary, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

A former University College student, 
Mr. Martin G. Heller, has formed the 
Heller Industries, Inc. to manufacture 
precision devices for the electronics in- 
dustry. Mr. Heller has since done grad- 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



uate work at the New York University 
College of Engineering. 

Mr. Douglas A. Nemier, BA '61, is 
now pursuing a master's degree in His- 
tory at the University of Maryland. He 
was recently initiated into Phi Alpha 
Theta, honorary history fraternity, and 
Pi Alpha Sigma, honorary Political 
Science fraternity. 

Lawrence E. Arnold, UC '58, recently 
completed the commissary operations 
course at Fort Lee, Virginia. He is also 
a 1933 graduate of Blinn Memorial 
College, Brenham, Texas. His home is 
in San Antonio. 

Lt. Col. Charles F. Austin, UC '58, 
recently completed the Senior Officer 
Advanced Operations Course at the 
Command and General Staff College, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He also 
holds a master's degree in Business Ad- 
ministration from Howard University. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 



August Kiel, Jr. 

The death of Dr. August Kiel, Jr., on 
October 4, 1961 came as an inexplicable 
tragedy to all those who knew him. 
Only 37 at his death, Dr. Kiel was one 
of the young, able members of the De- 
partment of Neurosurgery. In a few 
short years he had endeared himself to 
a host of friends and grateful patients. 

Born in Baltimore, Dr. Kiel graduated 
from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute 
and Loyola College. He then entered 
the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and was a member of the class 
of 1946. After his rotating internship 
at Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, he served 
as a medical officer in the Navy for 
two years. On his return to civilian life 
he took a year of general surgery at 
Mercy and then entered the Neurosur- 
gical Residency program at the Univer- 
sity Hospital, Baltimore. Upon comple- 
tion of his Residency, Dr. Kiel entered 
the private practice of Neurosurgery 
in Baltimore, being affiliated with six 
hospitals and being in charge of the 
Neurosurgical Service at Mercy Hos- 
pital. 

Throughout his years in practice, Dr. 
Kiel was respected for his professional 
ability and his unsophisticated, honest 
appraisal of patients and problems; but 
it was his gentle kindness that made his 
patients look upon him as something 
more than a physician. Although, when 
necessary, he would point out an error 
or injustice without undue restraint, this 
was done with such understanding that 
he invariably retained the friendship of 
"the opposition." This understanding 
and kindness was felt and appreciated 
{Continued on next page) 




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by all those with whom he came in 
contact, whether patient, professional 
associate, or house officer. 

To those who knew him well. Dr. 
Kiel's sense of humor was legendary. 
Never one to miss the opportunity of 
a humorous situation, or make one if 
necessary, he kept every one from tak- 
ing himself or his situation too seri- 
ously. And yet, as the true Christian 
he was, his "needles"' had no barbs, his 
caricatures no malice. 

Truly his widow and four sons may 
be justly proud of his memory and those 
of us fortunate enough to know him will 
long remember his example. Perhaps the 
most fitting tribute is the recollection 
that in our 12 years of close association, 
we had one argument — I was wrong — 
he apologized. 

ROBERT M. N. CROSBY, M.D. 



Maurice Feldman 

Maurice Feldman, '16, of Baltimore, 
died on the 21st of October 1961. He 
was 68. 

For many years Dr. Feldman served 
as Assistant Professor of Gastroenterol- 
ogy at the School of Medicine and in 
this specialty he was also certified by 
the American Board of Gastroenterol- 
ogy. Dr. Feldman was the author of four 
editions of a textbook entitled The Clin- 
ical Roentgenology of the Digestive 
Tract and at the time of his death a 
fifth edition was in preparation. For 
many years Dr. Feldman was active in 
the practice of radiology. He was also 
in considerable demand as a lecturer, 
both at home and abroad. He was the 
founder of the Medical Research Club 
of Baltimore and was the author of 
many scientific papers concerned prin- 
cipally with his own research relating to 
the roentgenelogy of and treatment of 
diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. He 
is survived by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Feldman and two sons, Dr. Charles 
Feldman of Alexandria, Va., and Dr. 
Maurice Feldman, Jr., of Baltimore. 



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26 



the Maryland Magazine 



John W. Ai brittain 

John Warren Albrittain, '35, Captain, 
Medical Corps, U. S. Navy. He was 
stationed at the Bureau of Medicine and 
Surgery in Washington. 

Susanne Sterling 

Susanne Sterling (Mrs. Robert Ashton), 
'31, of Baltimore, Md. Dr. Sterling was 
52. 

A native of Crisfield, Md., she served 
her internship at the Hospital for the 
Women of Maryland and the Baltimore 
City Hospitals and was later resident in 
obstetrics at the Union Memorial Hos- 
pital. 



Benjamin S. Abeshouse 

Dr. Benjamin S. Abeshouse, who for 
many years taught urologic pathology 
at the School of Medicine, died recently. 
Dr. Abeshouse served as Urologist-in- 
Chief of the Sinai Hospital. 



Dr. Emmet R. Bucklew 

Dr. Emmet R. Bucklew, Med. '04, died 
at Veterans Administration Center, 
Mountain Home, Tennessee. 

Dr. Bucklew practiced medicine for 
nearly fifty years in Taylor County, 
West Virginia, specializing in major 
surgery. 



Maj. Gen. Russell P. Hartle 

Major General Russell P. Hartle, '10. 
who led the first contingent of American 
troops into Europe in World War II, 
died at 72. 

Gen. Hartle retired in 1946 after 36 
years of service. He was a resident of 
Hagerstown, Maryland. 



Jose Davila Lopez 

Jose Davila Lopez, '42, of Ponce, 
Puerto Rico. Dr. Lopez was a diplomate 
of the American Board of Orthopedic 
Surgery and a Fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons. He was a member 
of the American Medical Association 
and of the Puerto Rico Medical Asso- 
ciation. 

[Continued on next page) 



Send Personal News to Your 
College Correspondent Listed 
on Page 7. 



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27 



Cornelius Whalin 

Cornelius Whalin. LL.B. "38. an Attor- 
ney tor Prince Georges County and 
( Councilman for College Park, died at 
the age of 46. 

Mr. Whalin was active in the Hyatts- 
ville Civitan Club, past Governor of 
the Chesapeake district of Civitan Inter- 
national. Vice President of the Salva- 
tion Army Board in Prince Georges, and 
a member of the Presbyterian Church. 



Dr. F. L. McCartney 

Frank L. McCartney, who received the 
Phar. D. degree from the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy (now the School 
of Pharmacy, University of Maryland) 
in 1903. died at Sarasota, Florida, on 
September 12, 1961, at the age of 
eighty. 

He began his career as a prescription- 
ist with Hynson, Westcott & Company, 
Baltimore, and was with Sharp & 
Dohmne in their laboratories in Balti- 
more and later in New York in charge 
of sales in Greater New York, Long 
Island, West Chester and New Jersey. 

During World War I Dr. McCartney 
was Captain in the Medical Department, 
U. S. A. as buyer of drugs and chem- 
icals; then as Major in charge of Gen- 
eral Purchasing Office of Medical De- 
partment, Washington, D. C; and final- 
ly, after the Armistice, was assigned to 
P. S. & T. General Staff in cancellation 
of war contracts, as Lt. Col. N.A.R.C. 

He was with the Monsanta Pharmacal 
Company from 1919 to 1924, and with 
the Norwich Pharmacal Company from 
1924 to 1946, of which he was presi- 
dent from 1938 to 1946. 

On June 8, 1946 he was the recipient 
of the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Science by the University of Maryland. 

Dr. McCartney was a life member of 
the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion and held membership in many other 
pharmaceutical organizations. He was 
a loyal and interested member of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy, University of Maryland. 



Other Deaths 

David B. Grecngold, MD '36, of Pitts- 
field. Mass. 

John C. Woodland, Pharm. 'I I and MD 
'15, oi Morehead City. N. C. 

Robert F. Kenty, '53-'55, of San Diego, 
Calif. 

Robert A. Carrigan of Silver Spring, Md. 

Morris Bernard Schreiber, '29, of Ella- 
inont kil.. Baltimore. Md. 

Morris Tannenbaum, '29, of Bronx, 
N. Y. 



Ellsworth E. Light, '16, of Alton Bay. 
N. H. 

William C. Williams, '17, of Hillsville, 
Va. Dr. Williams was 73. 

Francisco Franceschi Caballero, '19, of 
San Juan, Puerto Rico. Dr. Caballero 
specialized in gastroenterology. 

Charles R. Goldsborough, '19, of Balti- 
more, Md. 

George Gregory Keefe, '22, of Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Lawrence Wells Lawson, '22, of Logan, 
W. Va. 

Marion Y. Keith, '23. of Greensboro, 
N. C. 

A. L. Daughtridge, '24, of Rocky Moun- 
tain, N. C. Dr. Daughtridge was 60. 

James Joseph O'Connor, '07, of Oly- 
phant, Pa. 

George Delbert Johnson, P & S '08, 
Huntington, W. Va. Dr. Johnson was 
78. 

Scott J. Titus, B.M.C. '08, of Jefferson, 
Pa. Dr. Titus was 78. 

Harold Henderson Talbott, P & S '09, 
of Toronto, Ohio. Dr. Talbot was 76. 

Cleland Granger Moore, '09, of Glen- 
dale, Calif. Dr. Moore was 78. 

James Costas Diaz, '10, of Ponce, Puerto 
Rico. 

William Brandon, '14, Statesville, N. C. 
Dr. Brandon was 72. 

James I. Justice, '15, of East Liberty, 
Ohio. 

Frederick Stephen Senning, '47, of 
Arnold, Md. 

James F. Condron, '48. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harry M. Mattax, '49, Salisbury, Md. 

School of Pharmacy 
(Since June 1961) 

John P. Corbett, Ph. G. 
Clara Herskowitz, Ph. G. 
M. Ellsworth Kauffman, Phar. D. 
Leroy Reichert, Ph. G. 
George Lemke, Phar. D. 
Edwin A. Schmidt, Ph. G. 
Katherine Parker Gakenheimer, B.S. in 
Pharmacy. 

William Henry McGreevy, P & S '97, 

of Jamaica, Long Island. Dr. Mc- 
Greevy was 95. 
Benjamin Franklin Moyers, B.M.C. '97, 

of 6901 Pineway, Hyattsville, Md. Dr. 

Moyers was 90. 
W. E. Echols, B.M.C. '98, of Richwood, 

W. Va. 
Charles Edward Snyder, '02, of Stevens- 

ville, Md. Dr. Snyder was 81. 
A. Lee Hickok, B.M.C. '03, of Birchard- 

ville, Pa. Dr. Hickok was 84. 
Frank S. Cooper, '03, of Roanoke, Va. 
John Flynn. P & S '04, of Erie, Pa. Dr. 

Flynn was 87. 
John W. Parker, Jr., '05, of Jacksonville, 

Fla. Dr. Parker was 81. 
John Pierson, '05, of Baltimore, Md. 
Henry Blank, '06, of Aurora, Col. 
John Joseph Egan, '07, Waterbury, 

Conn. 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 18 

Alcazar 26 

American Disinfectant Co 24 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Products Co.. Inc 21 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 26 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 25 

Asphalt Service Co., Inc 22 

Atchison & Keller, Inc 23 



Baltimore Envelope Co 20 

Bard Avon School 20 



Bergmann's Laundry 



24 



Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 24 



Bon Ton Food Products 
Briggs Construction Co.. 



Inc. 



19 
26 



Briggs & Company. Meat Products 24 



Thomas E. Carroll & Son 27 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 26 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 17 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 22 



Del Haven White House Motel 



19 



Farmers Cooperative Assn 22 

J. H. Filbert Co 26 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 19 

John G. Fitzgerald. Plumbing and Heating . 23 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 24 



Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 18 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 22 



Harvey Dairy 27 

Hotel Harrington 20 

The House of Sound 22 



Johnston. Lemon & Co 25 



Kidwell & Kidvvell, Inc 25 

King Bros., Inc 27 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 23 



Lustine Chevrolet 27 



Maria's Restaurant 23 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 24 

Massey-Furguson, Inc 25 

Modern Machinists Co 22 



McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 20 



Norman Motor Co. 27 

North Washington Press. Inc 26 

Northrop Inside Back Cover 



Occidental Restaurant 18 

i lies Envelope Corp. 21 

Olney Inn 21 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc 19 



Park Transfer Co. 



Inc. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 
Schluderberg- Kurdle Co.. 
Sealtest Foods 
Seidenspinner Realtor 
Silver Hill Sand & Gravel I'm, 

Smith Welding Co., Inc 

Strayer I lollege 

Student's Supply Store 

Suburban Trust Co 

Sweetheart Bread 



Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 



Wallop & Sun. Insurance 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 

Perry 0. Wilkinson, Insurance 

J. Mi Kenny Willis & Smi. Inc 



24 
26 
21 
26 
20 
26 
24 
22 
18 
21 



25 



]'< 



20 
24 
16 



Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



Do you share his driving determination to know? 











An unsolved problem is a nagging challenge to him. The word "impossible" is an impertinence. 

Are you tired of predigested answers? Anxious to get at work no one else has ever done? Then come to Northrop 
where you can find men like this to grow with. Work side by side with them on such projects as interplanetary navi- 
gation and astronertial guidance systems, aerospace deceleration and landing systems, magnetogasdynamics for space 
propulsion, in-space rendezvous, rescue, repair and refueling techniques, laminar flow control, universal automatic 
test equipment, and world-wide communications systems. 

More than 70 such programs are now on the boards at Northrop, with many challenging problems still to be solved, 
and new areas of activity constantly opening up for creative research. ma ^^ ■% B W H | I W% f% W% 

If you want to know more about the Northrop challenge, drop us a line at 
Box 1525, Beverly Hills, California, and mention your area of special interest. an equal opportunity employer 



Maryland Alumni European Tour 




HERE WE GO AGAIN! Th e S =c- 

oncl annual Maryland Alumni European Tour will offer 
three distinctive tours: Central Europe, Scandinavia and 
Iberia. 



The trans-oceanic charter flight will leave from Friendship 
International Airport on June 29, flying directly to London. 
The return trip will be from Paris to Friendship. 



All alumni and their families are eligible to join the char- 
ter tour. For complete itineraries and additional informa- 
tion write: Alumni Office, University of Maryland at 
College Park. Or telephone APpleton 7-5745. 



CENTRAL EUROPEAN 

1 \J LJ fv- London, the Hague, Cologne, Rhine River, 
Weisbaden, Heidelberg, Black Forest, Lucerne, Italian 
Lake District, Venice, Florence, Rome, Pisa, Nice (Monte 
Carlo) and the Riviera, and Paris $895. 

SCANDINAVIA: London, York, Edin- 
burgh, Glasgow, Bergen, Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, 
Hamburg, Amsterdam, Brussels, Waterloo, and Paris $975. 

IrSC/Ivl/V London, Madrid, Lisbon, Seville, Gran- 
ada, Toledo, Palma (Majorca), Barcelona, Nimes, Nice 
(Monte Carlo), and Paris $960. 



June 29 to July 30, 1 962 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



ma^^x^inc * 




Volume XXXIV Number Two • March-April 1962 



Alumni Reappraisal • A Maryland Pioneer • Album of Maryi wn Amii res 



How many of his dreams do you share? 








This man gets paid for dreaming. He seeks out new questions to ask, new goals to aim at. His insights shape the course of 
tomorrow's technology. 

Are you ready to put aside easy answers and help establish new parameters of knowledge? Then come to Northrop. Work 
in such uncluttered areas as space guidance and astro-inertial navigation systems, aerospace deceleration and landing sys- 
tems, man-machine and life-support systems for space, laminar flow control techniques, automatic test equipment or world- 
wide communications systems. With more than 70 such advanced projects on the boards, you'll find all the creative challenge 
you could ask for. 

For more specific information, write to Northrop Corp., Box 1525, Beverly Hills, 
Calif., and mention your field of special interest. You will receive a prompt reply. 



NORTHROP 



the 




magazine 



JVEar'yla.ncl 

■ 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIV Number 2 

THE COVER: A new dormitory complex is being constructed on the 
northern fringe of the College Park campus. Already in use are ( entre- 
ville Hall, the large, nine-story building on the right; Cambridge Hall, the 
five-story building to the left; ( hestertown Hall, facing Cambridge Hall; 
Bel Air Hall, behind Chestcrtown (not visible); and the Dining Hall, 
the low building located in the center of the quadrangle. Cumberland Hall, 
to face Ccntreville, is now under construction and will be completed this 
Fall. When completed these five residence halls will house approximately 
1,600 men and women students, photo by m danegger. 



A, The Alumni Diary 

O Alumni and Campus Notes 

J Dr. Truitt Leads Alumni Reappraisal 

D A Maryland Pioneer 

O Spring Sports Schedule 

y An Album of Maryland Athletes 

1 1 Maryland Books and Authors 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C.WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 

DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFIC E OF FINANCE AND BUSI NESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. EDNA L. MESSERSCHMIDT, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



A DVERT ISI NG DIRECTOR S 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12, Md. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3,1879.-$3.00peryear-Fifty rents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representat1 ves : 

AG R I I' I LTURE 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath, '39 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 

ARTS ■ SCIENCES 

Richard Bourne, '57 
Joseph M. Mathias, '35 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

BUSINESS A PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Chester W. Tawney, '3 1 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 

Dr. Harry Levin, '26 

Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 

Harry Hasslinger, '33 

Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Tracy C. Coleman, '35 
Ben Dyer, '31 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 



Emory H. Niles, '17 

Hon. VV. Albert Menchine, '29 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., '35 
Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Kathryn Prokop Donnelly, '48 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov, '20 
.Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EX-OFF1C10 MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Field Secretary 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

Nurs., '47; Edu., '51 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Frederick County — 

Nelson R. Bonn, '51 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Bcall, '31 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

(arson S. Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



JOHN GLENN IS A FORMER STUDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
He did not take many courses with us, but, like everyone else, we can take 
credit for the great achievement of a national hero. 

On the day of the historic triple orbit, I made one of my many journeys to 
Baltimore. A marker which I had passed a thousand times caught my eye. 
It contained the simple quotation "What hath God Wrought!" commemorating 
the first telegraphic message sent by S. F. B. Morse on May 24, 1844. The 
message went to Baltimore from the old U. S. Supreme Court Room in the 
U. S. Capitol. Little did anyone dream that this message would some day 
be a vital part of man's penetration into the unknown. 

As I am carried about in the whirlpool of activity which is the thirteenth 
largest educational institution in our great Country, and as I reach out to 
the thousands and thousands who have walked through these doors, I must 
reflect on the wonders which education has provided. Each of us can recall 
experiences, inspirations, determinations, and a setting of the sights, achieved 
at the knee of someone admired, respected, or even revered. There is always 
a hand to take for the next step if we are willing to grasp it. 

Many are the mysteries of the future and always the horizon will lengthen 
if we continue to hack away. Those who have visited the tropics will know 
that if you discontinue your labor, the jungle will soon again close in upon 
the clearing you have made. So it is that we who remain a part of the 
University family are joined by those whose minds have been trained in 
this and other institutions to retain the cleared spaces and to extend the 
boundary. We add to and build upon the efforts of others who have labored 
before us. 

We of the Alumni Association, of the University and of the many com- 
munity families fall into a pattern. We have progressed on both trial and 
error, and on planned and proper organization. America, using much the same 
process, has moved ahead on the strong back of our educational system. Even 
the most fertile ground will not produce without first being cleared, con- 
ditioned and cultivated. So it is with the human mind. Perhaps this is why 
we know and appreciate the role of the University in our lives and of our debt 
to those who were such an important part of our growing and achieving 
process. 

Col. Glenn is one who has heaped praise upon the backs of thousands of 
others who made it possible for him to establish an historic milestone. He 
might well prefer another marker which would say, "What hath God wrought!" 
Few would quarrel with such a reaction or desire. Rather, there may well be 
another land or space marker which could read "The world is now a neigh- 
borhood!" 

Even now, man has only a dim view, but who knows, there may yet be on 
our campus the student, the faculty member, the future alumnus, upon whom 
the eyes of our Country, our Planet, our Galaxy may some day be focused. 
We must find him, serve him, and send him forth. Without education, the 
end is in sight! With education, there is no end! 



Sincerely, 




^t__^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



MARCH APRIL 

1-3 Basketball, ACC Tournament, 4 

Away. 
8 S.U. Classical Film Series: 10 

Devil in the Flesh. \ 2 

8 National Symphony. 
14 S.U. Cultural Series: 19 

A Program on Space Exploration. 
16 S.U. Dance. 24 

21 Orchestra Concert. 25 

25 Maryland Day. 



S.U. Cultural Series: 
Author's Party. 
Band Spring Concert. 
S.U. Classical Film Series: 
Rocket from Calahucli. 
Easter Recess Begins After 
Last Class. 

Easter Recess Ends, 8 a.m. 
S.U. Cultural Series: 
The Arts. 



MAY 

I 
S-l 1 



May Day. 

SGA Cultural Series: 

Opera. 
10 S.U. Classical Film Scries: 

Open City. 
16 AFROTC Observance. 

16 S.U. Cultural Series: 
Test lithe Life. 

17 Outdoor Band Concert. 
23 Orchestra Concert. 

30 Memorial Day. Holiday. 



Highest Ranking Student 
is 18 Years Old 

Cadet Lt. Colonel William Bridges 
Smith, currently serving as Inspector 
General for the University of Maryland 
AFROTC Cadet Division, has recently 
been selected to Who's Who in Amer- 
ican Colleges and Universities. Mr. 
Smith will graduate from the University 
of Maryland in June, 1962 at the age of 
18 with a degree in Electrical Engi- 
neering. He will also be commissioned 
a Second Lieutenant in the United States 
Air Force upon graduation in June. Mr. 
Smith is currently the highest ranking 
male student at the University with a 
grade average of 3.92.* 

Mr. Smith's accomplishments at the 
University include the following awards: 
Handbook Award for highest average 
in Freshman Chemistry; Reserve Offi- 
cers Association Medal for top Soph- 
omore AFROTC Cadet academic aver- 
age; Dinah Berman Medal for top 
sophomore engineering academic aver- 
age; Handbook Award for top soph- 
omore physics average; and First Hon- 
ors Convocation for outstanding ac- 
ademic record. (4.0 sophomore aver- 
age.) 

* As computed in the selection of candidates 
for Phi Kappa Phi, national university-wide 
scholastic honor society. 




Mr. Smith 



His participation in campus activities 
include: Secretary, ODK; President. 
HKN; Senior Advisor and Vice Presi- 
dent, 0HE; Publicity Chairman. TBTI: 
Pledge Chairman, Scabbard and Blade: 
Member, 0K0; President, Chess Club; 
Captain, Chess Team; Vice President. 
Society of American Military Engineers: 



Member, Institute of Radio Engineers: 
Member, University Club: Member. 
Society of Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Member. Canterbury Societj : 
State Treasurer, D.C State Society. 
Children of American Revolution: 
Graduate, Cadet Leadership Academy: 
and Justice. Central Student Court. 

Mr. Smith has travelled over a great 
portion of the world with his father. 
Henry Leroy Smith, who was a military 
officer and military attache. 

The Smiths reside in College Park. 
Maryland. 

Alumnus Launches New 
Baseball Magazine 

Bert R. Sugar. '57 has become editor 
and publisher of Baseball Monthly, a 
new national publication devoted to 
coverage of baseball exclusively. The 
new magazine, with offices at 514 10th 
Street. N.W.. Washington. D.C. made 
its debut in February. 

Sugar received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree at the University of Maryland in 
1957 and an L.L.B. at the University of 
Michigan in 1960. 

He lives in Washington with his wife, 
Suzanne Davis. They have one child. 
Jennifer Anne, one year o\d. 



March- April, J 962 



Baltimore Alumni Club to Meet at Student Union 



The Maryland Magazine goes to 
press, Virgil Horace Harrison, Associate 
Professor of Government and Politics, 
-cheduled to address the Alumni 
Club of Greater Baltimore on March 
16th. 

Professor Harrison, a noted authority 
on Latin American history and politics, 
was to discuss our relations with Latin 
America. Harrison's talk should be ex- 
tremely helpful in providing the back- 
ground of current happenings in the 
Americas. 

The schedule of events for March 



16th called for a Buffet-Smorgasbord 
Supper to commence at 6:00 p.m. The 
entire second floor of the Student Union, 
621 W. Lombard St., had been reserved 
for the occasion. Professor Harrison's 
talk in the Health Sciences Library 
followed the dinner. 

The University's Board of Regents, 
the Deans of the Baltimore Schools, Dr. 
Elkins, President of the University, and 
Vice Presidents Drs. Kuhn and Horn- 
bake were guests of the local alumni 
club. All University of Maryland Alum- 
ni and friends were invited to attend. 




/ l \ 




Earl White, Carpentry Supervisor, demonstrates the lap board device he de- 
signed which is expected to save the University thousands of dollars annually. 



New Lap Board Demonstrated 

Earl D. White, Carpentry Supervisor, 
Department of the Physical Plant, has 
been recommended for a "Merit Award" 
through the Classified Employees Or- 
ganization of the State of Maryland for 
the development of a labor and money 
saving innovation. 

Transporting chairs for large student 
examinations from storage and class- 
rooms to the main floor of the Cole 
Student Activities Building and return- 
ing them after use, costs approximately 
$0.25 per chair in labor alone, exclusive 
of some breakage. Total capacity on 
main floor properly spaced for simul- 
taneous testing was 900 seats. This is 
now increased to 4,000. Large set ups 
for University examinations and College 
Entrance Testing now being handled 
would have required 8,000 chair place- 
ments alone in the 1961-62 school year 
or $2,000 a minimum of expenses. Total 
cost of 2,000 lap boards already built 
is $3,500, which will be more than 
repaid by next year with subsequent 



savings accruing to the University for 
as many years as they are used. 

Boards are sturdily constructed of 
pressed wood (masonite type) material 
with heavy hinges to insure stability. 
The entire 2,000 units were cut and 
assembled by regular University main- 
tenance carpenters, who developed a 
mass production system to complete the 
job in 1 1 man days. 



PG Alumni to Meet 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, University of Mary- 
land Executive Vice President, will ad- 
dress members of the Prince Georges 
County Alumni Club on April 13, at 
8 p.m. at the Student Union. 

Members of the University faculty 
have received an invitation from Prince 
Georges County President Dr. Jack 
Cronin and more than 150 are expected 
to attend. 



Some Recent Grants 
to the University 

For an Index Catalog to Russian, 
Central and Eastern European and 
Chinese Literature in Medical En- 
tomology. 

U.S. ARMY TO DEPARTMENT OF 
ZOOLOGY. 

$29,167. 

For forgivable loans to doctoral 
students in engineering. 

FORD FOUNDATION TO BOARD OF 

REGENTS. 

$50,000. 

For studies in rapid cosmic ray 
variations and interplanetary phys- 
ics. 

U.S. AIR FORCE TO DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS. 

$43,846. 

For cosmic ray monitoring at 
Hallett Station, Antarctica. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS. 
$18,000. 

For research involving mechanisms 
of inorganic reactions. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

$22,400. 

Toward the understanding of mag- 
netic Shockwaves and related prob- 
lems. 

U.S. AIR FORCE TO DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS. 

$94,000. 

For research on polyphenyls. 

U.S. AIR FORCE TO DEPARTMENT OF 
CHEMISTRY. 

$33,650. 

For research participation for Col- 
lege Teachers program. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS. 

$22,590. 

For renovation and expansion of 
research laboratories in microbi- 
ology. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY. 

$81,600. 

For research in fundamental inter- 
actions in the solid state. 

U.S. AIR FORCE TO DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS. 

$235,175. 

For research in materials science 
stressing the solid state. 

ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS 
' AGENCY TO THE DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS. 

$912,000. 
( ontinued on page 10 



the Maryland Magazine 




Dr. Truitt Leads Alumni Reappraisal 



DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, PRESIDENT OF THE 
Alumni Association, has been looking with a 
hard eye at alumni, their organizations and 
objectives. 

Dr. Truitt, a Maryland gentleman with a disciplined 
intellect and a far-ranging curiosity, believes "the Asso- 
ciation is in a state of ferment and I am ambitious to 
determine, in my administration, just where we are and 
where we are going. 

"We have initiated a program of study to find the 
answers to these questions. Some of the things we are 
studying have been suggested by questions which came to 
me prior to my taking office and others since then. 

"We have established seven committees and all of these 
are now at work. We have a committee studying ways 
in which to be of help to The Maryland Magazine. Al- 
though alumni recognize that The Maryland Magazine is 
one of the highest quality alumni magazines in the Nation, 
the Committee is hopeful of including more items of alumni 
interest in this publication. We endorse, however, the con- 
tinuing alumni education theme and the quality of the 
magazine. 

"Then we are studying the question of alumni member- 
ship in the Board of Regents, a question previously 
attacked but with an outcome deemed by some not entirely 
adequate. Here, an objective look will be had. 

"On another subject, we alumni are interested in the 
active pursuit of excellence, especially in regard to the 
superior student. We are anxious to demonstrate to the 
administration our concern and our support for programs 
which will encourage the gifted and motivated student to 
'stretch' to his maximum ability. 

"We are concerned with solicitation, that is, fund-raising, 
at the University. To become effective supporters of the 
Fund, we need to know more about its organization, 



operation and successes to date, and an appraisal of its 
future. 

"The fifth committee is engaged in studying the question 
of the expansion of the University, especially as it relates 
to the establishment of centers around the State. Per- 
sonally, I am highly interested in this subject. Alumni in 
general recognize the need for expanded facilities in higher 
education. The problem seems to be that of creating out- 
right new centers according to population densities or the 
acquisition of three of the State's Wva teachers colleges. 
In any event, the University must meet the challenge of 
population increases and informed alumni can help to 
that end. 

"Then we come to the committee which is asking ques- 
tions about the Association and the Council — what is the 
Association doing, what are its objectives, is the Council 
machinery such that it can do its job effectively? We feel 
that the structure and function of the Council should be 
evaluated and goals established. We are asking the ques- 
tion: 'Should the Council participate in consultations con- 
cerning University fund-raising activities among alumni? 1 

"The last committee 1 shall mention is working on the 
problem of alumni clubs. We feel that some of these are 
weak and we are wondering if we must baby them. Is this 
the right approach'' How valuable is the club system? We 
want to know. 

"I have one more observation concerning alumni. 1 feel 
that alumni should have the opportunity of attending 
classes of instruction with or without credit and. in other 
ways, enlarging upon their University education. I am 
strongly in favor of the continuing education theme. We 
should continually find ways in which alumni can make 
for themselves a better life. Should we go hack to the old 
Institute idea, the Chautauqua principle, or, perhaps, to 
straight educational work in localized classes by way of 
television." 



March- April, 1962 




A MARYLAND PIONEER 

not content to allow the times to go unchanged 



A MARYLAND PIONEER RECEIVED OVERDUE RECOGNI- 
tion when a room in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics was dedicated in her honor. Elizabeth H. 
Patterson was recognized by the Alumni Association 
of the College for her pioneering in the field of home eco- 
nomics. 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, Past President of the Alumni As- 
sociation for the College, was instrumental in bringing this 
honor to Mrs. Patterson. During her graduate years at the 
University, Mrs. Chapman wrote a history of home eco- 
nomics in Maryland as part of her master's program. 

"We were very fortunate to have a Mrs. Patterson in Mary- 
land. And certainly her pioneering work stood up well com- 



pared to the trials and tribulations in other areas. Year before 
last, during the 50th Anniversary of Home Economics, I was 
serving as President of the Home Economics Alumni Associa- 
tion. So it seemed to me that our organization could do some- 
thing to recognize Mrs. Patterson. We decided to have a plaque 
erected in honor of Mrs. Patterson in the College of Home 
Economics." 

In further recognition Mrs. Chapman presented a copy of 
her thesis to the Maryland Home Economics Association for 
its archives, dedicating the volume to Miss Marie Mount, 
former Dean, and to Mrs. Patterson. Of Mrs. Patterson she 
said, "I should like to honor Elizabeth H. Patterson, the 
Ellen H. Richards [founder of home economics] of Maryland. 



the Maryland Magazine 



Without the vision, purpose, and drive of (his unman, the 
history of home economics on both a state and national level 
might have developed in a much slower and less effective 
way. It is my feeling that adequate recognition ol Mis. 
Patterson's work has not been made. And I hope that in some 
small way, this copy will serve as a recognition of her pioneer- 
ing in home economics." 

Mrs. Patterson was the wife of Dr. H. J. Patterson, 
former president of the Maryland Agricultural College, and 
later dean of the College of Agriculture. She was vitally aware 
of the many problems that beset farm homes. She realized 
that the lot of farm women was very difficult. They lived a 
lonely, arduous life. Although a great amount of attention 
was placed on the adequate and nutritional feeding of farm 
animals, little or no attention was given to the proper feeding 
of the farm family. From the awareness of what science could 
do for the farm operation grew an intense desire to see science 
related to the farm home. Thus the early beginnings of home 
economics were closely related to the efforts to solve their 
problems. And Elizabeth Patterson's efforts and talent of 
persuasion brought about extension work for the benefit of 
the home, principally through the medium of the Farmer's 
Institutes. 

"There were some early farmers' clubs," Mrs. Chapman 
says, "I think one of the earliest was in Sandy Springs. 
There was another that developed in Prince Georges County. 
These were local organizations. But they were most effective 
in bringing to farmers the newer concepts of improved agri- 
culture. And finally it was decided that as this was worth- 
while in restricted areas, it might be taken on on a larger 
scale. So farmers institutes had their beginning. Farmers 
came to the Maryland Agriculture College to meetings. 
Later, a railroad car was equipped and outfitted as a lecture 
room. The specialists dealing with various phases of agri- 
culture lectured on this train. It had a very specific route that 
it followed through Maryland. And people attended lectures 
on the train and thereby gained newer knowledge and concepts 
of agriculture. It was really a traveling classroom." 

Elizabeth Patterson was not satisfied to settle for the 
progress being made at the College. 



A ROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR MARYLAND FARM WOMEN 

to learn of the newer concepts of homemaking was not 
enough. Often the entire family had to be educated into ac- 
cepting this help. A letter written early in this century illus- 
trates the prejudices of many concerning the participation of 
women in institute work. The letter states that, "only a few 
ladies attended meetings last winter. They are very particular. 



Ed. Note: In October, Mrs. Chapman was appointed Super- 
vising Director of Home Economics for the District of Columbia 
Public School System. She had been serving as Assistant Principal 
of Roosevelt High School. In her new post Mrs. Chapman con- 
tinues the tradition of Maryland home economics pioneering by 
insisting upon the application of the sciences for the education 
of the modern homemaker. She and her husband reside in a 
200-year-old house at Gambrills. 



especially in Southern Maryland, n> do thai which is populai 
I hey have been taught to expect entertainment instead ol 

instruction. Main wish they could gel nil the i. inn and into 
some social center .1 lesuli ol changed conditions since the 
War when all the work was done by slaves 01 would be il 
the host could afford it. In those tunes, it was not necessary 
that a lady know anything but how to entertain and be enter- 
tained. I his life begot an indifference on the p. hi ot the 
women as to the method ol labor. Which I am sorr\ to say 
can be noticed too often south ol the Mason-Dixon I ine. I he 

men being their mother's sons are in doubl whether or nol 
their wives and daughters should attend tanner's meetings'' 
Throughout those early years of the Twentieth Century, 
Elizabeth Patterson worked hard educating her farm neigh- 
bors, state and national legislators, and school officials. 
Finally the public school systems began (o teach a lew courses 
in vocational home economics. 

"As home economics grew in the public schools and in the 
extension service, it found acceptance on college campuses. 
In 1907, Hood College: the Maryland College tor Women 
in 1909; the Towson State College and the Princess Anne 
Academy for Negroes in 1909; in 1911, lohns Hopkins: in 
1914 the University of Maryland; and in 1917 Goucher Col- 
lege began teaching courses in home economics. 

"The typical courses offered at that time were: The Prac- 
tical Value of Domestic Science and Art, Essentials of a 
Sanitary Home, Home Atmosphere, Food Production, Food 
Consumption, Care of the Home, Textile Manufacture, Sew- 
ing, Chemistry and Bacteriology. I think there is one very 
interesting thing ... as home economics developed, the 
sciences associated with certain phases of home economics 
developed simultaneously. 

"In 1911 Mrs. Patterson served as a Chairman of a com- 
mittee on home economics of the National Grange. She 
represented that body at the hearings of the Page Bill for 
vocational training before the Agriculture Committee, House 
of Representatives. Her statement to the committee dealt 
with the part of the bill on Home Economics. In speaking 
of the error usually made by many that home economics 
meant only cooking and sewing, she said, 'It includes every 
science that will go towards making better homes for us." Many 
of the bills that followed this original bill were grounded on 
the efforts of Mrs Patterson's reasoning. I would say that she 
deserves much credit for her foresight in the development of 
home economics legislation." 

Commenting on the vocational character of much of this 
legislation, Mrs. Chapman said, "The early concepts of voca- 
tional agriculture were that 'one learns by doing.' I know 
that in my own life, I grew up in 4-H Work. And a project 
was very strongly emphasized ... it is even today. A per- 
son undertook a project and in doing it learned all of the 
scientific as well as the practical aspects of that project. 
So that was the basis . . . learning by doing was applied to 
a rural setting." 

As a thinking woman. Elizabeth Patterson had not been 
content to allow the times to go unchanged. She is honored 
today for her early recognition and belief that men and 
women should be educated for home and family lite . . . 
and for her untiring effort to see that dream materialize. 



March-April, J 962 







Tennis 


March 


29 
31 


Lafayette — Home. 
Syracuse — Home. 


April 


7 


Virginia — There. 




9 


N.C. State — There. 




13 


North Carolina — 
Home. 




14 


Wake Forest — Home. 




25 


Penn State — There. 




26 

28 


Hopkins — Home. 
Navy — There. 


May 


1 
4 


Georgetown — Home. 
Clemson — There. 




5 


South Carolina — 
There. 




7 


Duke — There. 


K 


1-12 


ACC tournament — 
Raleigh. N.C. 



SPRING 

SPORTS 

SCHEDULE 





Lacrosse 


March 


17 


Mt. Washington — 
Exhibition game there 
at 2:30 p.m. 




24 


Australian Team — 
Home at 2:30. 




27 


M.I.T.— Home at 2:30. 




31 


Princeton — 
Home at 2:30. 


April 


5 


Harvard — 
Home at 2:30. 




6 


New Hampshire — 
Home at 2:30. 




7 


Virginia — There. 




21 


Baltimore Club — 
Exhibition at College 
Park at 3:00. 




25 


Penn State — 
There at 3:30. 




28 


Navy — Home at 2:30. 


May 


5 
7 


Army — There. 

Duke — Home at 2:30. 




12 


Maryland Club — 
Exhibition at home at 
12:00 Noon. 




19 


Johns Hopkins — 
at Hopkins. 



Baseball 


March 




27 


Dartmouth — 




at College Park. 


28 


Layfayette — 




at College Park. 


30 


Syracuse — 




at College Park. 


April 




2 


Harvard — 




at College Park. 


6 


South Carolina — 




at Columbia, S.C. 


7 


Clemson — 




at Clemson, S.C. 


12 


Georgetown — 




at College Park. 


13 


South Carolina — 




at College Park. 


14 


Clemson — 




at College Park. 


17 


Navy — at Annapolis. 


20 


North Carolina — 




at Chapel Hill. 


21 


N.C. State— 




at Raleigh. 


27 


Duke- — at Durham. 


28 


Wake Forest — 




at Winston-Salem. 


May 




1 


Penn State — 




at University Park 




(3:30). 


4 


North Carolina — 




at College Park. 


5 


North Carolina State — 




at College Park. 


8 


Virginia — 




at College Park. 


9 


Georgetown — 




at Georgetown. 


1 1 


Duke— 




at College Park. 


12 


Wake Forest — 




at College Park. 


16 


Virginia — 




at Charlottesville. 







Golf 


March 








26 


M.I.T. — Home 
at 2:00 p.m. 


April 








2 


Clemson — at Clemson. 




3 


South Carolina — 
at S.C. 




13 


Virginia & Wake 
Forest — at Virginia. 




17 


Georgetown — 
at Georgetown. 




19 


North Carolina — 
at N.C. 




20 


Duke — at Durham. 




28 


Navy — at Navy 


May 








1 


Hopkins — at Hopkins. 




7 


North Carolina State — 
at College Park. 




8 


Penn State — 
at Penn State. 


ACC tournament May 1 1-12 at Winston- 


Salem. 






NCAA 


tournament June 18-23 at 


Durham 


, N.C. 



Outdoor Track 


March 

April 


30-31 

7 


Florida Relays. 

Pittsburgh — 
at College Park, 
1:30. 




13-14 
14 


Quantico Relays. 

Duke— 

at College Park, 

1:30. 




19 

27-28 


North Carolina — 
at Chapel Hill. 
Penn Relays. 


May 


5 


Navy — 

at College Park, 

1:30. 




11-12 


ACC Meet— 

at Columbia. South 

Carolina. 




19 
25-26 


DCAAU— 

at College Park. 
IC4A Meet— 
in New York. 


June 


15-16 


NCAA— 

at University of 
Oregon. 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 



An Album of Maryland Athletes 



jerry Greenspan . . . leading Terp 
rebounder and outstanding scorer . . . 
Junior. 





bruci ki i i i in i< . . . leading Terp 
playmaker and good scorer for three 
years . . . Senior . . . I I' I All ( mi 
I ere me team 1962. 



john belitza . . . greatest Terp pole 
vaulter of all time . . . the only man 
south of Villanova to top 15 feet 
while competing in college . . . only 
a Junior . . . has topped J 5 feet four 
times in competition this year . . . best 
15' 3 3 A" at Navy for a Maryland and 
Navy Field House record . . . cur- 
rently setting records almost every 
time he vaults on a collegiate basis. 



MARYLAND WRESTLING CO-Captains 

Seniors . . . Eugene Kerin, 157 pounds 
. . . Pat Varre, 147 pounds 
. . . leading Terp grapplers. 




I EADING TERP SWIMMER . . 

squad . . .Hui>h Roddin . . 
. ACC 1.500-vard freestyle 



. Most versatile on 
. Junior co-captain 
champion in IV6I . 



Alumni Notes 

Continued from page 4 




Dr. Storey, left, talks with usia chief Edward R. Marrow 



Professor of Medicine to 
Direct Moscow Exhibit 

Dr. Patrick D. Storey, Chairman and 
Director of the Post Graduate Com- 
mittee of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, has been selected 



as Medical Director for "Medicine- 
U.S.A.", one of the cultural exchange 
exhibits under auspices of the United 
States Information Agency. The exhibit 
is scheduled for showing in such cities 
as Moscow, Kiev, and Leningrad this 
spring. 

Dr. Storey is a graduate of George- 
town University School of Medicine. 
He received his training in pulmonary 
diseases and internal medicine at D. C. 
General Hospital, where he spent the 
first six years of his professional career. 

After military service at the Fitz- 
simons Army Hospital, where he was 
chief of the enlisted men's section and 
in charge of the clinical research pro- 
gram of the tuberculosis service, he was 
in 1955 appointed staff physician of the 
Baltimore Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital. The next year he became chief of 
medical service and in 1958 was ap- 
pointed to his present position as direc- 
tor of professional services. 



Fund Ahead of 1961 

On March 15th, a week ahead of the An- 
nual General Canvass of the Greater 
University of Maryland Fund, contribu- 
tions were running 20% ahead of '61, it 
was announced by Howard Filbert, Na- 
tional Canvass Chairman, and Dr. Albert 
E. Goldstein, Chairman. All the local 
chairmen have been appointed and ap- 
proximately 450 Alumni Sponsors had 
signed up to serve on local alumni 
Sponsors Committees. 



ALUMNI ARE INVITED TO 

SEND PERSONAL NEWS TO 

THEIR CORRESPONDENT OR 

TO THE EDITOR 



Ambassador to Address Far 
East Commencement 

Dr. Edwin O. Reischauer, U.S. Am- 
bassador to Japan, will be the principal 
speaker at the fifth annual formal com- 
mencement ceremonies of the Univer- 
sity's Far East Division in Tokyo on 
March 25. 

Approximately 60 military and civil- 
ian students who completed degree re- 
quirements while stationed in the Far 
East will receive their degrees in formal 
cap and gown ceremonies in the Kudan 
Kaikan auditorium in downtown Tokyo. 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, University Ex- 
ecutive Vice President, will fly to Tokyo 
to confer the degrees. University Col- 
lege Dean Ray Ehrensberger will pre- 
side along with Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard, 
Director of the Far East Division. 

High ranking U.S. military and Jap- 
anese government officials will attend 
the event, the highlight of the academic 
year in the Far East Division. 

Ambassador Reischauer was born in 
Tokyo and spent many years there. He 
speaks fluent Japanese and his wife is 
Japanese. 



Cloverland 

Jarms 

Dairy 

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Home 

"Delivery 

Service 

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► Visit Cloverland's Golden Guernsey Farm — Dulaney Valley A 
Road — 8 miles north of Towson. Milking starts at 4 P.M. ^ 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland Books and Authors 

by Mrs. Harold Hayes, 
Head, Mar viand Room, McKcldin Library 



Christmas 

JR££S 

^AND HOW THBYGROW 




GLBNHO. BLOUGH 



PKTURes byJEAHNB BEHDICk 
I 







LOOKOUT 

FOR THE 

FOREST 



A Conwmt*yn> <X 




Hi 







CHRISTMAS TREES AND HOW 
THEY GROW by Glenn (). 
Blough; illustrated by Jeanne lien- 
dick. New York: Whittlesey House 
Books for Young People. 1961. 
$2.75. 

CHRISTMAS TREES AND HOW I III Y 
grow is the most recent of 33 
books written for teachers and chil- 
dren by Dr. Glenn O. Blough, Pro- 
fessor of Education. 

Six of his books for children have 
been chosen for distribution by the 
Junior Literary Guild Book Club. 
Several have been translated into a 
dozen languages and some are being 
transferred into Braille. 

The reviews of Christmas Trees 
and How They Grow following indi- 
cate the kind of reception given to 
books written by Dr. Blough and il- 
lustrated by Jeanne Bcndick. 

"Amplifying Miss Alcott's famous 
opening, Christmas wouldn't be 
Christmas to an American child with- 
out presents under a sparkling, odor- 
ous green tree. Yet the city child 
who gets his tree from the sidewalk 
market rarely has any idea of the 
processes by which it has come into 
being. Glenn Blough in his usual 
easy way of dealing with scientific 
facts presents here the natural history 
of Christmas trees (as well as their 
companions who end up as books, 
houses, or telephone poles), slips in 
some healthy hints about conservation 
and tells, also, how to keep the festive 
tree green longer through the winter 
and how to use it as a source of 
supplies for hungry winter birds, thus 
prolonging our initial pleasure. ' The 
New York Times. 

"This is an excellent book of far 
greater scope than its title indicates. 
Mr. Blough has taken advantage of 
a child's natural interest in Christmas 
trees to make of this handsomely- 
illustrated book a lively and absorb- 
ing account for tree growth and 
anatomy, of conservation practices, 
of the value of woodlands, of the dis- 
tinction between different evergreens 
and other trees and many other topics. 
For youngsters from six to ten, this 




WHO LIVES 

Iff THIS 

HOUSE? 

Jp A Stout ^ Animal fwni&ed. 
GLENH 0.B10UGH 



*$ 



~Tj 



AG 

ncrVi 



<K£i tr JfAMMi BtNPlCH 




^«^ 



ACLENN O BLOUGH 

p&vufyJEANNE BEHDICK 



4 * 




ij^jcmonthe 
roadJvlturntown 




, GLENN 0. BLOUGH 

■{ JEANNE BEN DKK 



March-April, 1962 



11 



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wants to assure the 
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his loved ones. Our 
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be pleased to discuss 
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and your attorney at 
no cost or obligation. 

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Maryland 
Books 
and 
Authors 

Continued from page II 



is a very superior book and, of course, 
an ideal birthday or Christmas gift." 
The Standard Times (New Bedford, 
Mass). 

"A delightful nature book which 
describes the life cycles of the kinds 
of evergreens that are commonly used 
as Christmas trees. It should make 
a fine gift for young naturalists during 
the fall and holiday seasons." Pub- 
lishers' Weekly. 



who uvea * 

IN THIS J 
MEADOW? s* 

4* UENNO.BLOUQH 

PICTURES BY OSANNE SENDlOK 




Among Dr. Blough's books are 
Primary Unitexts; Elementary School 
Science and How to Teach It; Mon- 
key with a Notion; Be no the Mayor; 
The Tree on the Road to Turntown; 
Not Only for Ducks; Lookout for the 
Forest; Who Lives in the Meadow? 
Who Lives in this House, also illus- 
trated by Jeanne Bendick. 



& 



'Washington's Best Restaurant" 

-luliila\ Muguzine (*th CcnscciuiM.- Year) 

One of America's Ten Best" 

Suliotul Poll 

OCCIDENTAL 



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Between the Woihinglon & Willotd Holrli 

Open Doily A Sunday 11:30 AM. -1:00 A.M. 
Telephone 01. 7-6467 



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-fully Appointed Rl 



nq To Parties. M« 

Evtflbliihed For 



lodatmq 10 To 250 P* 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



Horn Book says of Who Lives in 
this House? "At first glance, the ram- 
shackle house on Highway 12 seems 
vacant, but there are actually six 
families living in it! One by one we 
meet them — robins, wasps, squirrels, 
bees, skunks and spiders — and learn 
how they live. An interesting, easy 
nature book for younger readers." 

In 1960, Dr. Blough's book. Dis- 
covering Dinosaurs, illustrated by 
Gustav Schrotter was published. The 
Standard Times in New Bedford, 
Mass., has this to say: "The 7-1 1 set 
will like this well-illustrated and well- 
narrated story of the giant reptiles 
that roamed the earth so many mil- 
lions of years ago. Dr. Blough does 
more than describe the giant beasts, 
he goes on to recount the scientific 
detective work that has made the 
reconstruction of the great beast pos- 
sible today." 



WAIT FOR THE 

SUNSHINE 

The Stcftty. of Sw&an&j 
wndj Gimvna. TJum.q&> 

3+GLENN O. BLOUGH 




College of 
AGRICULTURE 



Although Dr. Blough has had rec- 
ognition from many sources he says 
one award given him is highly prized: 
the Diamond Award presented to him 
by the students of the University of 
Maryland in 1958. The award is 
given for the outstanding faculty 
member for achievement in his own 
field, service to students, to the Uni- 
versity and to the community. 

When, in 1950, he was awarded 
an Honorary Doctor's degree from 
Central Michigan College of Edu- 
cation for distinguished contribution 
in the field of education, the citation 
read: "A creative thinker, an inno- 
vator, a skilled writer, a master 
teacher, Glenn O. Blough has proved 
himself eminently qualified to be hon- 
ored by his Alma Mater." 

Teachers and children using and 
reading his books the world over agree 
with this citation. 

— Mrs. Harold Hayes 



A. li. Hamilton 



Reaching Around mi World 

The University o( Maryland College ol 
Agriculture has completed a contract 

with the Agency lor International De- 
velopment (AID) to train lx Extension 
Service Supervisors from the countries 
of Bolivia, Iraq, Thailand, Philippines, 
Vietnam, Korea. Indonesia and the 
Republic of China. 

Alter five months of attending classes. 
living with farm families and traveling 
with Maryland Extension Agents the 
people have returned to their home 
countries to help their people. 



Ckandall to Sudan 

Bowcn S. Crandall, '32, has transferred 
his base of activities from Guatemala 
City to the Sudan where he is Plant 
Pathology Advisor to the Ministry of 
Agriculture. 



Sohn to Washington State 

Captain Henry A. Sohn, '48, has com- 
pleted the U. S. Air Force technical 
training course for missile guidance con- 
trol officers at Sheppard AFB, Texas. 
Capt. Sohn learned radio inertial guid- 
ance of the Titan missile and is sta- 
tioned at Larson AFB, Washington. 
The Captain and his wife, the former 
Hazel Davis, have four children. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



General Luckey Succeeds 
General Burger 

Maj. Gen. Robert B. Luckey, '27, was 
nominated for promotion to the tem- 
porary rank of Lieutenant General by 
President Kennedy. He was also named 
Commanding General. Fleet Marine 
Force, Atlantic, with headquarters in 
Norfolk, Virginia. He succeeded Lt. 
Gen. Joseph C. Burger. '25. who retired 
November, 1961. 

Gen. Luckey completed 40 years of 
service when he pinned on his third 
star as a Marine officer. 

{Continued on next page) 



h 



i 



l.l I 




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OPPORTUNITIES 

WITH 

Westinghouse 

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COMPANY" 



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molecular electronics, bionics, 
optical physics, Pulse Doppler 
radar, MASER and LASER, ad- 
vanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. You'll 
have at your disposal the finest 
company owned facilities, and 
you'll be associated with some of 
the nation's outstanding engineers 
and scientists. You'll be encour- 
aged to combine project work 
with pursuit of advanced degrees 
at Johns Hopkins University, the 
University of Maryland or 
George Washington University 
under our Continued Education 
Program. Your career will thrive 
at Westinghouse . . . "the engi- 
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Call: 

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BALTIMORE 

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Baltimore 3, Md. 

Air Arm Ordnance 

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March- April, 1962 



13 




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MO. 



He was born in Hyattsville, Maryland, | 
and is married to the former Cary 
Walker of Vineyard Haven, Massachu- 
setts. They have three children. 



Summer Language Institute in 1962 

The University's second Summer Lan- 
guage Institute will be conducted from 
June 25 through August 10 at College 
Park. The Institute, set up under the 
National Defense Education Act of 
1958 through the Language Develop- 
ment section of the U.S. Office of Edu- 
cation, will be directed by Dr. Philip 
Rovner of the Department of Foreign 
Languages. 

Designed for secondary school teach- 
ers of French and Spanish, the In- 
stitute aims to improve their speaking 
fluency, perfect their classroom meth- 
ods in accordance with modern audio- 
lingual techniques, acquaint them with 
the latest electro-mechanical aids, and 
enrich their cultural backgrounds about 
French or Spanish-speaking civilizations. 

Sixty selected applicants, half in each 
language, will participate in a program 
of intensive study and language prac- 
tice supplemented by informal recrea- 
tion. A stipend of $75 a week, $15 per 
week for each dependent, is granted to 
every public school teacher chosen. 
Private school teachers are also eligible 
for the program, without the stipend. 
Applicants may receive seven credits 
for work at the Institute depending upon 
their previous scholastic record. 

Speaking the foreign language all 
summer is the rule. Participants live in 
campus dormitories, eat in the dining- 
hall and mingle with native "informants" 
in a foreign atmosphere specifically de- 
signed for their needs. 

Application forms and information 
may be obtained from Dr. Philip Rov- 
ner, NDEA Summer Language Insti- 
tute, Department of Foreign Languages, 
University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 



Sino-American Round Table 

A conference on "The Teaching of the 
Chinese Language and Culture" will be 
held at the College Park campus on 
May 8. It will be the eighth annual 
Round Table Conference on the pro- 
motion of Sino-American cultural rela- 
tions, conducted under the triple spon- 
sorship of the China Institute of Amer- 
ica, the American Association of 
Teachers of Chinese Language and Cul- 
ture, and the University of Maryland. 

Over fifty teachers and scholars from 
the continental United States and Ha- 
waii, along with representatives from 
the Chinese Embassy will attend the 
Conference, chaired by Dean Leon P. 
Smith and Professor Douglas W. Alden, 
Head of the Foreign Languages Depart- 
ment. On the planning committee are 



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14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland's Dean Richard H. Stottlcr, 
Director of Institutes, University Col- 
lege, Dean Furman A. Bridgers, Advisor 
to Foreign Students, and Mr. ('. C. 
Chen, Instructor of Chinese in the 
Foreign Languages Department. 

Literary Lecturer from 
the Argentine 

Professor Jorge Luis Borges, who has 
been called the leading writer in the 
Spanish-speaking world today, honored 
the University of Maryland with a visit 
on February 21, Invited by Dr. Graciela 
Nemes and accompanied by Senor Juan 
J. Mathe, first secretary of the Argen- 
tine Embassy, Senor Borges came to the 
McKeldin Library Auditorium for an 
informal question and answer session 
in Spanish on world literature in general 
and the poetry of North and South 
America in particular. He stayed for 
another hour in a smaller room for peo- 
ple who wanted to continue the discus- 
sion. Later he praised the seriousness 
and knowledge of the students, as well 
as the graciousness of students and 
faculty at Maryland. 

Co-winner with Samuel Beckett of 
the International Publishers' Prize for 
1961, Borges is Professor of American 
and English Literature at the University 
of Buenos Aires and Director of the 
National Library there. He is famous 
for his short stories and essays. 

At a luncheon tendered Borges in the 
President's Room of the dining hall, 
professors from neighboring universities 
joined with Maryland colleagues in pay- 
ing tribute to a great literary figure. 



Current Publications 

The Foreign Languages Department has 
been publishing from India to Mary- 
land. 

Dr. Graciela Nemes has written a 
chapter for Tagore: the Poet of Light, 
published in India in 1961 in Hindi, 
Bengali and English. The contributors 
include figures of note from all over 
the world, such as Albert Schweitzer 
and Pearl Buck. Mrs. Nemes, a former 
student of the Nobel prize-winning poet 
Jimenez, wrote on "Tagore and Jimenez, 
Poetic Coincidences." The volume's 
editor is Prafulla Chandra Das, of 
Cutack, Orissa. 

Mr. Andre Zinovieff of the Russian 
section of Maryland's Languages De- 
partment is co-author of a booklet en- 
titled Development and Evaluation of 
Training Methods for the Rapid Acqui- 
sition of Language Skills, published in 
January 1962 by the Training Methods 
Division of the George Washington 
University Human Resources Research 
Office, operating under contract from 
the Department of the Army. The book- 
let is Research Report 9, signed, with 
Mr. Zinovieff, by Eugene H. Rocklyn 
and Richard E. Moren. 



Dr. Marguerite Rand's article on 
"Azorin, in l l >6() and Alter' appeared 
in Hispania, March 1962. Under a 
grant-in-aid from the Graduate School's 
Genera] Research Board, Mrs Rand 
spent time in the summer ot I960 with 
Azorin, the dean ol Spanish letters, 
whom she kness from a former yeai 
that she spent in Spain u riling a book 
on him. 

Dr. Jean V. Alter's note on "Poten- 
tial FLES Teachers and their Training" 
appeared in the Modern Language 
Journal. January 1962, Dr. Leonora 

Cohen Rosenfield's review article on 
Lester Ci. Crocker's An Age of Crisis 
came out in the French Review, Januars 
1962. 

Dr. William R. Quynn contributed "A 
Neglected Early Document in the Que- 
telle des Anciens et des Modernes" to 
Romance Notes Vol. III. 1961. His 
"Jacob Engelbrecht: Collector of Auto- 
graph Letters (1797-1878)" appeared 
in the Maryland Historical Magazine, 
Vol. 56, Dec. 1961. 



Language Teaching Lecture 



Dr. Henry Mendeloff, of the College of 
Education and the Department of For- 
eign Languages, lectured at the Du Val 
High School in Lanham on March 
16. His talk on "An Introduction to 
Applied Linguistics Theory and Prac- 
tice" was delivered at the invitation 
of Mrs. Dora Kennedy, supervisor of 
Foreign Languages in Prince Georges 
County. 



I old H, N I \S(,I \(,| I Mini* \ lolO 

\ modern foreign language laborat 
installed .,( ., t ,,st ,.• o in the 

l Diversity's new language building, has 
been in constant daj time use this 
tor students oi elemental*) I rench I 
man. Italian. Kussi.ui and Spanish i 

the evenings, the lab h.is been .is ail.ihle 

for students oi the Methods course in 
the ( ollege oi i ducation, taughl 1 1 
Philip Rovner ol the Department <>i 

Foreign languages. Dr. Rosnei. I) 

tor oi the laboratory, has st.iteii 
"Teachers and prospective teachers ol 
foreign languages now have an oppor- 
tunity lor experimental ssork in lan- 
guage teaching based on laboratory tech 

niques. This should benefit elemental") 

and secondary schools throughout the 

state." 



(iokdon Awarded 1962 Dan forth 

Foundation I-'i-.i iowship 

Stewart L. Cordon, well-known pianist 
and an Instructor in the University of 
Maryland Department ol Music, has 
been awarded a 1962 Dantorth Foun- 
dation Fellowship lor graduate studs 
at the Eastman School. Rochester. 
New York. 

The Danforth study grant will enable 
Ciordon to complete his doctoral studs, 
which he began during the summers 
of 1958 and 1959. 

A native of Olathe Kansas. Gordon 
holds a B.A. and M.A. degree from the 
University of Kansas. Before coming 
to Maryland in I960, he was Chairman 

(Continued on next page) 



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of the Department of Music at Wilming- 
ton College in Ohio. 

Since 1959, he has performed numer- 
ous concerts on college campuses, at fes- 
tivals, on civic and community pro- 
grams, and with symphony orchestras 
across the country including the Na- 
tional Gallery of Art, El Paso Sym- 
phony Orchestra and Tobias Matthay 
Festival at Tamworth, New Hampshire. 
Between 1959 and 1960 he recorded 
the complete Rachmaninoff Preludes, 
a two-volume recording, and Schubert's 
Op. 143 and Op. 11. 



Personal Notes 

Capt. Robert E. Grutzik, '56 is being 
assigned to the United States Air Force's 
first all-jet strategic airlift unit, the 18th 
Air Transport Squadron, Tinker AFB, 
Oklahoma. He will serve as a navigator 
in the new C-135 "Stratojet" unit of 
the Military Air Transport Service. 

Theodore H. Erbe, '36, was presented 
a special award for the completion of 
1,000 weeks of continuous production. 
Mr. Erbe has produced at least one 
new Life, Accident or Health applica- 
tion every week during his entire busi- 
ness career. Mr. Erbe is a Chartered 
Life Underwriter and partner in the firm 
of T. H. Erbe Company, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Harrison S. Brink, Jr., '57, is a mem- 
ber of the 464th Transportation Com- 
pany, an Army Reserve unit, which was 
recently recalled to active duty and as- 
signed to the 3d Transportation Ter- 
minal Training Group at Fort Eustis, 
Virginia. 

Nicholas A. Zindler, M.A. '60, has 
been promoted to specialist four in 
Frankfurt, Germany. 

George T. Corrigan, '55, joined the 
Philadelphia advertising office of TV 
Guide magazine as a sales representa- 
tive. 

Louis Isaacson, '56 received his 
master of science degree in chemistry 
from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology this fall. 

Jesse E. Sherwood, MS '52, joined 
the staff of the Experimental Physics 
Department of the University of Cali- 
fornia Lawrence Radiation Laboratory 
in Livermore, California. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Prof. James H. Reid 

Personal Notes 

Robert A. Will, '50, has been named 
Manager of Plant Location Surveys for 
the Austin Company, engineers and 
builders, Cleveland, Ohio. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maj. Aames R. Smith, '50, is attend- 
ing the 16-week associate course at the 
Army Command and General Staff 
College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

1st Lt. James T. McKenzie, '56, has 
been named one of the outstanding 
students of his class at the United States 
Air Force Squadron Officer School at 
Tinker AFB, Oklahoma. The school pre- 
pares young officers for command and 
staff positions at squadron and wing 
levels. 

2nd Lt. Robert Wayne Mullican, '61. 
soloed for the first time in the T-37 jet 
trainer during primary (light training 
at Tinker AFB, Oklahoma. 

Harry M. Trebing, BPA '52. has been 
named Associate Professor in Trans- 
portation and Public Utilities in the 
School of Business at the University 
of Nebraska. He was an honor graduate 
of the University. 



Howard Krause Named 
Brokerage Consultant 

Howard Krause, '51, has been named a 
Brokerage Consultant at the Baltimore 
office of Connecticut General Life In- 
surance Company. Mr. Krause will work 
with independent general insurance men 
and their clients in all areas of business 
and personal insurance. 

He and his wife, the former Barbara 
Sherry of Baltimore, have three children. 

Dr. Donald W. O'Connell 
Appointed New Dean 

Dr. Donald W. O'Connell, Program 
Associate for the Economic Develop- 
ment Administration of The Ford 
Foundation, has been appointed Dean 
of the University College of Business 
and Public Administration. 

Professor James H. Reid has been 
acting dean of the college since the re- 
tirement of Dean J. Freeman Pyle in 
June of last year. 

Dr. O'Connell is a native of New 
York City, and received a B.A. degree 
in 1937, an M.A. degree in 1938, 
and a Ph.D. degree in 1953 from 
Columbia University. 

He was named a Kellett Fellow at 
Cambridge University in 1938. The 
award is made to the top graduate in 
economics at Columbia. 

Dr. O'Connell has had wide experi- 
ence as both teacher and an author. He 
has held numerous faculty positions at 
Columbia University. These included 
Instructor and Associate in Economics, 
Assistant Dean and Assistant Professor 
of Banking, and Associate Professor of 
Banking in the Graduate School of 
Business. He was also Associate Direc- 
tor of the Consumer Credit Manage- 
ment Program. 

He was an economic editorial writer 
for The New York Herald Tribune 
between 1949 and 1956. 

(Continued on next page) 



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March-April, 1962 



17 



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Dr. O'Connell is a member of Phi 
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The appointment was effective Feb- 
ruary 1, 1962. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A hall 



News of Alumni 

Julian A. Weingarten, who received his 
B.S. from the College of Education, 
University of Maryland, in 1960 was 
recently commissioned as a 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in the U. S. Marine Corps at 
Quantico, Virginia. Lt. Weingarten is 
enrolled in Basic School, Quantico, for 
a six-month orientation program. He 
qualified as expert with both the pistol 
and the M-14 rifle. 

Elmer F. Bright of Towson, Mary- 
land, class of 1947, is employed by 
Baltimore Public Schools as a teacher, 
and is attending the 16-week associate 
course at the Army Command and 
General Staff College, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, of the Army National 
Guard. This class, composed of 75 
Army Reserve and Army National 
Guard officers, is designed to prepare 
selected officers from all components 
of the Army for duty as commanders 
and general staff officers. 

Dr. Norma H. Compton completed 
requirements for her Ph.D. degree this 
year while serving as a graduate fellow 
in the Institute for Child Study. She will 
continue her association with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland as Associate Pro- 
fessor of Textiles and Clothing in the 
College of Home Economics. Dr. 
Compton formerly was an instructor at 
Montgomery Blair High School and 
served as a lecturer-instructor for the 
University of Maryland College of 
Home Economics from 1957 until 1960. 

Grant Received 

In January the University of Maryland 
received from the National Science 
Foundation two separate grants for work 
to be carried out under the University 
of Maryland Mathematics Project 
(UMMaP) which is a cooperative proj- 
ect of the College of Education and the 
Department of Mathematics. One of 
the grants is for a summer institute in 
mathematics for elementary teachers 
and supervisors for which stipends will 
be available for 36 teachers and super- 
visors. Professor Helen L. Garstens of 
the College of Education and the De- 
partment of Mathematics of the Uni- 



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the Maryland Magazine 



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versity and Dr. Charles W. Nelson >>t 
the Department ol Mathematics ol 
Purdue University will be teachers in 
the institute, rhe second grant provides 
for a three-year activity in which two 
mathematics texts for use bj elementary 
teachers will be written, tried out on an 
experimental basis and revised al the 
end ol each year ol tryout. Professors 

John R. Mayor and Helen I (..listens 
ol the College ol 1 ducation and the 
Department ol Mathematics ol the Uni- 
versity are Director and Associate Di- 
rector of UMMaP and ol the neu 
projects. Professor Stanley Jackson ol 
the Department of Mathematics is spe- 
cial consultant for the new course proj 
ect. 



FACULTY Activities and Awards 

Dr. Daniel Prescott, Professor and Di- 
rector Emeritus. Institute for Child 
Study, has been selected as a lecturer in 
Australia by the Hoard of Foreign 
Scholarships under the Fulbright Act. 
He will lecture on Child Study at 
Victoria Training College in Melbourne 
and will participate in a lecture tour to 
all the Australian States with other 
educators from England, India and the 
Philippines. Mrs. Prescott will accom- 
pany Dr. Prescott on this assignment. 

Dr. Orval Ulry. Professor of Edu- 
cation and Director of Summer School, 
served as discussion leader for Group 
2 of Area I at the AST program in 
Chicago using the topic "Selection of 
Students for Teacher Education." Dr. 
Ulry also served as Educational Con- 
sultant for the first book of the series 
of NSTA, Vistas of Science I: SPACE- 
CRAFT. 

Dr. James L. Hymes, Jr., Chairman 
of the Early Childhood Education De- 
partment, has been elected as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of Cre- 
ative Playthings, Inc., a firm engaged in 
the development and sale of equipment 
and laboratory lesson materials to the 
elementary school market and in the 
development of toys and learning aids 
for the home through learning centers. 

Mrs. Margaret Stant, Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Early Childhood Education, ad- 
dressed the Tidewater Association at 
Portsmouth, Virginia, on topic, "Essen- 
tials of Good Teaching." 

Dr. Henry Mendeloff, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Foreign Lan- 
guages, is serving as foreign language 
textbook test and curriculum consultant 
for the program of Affiliation at the 
Catholic University of America: as 
author of "On a Modern Foreign Lan- 
guage Program for the High School" 
in Teaching Foreign Languages in the 
Modern World, ed. Tatiana Fotitch. 
Catholic University of America Press, 
1961; and will be guest lecturer at the 
Prince George's County in-service train- 

(Continued on next page) 



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ing session for foreign language teachers 
for the topic, "An Introduction to 
Applied Linguistics: Theory and Prac- 
tice." 

Dr. L. Morris McClure, Assistant 
Dean of the College of Education, is 
serving as President of the Maryland 
Department of Supervision and Cur- 
riculum Development. 

Dr. Donald Maley, Professor and 
Head of Industrial Education, at the 
invitation of President Kennedy, will 
attend and participate in the President's 
Conference on Occupational Safety. 
This is the eighth biennial meeting of 
the conference initiated and established 
by President Truman in 1948 in which 
over 3,000 leaders of American indus- 
try, labor, agriculture, Federal, State 
and local Governments, insurance, edu- 
cation and science, health and private 
safety organizations from all parts of 
the country participated. 

AASA Meetings 

The following members of the Faculty 
attended the Annual Meeting of the 
American Association of School Ad- 
ministrators in Atlantic City: Dean 
Vernon E. Anderson, Professor Ken- 
neth Hovet, Professor M. Clemens 
Johnson, Professor Clarence Newell, 
Professor Alvin Schindler, Professor 
James E. van Zwoll and Professor 
Gladys S. Wiggin. 

Dean Anderson served as panel leader 
for the TV broadcast on "What's New 
in Curriculum." Dr. van Zwoll ad- 
dressed the convention on the topic, 
"The Domain of the School Adminis- 
trator in the Merit Rating of School 
Employees." Dr. Hovet served as a 
seminar participant in discussing how 
to further enhance man's knowledge of 
the physical world. Dr. Newell partici- 
pated in a case study presentation, "A 
University and a Local School System 
Work Together to Study and Prepare 
School Principals and Supervisors." 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 



Dean Selma Lippeatt 



New Faculty Appointments 

Two new faculty appointments in the 
College of Home Economics on Feb- 
ruary 1 are: 

Dr. Norma H. Compton, Associate 
Professor of Textiles and Clothing. Her 
responsibilities include a new emphasis 
on the psychological-sociological aspect 
of the field. 

Dr. Virginia Britton, formerly of 
Pennsylvania State University, became 
a faculty member of the Department of 
Family Life and Management. She will 
direct undergraduate and graduate work 
in family economics. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



New Research Projects 

Three new research projects have been 
initiated in the college: 

1. A study of the effectiveness ol 
bleaching agents in relation to home 
laundering. This controlled experimental 
study is a joint project of the Depart- 
ment of Textiles and Clothing and 
Family Life and Management. It is 
being conducted by Mrs. Eleanor Young 
and supported by a grant-in-aid of Olin 
Mathieson Chemical Corporation. 

2. The second in a series of studies 
on micro-wave cooking is underway. 
The nutritive content of vegetables pre- 
pared by this method of cooking is being 
determined. New equipment has been 
installed in the experimental foods lab- 
oratory. The study is being directed by 
Mrs. Mary S. Eheart. 

3. A study in recipe development for 
low phenylalanine content is being con- 
ducted by graduate students under the 
direction of Mary Eheart. There is a 
need for this laboratory experimenta- 
tion in the treatment of patients suffer- 
ing from Phenylketonuria — a disease 
primarily of infants and young children 
associated with mental retardation. 

Non-Credit Offering 

A Gourmet Food Institute sponsored 
cooperatively by the College of Home 
Economics and University College is 
being held from February 17 to May 
12. This is a non-credit offering pro- 
vided to meet public demand. 

Prof. Mitchell on Leave 

T. Faye Mitchell, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Textiles and Clothing, is on 
sabbatical leave for the second semester. 
She's traveling in the Far and Middle 
East with study emphasis centered on 
cultural and historical influences on 
textiles and fashions. 

Special Events Scheduled 

Special events in the College of Home 
Economics scheduled for the spring in- 
clude: On March 31, the State Con- 
vention of Future Homemakers of 
America; April 7, the State Convention 
of the American Dietetic Association; 
April 16-20 and 24-27, Hospitality 
Weeks, at which time high school 
seniors, prospective students, parents, 
and teachers are invited to the College 
by appointment. 



School of 
LAW 



Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich 



Personal Notes 

Airman 3rd Class Herbert Levenstein, 
LLB, '61, has been named honor grad- 
uate of the United States Air Force 
(Continued on next page) 



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March-April, 1962 



21 



McLeod & Romborg 

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JOHNSTON, LEMON & CO. 

Member Philadelphia-Baltimore Sfock Exchange 



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STerling 3-3130 



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frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

Te Hotels. 

Institutions, Ships, 

Clubs. Etc. 



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Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 



BALTIMORE. MD. 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



Supply Specialists Course at Amarillo 
AFB, Texas. He attained a 93 average 
to win the honor, and is assigned to 
Andrews AFB, Maryland, for duty. 

Edgar H. Farrell, Jr., LLB, '50, of 
Time's advertising sales staff has been 
appointed as Automotive Supervisor. He 
will operate out of Detroit. 



School of 

MEDICINE 

Dr. John Wagner 



Class Notes 

Josephine Renshaw, '43, has been elect- 
ed second Vice President of the Med- 
ical Society of the District of Columbia. 
Dr. Renshaw recently presided at a ses- 
sion on Tranquilizers and Antidepres- 
sants on the occasion of the 29th An- 
nual Scientific Assembly of the Medical 
Society of the District of Columbia, 
November 28, 1961. 

Harry E. Walkup, '43, Assistant Direc- 
tor of the Surgical Service, U. S. Vet- 
erans Administration Hospital, Wash- 
ington, D. C, has been appointed Direc- 
tor of Research of the American Thor- 
acic Society-National Tuberculosis As- 
sociation. Dr. Walkup assumed his new 
position September 1, 1961. 

The new appointment will involve de- 
velopment of policy and responsibility 
for the administration of the Society's 
research program and for maintaining 
contact with and giving consultation to 
constituent and affiliated associations 
concerned with thoracic research. 

Prior to his appointment at the Vet- 
erans Administration central office in 
February, 1961, Dr. Walkup was Chief 
of the Surgical Services and Assistant 
Director for Professional Services in 
charge of research at the Veterans Hos- 
pital in Oteen, N. C. 

Donald W. Mintzer, '44, has an- 
nounced the removal of his office from 
1922 East Belvedere Avenue in Balti- 
more to 3009 Evergreen Ave. in Balti- 
more, Md. 

Stanley R. Steinbach, '45, has an- 
nounced the opening of his office for 
the practice of internal medicine at The 
Eleven Slade Apartments, 1 1 Slade 
Ave., Baltimore 8, Md. 

J. Howard Latimer, '45, Salt Lake City 
17, Utah, writes: "Have been associated 
with the VA doing Internal Medicine 
and Psychiatry. Have been recalled to 
active military duty with Utah National 
Guard." He will be temporarily sta- 
tioned at Ft. Lewis, Washington. 

Aaron Feder, '38, has been promoted 
to full Visiting Physician on the Second 
(Cornell) Medical Division, Cornell 
Medical School. Dr. Feder also has been 
appointed to membership on the Mid- 
ical Board of Bellevue Hospital. For 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



a number of years he has served as Clin- 
ical Associate Professor of Medicine at 
the Cornell University School of Medi- 
cine. 

Milton Layden, '38, is located in the 
Wynnewood Towers, Baltimore 10, Md., 
and engaged in private practice of 
psychiatry. 

Stephen Lee Magness, '39, of Catons- 
ville, Md., is Assistant Medical Director. 
Chief of Psychotherapy, Taylor Manor 
Hospital, Ellicott City, Md. 

Merton T. Waite, '40, of Annapolis, 
Md., is recovering from recent surgerj 
and expects to soon return to his sur- 
gical practice. 

Phin Cohen. '52, of Brookline, Mass., 
was Board certified in Medicine in 1960, 
and a member of Senior Staff of Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston; also 
on faculty of Harvard Medical School. 
He boasts three children: Roger 7, Eric 
5, and Julia I year. 

Ursula T. Slager, '52, has been ap- 
pointed Associate Pathologist at the 
Orange County General Hospital, 
Orange, Calif. Dr. Slager also serves as 
Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 
at the University of Southern California 
School of Medicine. 

Being interested in the pathologic 
problems of flight and entry into outer 
space, Dr. Slager has recently com- 
pleted the manuscript of a book entitled 
Space Medicine which will appear in 
1962 and which will be published by 
Prentice-Hall, Inc. 

Leonard H. Flax, "53, who practices 
general surgery in Baltimore, is the 
author of a recent article entitled "A 
New Surgical Drain" which appeared in 
the Journal of the American Medical 
Association on July 15, 1961. 

Stamford A. Lavine, '54, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, is doing Orthopedic Surgery. 
He is the father of two boys. 

Paul C. Hudson, '55, who completed 
his residency in neurologic surgery at 
the University Hospital on July 1, 1961, 
has announced the opening of his office 
for the practice of neurologic surgery at 
2 East Read St., in Baltimore, Md. 

Alfred E. Iwantsch. '55, St. Clair 
Shores, Mich., writes: "Senior resident 
in Ophthalmology at the Kresge Eye In- 
stitute and Detroit Receiving Hospital 
under Dr. A. D. Ruedemann. Sr." 

Yale Lee Klugman, '55, North Car- 
olina Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill, 
N. C. is now in USAF taking residency 
in Psychiatry. 

Henry A. Baer, '56, of Melrose, 
Mass., is Senior Resident in Surgery at 
Chelsea Naval Hospital. 

Richard G. Farmer, '56, US Naval 
Hospital, Great Lakes, 111., reports: In- 
ternship Milwaukee County Hospital, 
Milwaukee, Wis., 1956-57; residency in 
Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Roch- 
ester, Minn., 1957-60. 

Marshall Franklin, '56, 2001 Cliffview 
Rd., Cleveland, Ohio, Clinical Associate 
in Cardio-pulmonary laboratory, Cleve- 
(Continued on next page) 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC 

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TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 



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King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

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208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



Edward 

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Frosted 

Foods, 

Inc. 



SERVING 

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March- April, 1962 



23 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






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THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 



Phone MUlberry 5-6070 



Baltimore 23, Md. 



land Clinic. Married, Feb. 2, 1958; two 
sons: W. Gregg, November 20. 1959 
and Marshall Mark, June 16, 1961. 

Albert V. Kanner. '56. of Madison. 
Wis., is Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 
mology, University of Wis.. School of 
Medicine. 

Sheppard G. Kellam, '56, National In- 
stitute of Mental Health. Bethesda, Md., 
and is associated with Dr. Jack Durrell 
(NIMH) in the study of sociopsycho- 
logical and metabolic factors influencing 
symptom fluctuation in psychotic pa- 
tients. 



Notes 

C. Herschel King, '56, of Glen Arm, 
Maryland, has completed residency in 
Anesthesiology at University Hospital 
and will enter private practice in Balti- 
more with a group. 

H. Coleman Kramer, '56, of Miami 
Beach, Florida, is practicing internal 
medicine and cardiology; office, 407 
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, Fla. 

M. H. M. Lee, '56, of Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia, is attending School of Public 
Health, University of California and 
working toward M. P. H. He is present- 
ly with the Heart Disease Control Pro- 
gram, U.S.P.H.S. 

Clark Lamont Osteen, '56, of Augus- 
ta, Georgia, will complete his residency 
in Anesthesiology in January 1962. 

William M. Palmer, '56, of El Paso, 
Texas, is Assistant Chief, Department 
of Pediatrics, William Beaumont Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

George T. Smith, '56, is in the De- 
partment of Pathology, Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Edwin W. Whiteford, Jr., '56, of 
Whiteford, Maryland, returned to home 
town from duty in the Air Force and 
is engaged in General Practice; one 
child, Judy Beth, Oct., 1960. 

Robert Lee Wright, '56, of Elyria, 
Ohio, is engaged in practice of Ophthal- 
mology. 

Class of 1957 

Marvin S. Arons, of Silver Spring, 
Maryland, writes: "Have completed two 
years at the National Cancer Institute 
and have had six research papers ac- 
cepted for publication. Permanent home, 
234 Wakelee Ave., Ansonia, Conn." 

Harvey R. Butt, Jr., of Annapolis, 
Maryland, completed residency in An- 
esthesiology at Ohio State University 
in June, 1960, where a Master of Med- 
ical Science Degree was conferred in 
August, 1960. Elected Fellow in An- 
esthesiology by the American College 
of Anesthesiologists in Sept., 1960. Now 
in full time practice of Anesthesiology 
and associated with a group. Daughter. 
Susan Elizabeth, born August, 1960. 

Marvin Allen Feldstein, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, is resident in Internal Medicine 
at Cleveland Clinic. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



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James I'. Laster, Division ol Ncu 

rology. University ol Washington, Se- 
attle 5, Washington, writes: "Spent two 

years in England, 15 months doing re 

search in obesitj and '> months at 

Queens Square,' doing postgraduate 

work in Neurology. Presently at Seattle 
loi a three-year program in Neurology 

(I \ss 01 1958 

Howard Daniel Bronstein. New York 
Hospital. Cornell Medical (enter, 
writes: "Two year fellowship in gastro- 
enterology." 

Raymond Frank (apian. Philadel- 
phia General Hospital. Dept. of Cardi- 
ology, Philadelphia 4. Pennsylvania, is 
NIH Research Fellow in Cardiology. 

Ernest E. Moore, (apt., M.C., USA, 
II Wheeler PL, Ft. Stewart. Georgia, 
is on active duty with U. S. Army. 

Granger G. Sutton, Jr., of Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, was discharged from active 
military service 24 June 1461 and began 
residency in Neurology at University 
of Michigan. July 1. 1961. 

Class of 1959 

Stanley Z. Felsenberg, of Baltimore, 
Maryland, is engaged in general prac- 
tice in Dundalk, Maryland, and asso- 
ciated with Dr. Bernard W. Sollod. 

Carlton I. Halle is now Captain, 
M.C., USA, on active military duty 
stationed at Seoul Military Hospital, 
Seoul, Korea; mailing address: APO 
301, San Francisco, Calif. 

Stanley S. Shocket, St. Louis Missouri, 
writes: "I have completed a one-year 
fellowship in Ophthalmology at Mc- 
Millan of the Barnes Hospital Group 
and now am completing my residency 
with two years of eye training at St. 
Louis City Hospital." 



School of 

NURSING 



Joan While 



Nurses Alumnae Association 
Meeting 

The first 1962 monthly meeting of the 
Nurses Alumnae Association was held 
on February 6. External cardiac mas- 
sage, discussed by Miss Joan White, an 
instructor in the School of Nursing, 
was explored from its birth in 1957 
to its present status in medical practice 
and implications for nursing practice. 
The graduate nursing program, one 
of 29 accredited programs in 17 states, 
received a grant of $2,905.02 from the 
National Fund for Graduate Nursing 
Education of New York City. This is 
the first year of operation for this fund 
which was conceived by Mrs. Nelson 
(Continued on next page) 



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March- April, 1962 



25 




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A. Rockefeller, Marion Folsom, former 
Secretary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, and others. The current need 
for capable nurse leaders is about four 
times that which is provided today. 
The critical shortage of bedside nurses 
across the nation and the demands of 
tomorrow*s society reflect an acute 
need for more adequately trained nurse 
leaders. 

Disbursement of the total $100,000 
was apportioned to the 29 schools by 
a formula of 40 per cent divided 
equally and 60 per cent according to 
the 1960-61 enrollment. The University 
of Maryland's allotment was higher than 
any other southern school except Cath- 
olic University of America in Wash- 
ington. D.C. 

Nightingale Notes to Library 

Through the interest and generosity of 
the Dean, Dr. Florence M. Gipe, the 
School of Nursing has enabled the 
Health Sciences Library to acquire three 
notes written and signed by Florence 
Nightingale. These autographs are on 
display in the Historical Room of the 
library. 

The messages are addressed to an 
English chemist, Mr. Piatt, M.P.S., and 
are concerned with immediate delivery 
of medical supplies to Lea Hurst, the 
Nightingale home in Derbyshire, Eng- 
land. 

According to the records left by the 
chemist, Mr. Piatt, Miss Nightingale 
"sometimes drove in a carriage to the 
chemist's establishment herself for sup- 
plies, from Lea Hurst." 

Such Nightingale items of direct 
nursing interest are very rare today, and 
their addition to the nursing historical 
collection of the Health Sciences Li- 
brary at the University of Maryland 
is of significant interest. 



School of 

PHARMACY 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
Dr. B. Oiive Cole 



Annual Entertainment and Dance 

The annual entertainment and dance of 
the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land was held on Washington's Birth- 
day, February 22, 1962, at the Emerson 
Hotel, Baltimore. The day was beauti- 
ful, without snow or sleet, which ele- 
ments caused the 1961 affair on Valen- 
tine's Day to be attended by only a 
few strong-hearts who defied the weath- 
er. The auspicious weather on Feb- 
ruary 22, 1962 brought out more than 
three hundred persons, including stu- 
dents and faculty of the School to en- 
joy the occasion. 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



President James P. Cragg, Jr., ex- 
tended the welcome and complimented 
the officers and members of the com- 
mittees for their interest and coopera- 
tion. Sam A. Goldstein, Chairman of 
the Place and Arrangements Committee, 
introduced the guests, including Dr. 
Reginald V. Truitt, President of the 
General Alumni Association of the 
University of Maryland, and Mrs. 
Truitt; David L. Brigham, Director of 
Alumni Relations, and Mrs. Brigham, 
as very special guests from College Park, 
and presented the entertainers. 

The entertainment under the super- 
vision of Chairman Ernest Snellinger, 
aided by Herman Bloom, included spe- 
cial numbers by Tony Drake, N. B. C. 
Radio City Music Hall's favorite singer, 
and the personable Lorraine Debo in 
the Bombshell of Rhythm. The music 
was by Mark Mantow and his orchestra, 
and everyone seemed spellbound by the 
elegance of the entertainment. 

The Souvenir Program, with Harold 
P. Levin, Chairman and Robert J. 
Kokoski as Vice-Chairman, was a dis- 
tinct credit to them, as it brought in 
an excess of two thousand dollars for 
the use of the Association in the selec- 
tion of prospective students and pro- 
viding those who are worthy and in need 
of financial aid with scholarships 
through the Student Aid and Scholar- 
ship Committee, and also for the work 
of the members of the Careers in 
Pharmacy Committee who inform pro- 
spective students of many aspects of 
the phramacy profession. The support 
and assistance provided by the many 
pharmaceutical friends and advertisers, 
and so generously contributed, is great- 
ly appreciated by the Association. 

The splendid work of the Ticket Com- 
mittee, with Milton J. Brownstein, 
Chairman and Milton Friedman, Vice- 
Chairman, showed that they had the 
cooperation, not only from the students, 
but from the members of the Associa- 
tion in the sale of tickets. 

A special feature of the evening was 
the amusing and entertaining contest of 
the dancers of the "Twist" and "Cha 
Cha" by the younger generation. Prizes, 
including records and a Seven-Up bot- 
tling canister, were awarded to the three 
successful contestants. 

Door prizes were donated by The 
H. B. Gilpin Company, Owens-Illinois 
Company, The Paramount Photo Serv- 
ice and Supply Company, Whitman's 
Candy, and the Seven-Up Bottling 
Company, and were distributed to those 
holding tickets of the winning numbers. 

To state the affair was a great suc- 
cess is putting it mildly, as there is 
much enthusiasm and cooperation by 
the officers, chairmen of committees 
and just plain members, which bring 
success to any undertaking of the 
Association. 

(Continued on next page) 



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generators, all wipers, speedometer!, 
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Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V_ Washington, D. C. ^J 



CRUSTY 
PIE CO. 




Finest Quality 

PIES— PASTRIES— DONUTS 
CAKES, DECORATED CAKES 

30 - O St., N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

ADams 2-7111 



NOXZEMA CHEMICAL CO. 

Makers of 

NOXZEMA SKIN CREAM AND COVER GIRL COSMETICS 

for skin health and beauty 

NOXZEMA INSTANT LATHER & BRUSHLESS CREAM 

for shaving 



Vdlaqe, Shop 
PRINCE J5E0RGE3 EINEJT MEN'5 WEAR JTORE 



Botany "500" and Hammonton Park Clothes 

Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 

6033 Baltimore Blvd.. (between Riverdale and Hyattsville) 

UNion 4-1312 



March-April, 1962 



27 



The Annual Alumni Banquet will be 
held on June 7, 1962 at The Baltimore 
Union Building. 621 W. Lombard 
Street. At that time the graduates of 
the School of Pharmacy of 1912 will 
be presented with certificates denoting 
graduation fifty years ago, and member- 
ship in the Alumni Association. The 
Distinguished Alumni of the Association 
will also be honored on that occasion. 
The graduates of 1962, with their ladies 
or escorts, will be the guests of the 
Alumni Association. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

G. Allen Sager 

Alumni Notes 

A number of Maryland alumni are 
attending the Army Command and Gen- 
eral Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas. They include: Major James D. 
Clavio, Mil. Sci., '58; Major Frederick 
V. Banse-Fay, Mil. Sci., '57; Major Wil- 
bert F. Higgins, Mil. Sci., '61; Captain 
Richard R. Duemler, Mil. Sci., '61; 
Lt. Col LaVerne H. Dahl, Mil. Sci., 
'55; and Lt. Col. Eugene J. Braun, Mil. 
Sci., '60. 

Army Lt. Col. Harry A. Sommer, '57, 
recently graduated from the Armed 
Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Army Lt. Col. Charles J. Shively, 
Mil. Sci., '61, has been assigned as 
Assistant Chief of the Operations Divi- 
sion, First U.S. Army Medical Section, 
Governors Island, New York. He com- 
pleted his studies while at the Pentagon 
and is a member of Phi Kappa Phi, 
scholastic honorary society. 

1/Lt. Robert T. Coffey, USAF, Gen- 
eral Studies, '61, recently received the 
U.S. Air Force Commendation Medal 
for meritorious achievement while serv- 
ing as Assistant Chief of air traffic at 
Tachikawa Air Base, Japan. 

Army Lt. Col. Charles L. Duke 
(Ret'd.), Military Studies, '52, has been 
Commandant of Cadets at the Mas- 
sanutten Military Academy, Woodstock, 
Virginia, since his retirement in 1961. 

Kozub Awarded Fellowship 

Mr. Jacques Jean Kozub of Paris, 
France, has been awarded a Heinz 
Fellowship for the current academic 
year by the Graduate School of Public 
and International Affairs at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 

The award, announced by Donald C. 
Stone, Dean of the School, is made 
possible through a grant from the 
Howard Heinz Endowment. It is given 
each year to Master's and Ph.D. degree 
candidates interested in professional 
preparation for administrative careers 
in the field of International Affairs. 

Mr. Kozub is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Romain Kozub of 9, rue della 



Huchette, Paris, France. He received 
his B.A. in Government and Politics 
form the University of Maryland; and 
has served with the United States Air 
Force. He was recently stationed at 
Moron Air Base in Spain, as Education 
Advisor. He is studying for a Master's 
degree in the field of International 
Affairs. 

Memorial Article in 
West Point Publication 

The fall 1961 issue of Assembly, pub- 
lication of the Association of Graduates 
of the U.S. Military Academy, carried 
an article in memory of Brig. Gen. 
Herman Beukuma (USA Ret'd.), for- 
mer Director of the European Division, 
who died in Heidelberg, Germany, in 
November, 1960. 

The article was written by Brig. Gen. 
T. D. Stamps (USA Ret'd.), Assistant 
Dean for Military Studies who, for 
many years, was an associate of Gen. 
Beukuma's on the faculty of West Point. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

Judge Elinar B. Christensen 

Judge Elinar B. Christensen, LLB, '24, 
Chief of the Montgomery County Peo- 
ple's Court, died at the age of 64. 

Judge Christensen was appointed 
chief judge of the People's Court in 
1955. His current term would have ex- 
pired in 1964. 

After serving in World War I, Judge 
Christensen entered the University's 
Law School. He began a private prac- 
tice in Baltimore after graduation, and 
later came to the Washington area to 
practice. 

He was a member of the Silver 
Spring Board of Trade, an organizer 
and first President of the Silver Spring 
chapter of Civitans. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Maryland and American Bar 
Associations, Delta Theta Phi legal 
fraternity, the American Legion, Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars and St. Luke's 
Lutheran Church in Silver Spring. 

The judge leaves his wife, daughter, 
mother, and three brothers. 

Clayton Harley 

Clayton P. Harley, College of Ag- 
riculture, '23, died February 12, 1962 
after a long illness. He was with the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Belts- 
ville Research Center for 36 years. 

Nicholas George Wilson 

Nicholas George Wilson. Jr., MD '95, 
of Norfolk, Virginia 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 14 

Advertisers Engraving Company 16 

Alcazar 20 

American Disinfectant Co 20 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 21 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc . 25 

Arnold's Village Shop 27 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 24 

Asphalt Service Co., Inc 19 

Atchison & Keller, Inc 25 

Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co 27 

Baltimore Envelope Co 24 

Bard Avon School 24 

Bergmann's Laundry 23 

Boeing Back Cover 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 17 

Edward Boker Frosted Foods, Inc 23 

Bon Ton Food Products 16 

Brentwood Inn 26 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 20 

Briggs & Company, Meat Products 18 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 23 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 20 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 10 

Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Silver Spring 17 

Crusty Pie Co 27 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 18 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters 27 

Del Haven White House Motel 17 

Domino Restaurant, Inc 25 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 19 

J. H. Filbert Co 20 

First National Bank of Baltimore 12 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 19 

John G. Fitzgerald, Plumbing and Heating .25 

Franklin Uniform Co 27 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 25 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 18 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 16 

Harvey Dairy 18 

Hotel Harrington 24 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 22 

Frank B. Jones, Optician 26 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 14 

King Bros., Inc. 23 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 25 

John D. Lucas Printing Company 17 

Lustine Chevrolet 18 

Maria's Restaurant 25 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 22 

Massey-Ferguson, Inc 23 

Modern Machinists Co 19 

McCormick Asbestos Co. 26 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc. 22 



North Washington Press, 

Northrop 

Noxzema Chemical Co. 



Inc 21 

Inside Front Cover 



Occidental Restaurant 12 

Oles Envelope Corp 20 

Olney Inn .... 18 

Ottcnberg's Bakers, Inc 18 

I 'aimer Ford 26 

Park Transfer Co. 

Poor, Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy. Inc 15 

Quaint Acres Nurseries 2<> 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 20 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 17 

Seidenspinner Realtor 20 

Shoreham Hotel 23 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 24 

Russell W. Smith. Insurance 26 

Strayer College 18 

Student's Supply Store 19 

Sweetheart Bread 14 

Thorasson Steel Co.. Inc 24 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 14 

Wallop & Son. Insurance 24 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc.. 20 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 13 

J. McKenny Willis & Son. Inc 22 

York Building Products Co.. Inc. 16 

York Wholesalers. Inc 21 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 14 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



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*r SPECIAL GUESTS-REUNION CLASSES OF 
THE COLLEGE PARK SCHOOLS 

A- CLASSES TO BE IN LIMELIGHT INCLUDE 
1912, 1917, 1922, 1927, 1932, 1937, 1942, 1947, 
1952 and 1957 



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CAREER BULLETIN FROM 



Drawing ol newl) announced short-to-medium 
range Boeing 727 jetliner. Firsl 727 sale was largest 
in transportation history. More airlines have- or- 
dered—and re-ordered— more jetliners from Boeing 
than from am other manufacturer. 




Boeing KC-135 jet tanker-transport is U.S. Air 
Force's principal aerial refueler. Forty-five C-135 
cargo-jet models of KC-135 have been ordered for 
Military Air Transport Service. 




q. 3 K v i. , 

^ !_■ led space glider is shown, in artist s 

(/5 • Alan l(J!\l for launching. Design 

^i fur conventional landing. Hoeing 
W ** lor for glider and system. 

© 




The continuing expansion of advanced pro- 
grams at Boeing offers outstanding career 
openings to graduates in engineering, scien- 
tific and management disciplines. At Boeing 
you'll find a professional climate conducive to 
deeply rewarding achievement and rapid ad- 
vancement. You'll enjoy many advantages, 
including up-to-the-minute facilities, dynamic 
industry environment, and company-paid 
graduate study programs (Masters and Ph.D.). 

For further information, write today to Mr. 
Conrad E. Brodie, The Boeing Company, 
P.O. Box 3822- U MR, Seattle 24, Washington. 
Boeing is an equal opportunity employer. 




Minuteman, nation's first solid-fuel intercontinen- 
tal ballistic missile, shown on initial flight — most 
successful first flight in missile history. Besides 
holding major Minuteman contract responsibility, 
Boeing holds primary developmental, building and 
test responsibility for SATURN S-1B booster. 




Boeing gas turbine engines power pumps on U.S. 

Arm; tug-fireboat. In other applications, Hoeing 
engines power U.S. Navy boats anil generators. 



Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories where 
scientists expand the frontiers ol knowledge in re- 
search in solid state physics, flight sciences, mathe- 
matics, plasma physics and geo-astrophysics. 




Boeing-Vertol 107 helicopter shown with famous 
Boeing 707 jetliner, world's most popular airliner. 
Boeing is world leader ill jet transportation. 




Boeing B-52H shown carrying mockups of Skybolt 
air-launch ballistic missiles. B-52s are also jet-fast 
platforms for Hound Dog guided missiles. They 
hold 11 world nonstop distance, speed records. 




Supersonic Boeing BOMARC, longest-range air de- 
fense missile in U. S. Air Force arsenal, is now 
operational al Air Defense Command bases. New 
"li" model has ranee of more than loo miles. 




Drawing of 1 L5-fool hydrofoil craft Hoeing is build- 
ing for II. S. Navy. Hiding out of water, craft will 
"fly" at speeds up to 45 knots on underw alcr wings. 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 




Volume XXXIV Number Three • May-June 1962 



•A Century of Democratic Opportunity 

•The University and the Student 

•Russia's Twenty-year Plan to Overtake America 



One hundred years ago, 

President Lincoln signed into law, 

the Morrill Act, establishing the system 

of land-grant colleges in America. 

This unique experiment in higher learning 

has flourished in the climate of democracy. 

The article beginning on page two documents 

and commemorates the achievements of the 

land-grant colleges and universities. 

The University of Maryland is proud 

of its designation as a land-grant institution. 

Professor James Wharton has drawn the 

illustration below as a salute to 

the centennial of the Morrill Act, 1862-1962. 



COPIES OF THE ILLUSTRATION MAY BE OBTAINED 
WITHOUT CHARGE BY ADDRESSING A REQUEST TO 

the editor, The Maryland Magazine, university 

OF MARYLAND AT COLLEGE PARK. 




the 




magazine 



IVIaryland 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIV Number 3 

Tin; Covkr: Spring comes again to the campus at College Park. In tins 
photograph, the viewer faces south, toward Somerset Hall, left, and Queen 
Anne's Hall — both dormitories tor women. The vernal season is a time 
of change. For a university all seasons are times of change. In a small way, 
this issue reflects the enormous on-going enterprise of a great university 
Presented within these pages are highlights of President Hlkins" annual 
convocation address; an analysis of the new Soviet 20-year economic plan 
to surpass America; news of the retirement of two academic deans; the 
story of the effect of the Land-grant Act in the history of the University; 
review of a new book. The Judicial Process in Maryland; and other items 
of information. [ ] All are reflections of a dedicated university, eager to 
teach, to serve, to learn — a university of which all her alumni may be proud. 



L* A Century of Democratic Opportunity 

D The University and the Student 

1 \J Maryland Books and Authors 

1 1 The Alumni Diary 

1 Z* Alumni and Campus Notes 

1 / Russia's Twenty- Year Plan to Overtake America 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. H0LTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
i"HOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkwav Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park. Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3, 1879. -$3.00 peryear-Fifty cents the copy-Memher of American Alumni Council. 



> 




A Century of 
Democratic Opportunity 



As the Land-Grant university of Maryland, the University of Maryland 

has opened its doors to thousands of young people who otherwise could 

not have afforded a college education. The University is proud to join 

the National celebration of the Centennial of the signing of the 

Morrill Act, establishing democratic opportunity in higher learning. 

the Maryland Magazine 



IN THE CENTER OF THE COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS STANDS 
a monument to a Vermonter who never saw the 
University but who had considerable influence in 
shaping the institution's development. 
The monument is Morrill Hall. The man was Justin 
Smith Morrill, United States Senator from Vermont, and 
author of an Act of the U. S. Congress to provide lor 

tlie endowment, support, unci maintenance oj at 
least one college [in each state] where the leading 
object shall he, without excluding other scientific 
and classical studies, and including military tactics, 
to teach such branches of learning as are related 
to agriculture, and the mechanic arts . . . in order 
to promote the liberal and practical education oj 
the industrial classes in the severed pursuits and 
professions of life. 

This year the University and the Nation celebrate the 
100th Anniversary of the signing of the Act into law. It 
was signed by President Abraham Lincoln at an hour 
when the American landscape was darkened by civil strife 
and bloodshed. 

To accomplish its purpose, the Morrill Act provided 
initially that each state should receive a grant of Federal 
land apportioned on the basis of 30,000 acres for each 
member of Congress. The income from the sale or rental 
of such land was intended to provide an endowment fund 
for the continuing support of the colleges — none of the 
monies were to be used for the physical plant. Three 
subjects were required — agriculture, mechanics and mili- 
tary tactics. Senator Morrill's Act took cognizance of the 
new class of American who was evolving from a subsistence 
farmer to a skilled agriculturist and from a carpenter and 
bricklayer to an engineer. 

In Maryland, as the war ended, the House and Senate 
of the General Assembly voted to accept the terms of the 
Morrill grant. For the reason that there was little Federal 
land in the State, Maryland received script or title to land 
in northern Alabama. The State sold this land in an all- 
inclusive parcel to an Ohio speculator for $.51V6 an acre. 
Revenue from this sale was $112,504. The money was 
invested in bonds which yielded the College about $5,300. 
The return has varied from a $8,000 high to its present 
$3,000. 

Although the yield was small, the Morrill Act paved 
the way for a great university by providing an affiliation 
with the Federal government. This affiliation gave the 
instituiton prestige and an appropriation of about $1,000,- 
000 a year. But even more important, the acceptance by 
the State of the land grant from the Federal government 
firmly linked together the State and the College. 



In Maryland ami elsewhere, the idea ol providing demo 
cratic opportunity and technical training foi the less privi 
leged provided a ringing challenge to the established 
tem oi the classical curriculum. \ud it wasn't until 1 
that the College, undei the influence ol the small farmers 
ii\' the State, began to reemphasize agricultural research 

and extension. 

In 1900, three-fourths ol the ( ollegc budge! was di- 
rected to those ends; and the State was blanketed In a 
system ol energetic agricultural agents. Largel) because 
of their assistance in every phase oi farm life, farm income 

rose loin fold between 1890 and 1920. During that period 

the College won national acclaim foi its research m soils 
analysis, fertilizer analysis and entomology. 

During the same period the College developed a small 
but excellent school of engineering which produced some 
of the outstanding engineers of the 20th Century, includ- 
ing Charles M. White. President of Republic Steel ( 
potation, and Hersehel H. Allen, builder ol the Delaware 
River and Chesapeake Hay bridges, the Baltimore I unnel. 
and other projects all over the world. 

The democratic ideal envisioned by Senator .Morrill took 
firm root in Maryland soil and today prospers as never 
before. 

"This Act," said Mr. Edward P. Holter. Vice Chairman 
of the Board of Regents, speaking at the 1961 Commence- 
ment Exercises, "was a pledge of faith with the common 
man that the ideal of democratic opportunity in higher 
education would be made available to all who demon- 
strated the capacity to learn. 

"When Abraham Lincoln signed this Act into law in 
1862 he little dreamed that the vision of Justin S. Morrill 
would be translated by the land grant university nearest 
to the Nation's Capital into a program of educational 
service that spans four continents." 

The University of Maryland is proud to join with 67 
other land-grant institutions across the Nation in celebrat- 
ing 100 years of democratic opportunity in higher learning. 

The Maryland General Assembly has issued a procla- 
mation commemorating the Centennial. 

In recognition of the influence of the Morrill Act on 
the character of the present University of Maryland. Presi- 
dent Elkins has said: 

"In a State noted for its liberal traditions since earliest 
Colonial times, the acceptance in Maryland of the terms 
of the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862 opened still another 
chapter of freedom — this time in higher learning. The basis 
for the growth of a University in Maryland to provide 
opportunity for higher education for all the people was 
assured." 



During World War I, General of the A.E.F. John Pershing addresses students and faculty in front of McDonald Hall since razed 
for the new BPA building. Note the Mat viand flag to the left, the American flag, center, and the University service flag, to the right. 






.. ^" Km Ml 



11 



rkt k*pm «wtm ****• 






Bill While's More, pictured here in 1919, since replaced by Albrechfs Pharmacy. 



An early labori 



The Morrill Act was significant for two reasons: first, 
it embodied the then revolutionary idea that everyone 
with the ability to absorb a higher education should have 
the chance to attend college; second, it provided the 
incentive on a national scale to bring this concept of 
equal educational opportunity to life. 

The proposition that all qualified young people should 
have equal access to college has been taken almost for 
granted in America during most of the past century. One 
hundred years ago this was not the case. The proportion 
of the nation's youth going on to college was small and in 
fact declining. 

One young person in 1,300 went to college in 1838, but 
by 1869 the ratio was one in 1,900. 

It looked as though higher education in this robust 
new country of vast promise was to be patterned along 
traditional lines; that the doors of college were to be 
opened only to the well-born or the wealthy few, as had 
been the case in the old country. 

The Land-Grant Act proclaimed America's independ- 
ence of this narrow view, and provided the means of mov- 
ing along the broad way that we have come. 

Today approximately one third of college-age people in 
our country are enrolled in institutions of higher learning. 



With less than six percent of the world population, the U. S. 
has about 40 percent of the university and college popula- 
tion. The following figures illustrate the place in this U.S. 
system of higher education of the Land-Grant institutions: 

□ they enroll 20 percent of the college 
population; 

□ they grant 40 percent of doctorate de- 
grees in all subjects; 

□ they confer about one-half of all doc- 
torates in the sciences, engineering, and 
in the health professions; all of those 
in agriculture, and approximately one- 
fourth of the total in the arts and 
languages, in business and commerce, and 
in education itself; 

□ the land-grant institutions train almost 
half of all regular and reserve officers 
of the armed forces through rotc pro- 
GRAMS; 

□ OF 35 LIVING AMERICAN NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS 
WHO WENT TO COLLEGE IN THIS COUNTRY, 21 
OF THE NUMBER HAVE EARNED DEGREES FROM 
LAND-GRANT INSTITUTIONS. 

The influence of the Land-Grant institutions extends 



The campus as it was in the Thirties. Buildings, left to right: hams, Chemistry (now Zoology), Agriculture (now Skinner), 
BPA and Arts and Sciences (Francis Scott Key Hall), Horticulture, Engineering (now H. J. Patterson), poultry plant. 








!_. 



*<.* 




tographed at about the turn of the century, 






Threshing wheal on the present site o) the Mall. 

Building to the left is II. J. Patterson; to the right, Silvester Hall. 



1 £ 



into the homes and working lives of all Americans, and of 
many peoples around the world. Streptomycin, the drug 
used for control and treatment of tuberculosis, was dis- 
covered at a Land-Grant university. Another Land-Grant 
university is responsible for finding and developing di- 
coumarol, the chemical substance from sweet clover that 
prevents clotting of the blood. 

Thanks in part to dicoumarol, ex-President Eisen- 
hower, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, and many others 
are living and in reasonably good health. 

The basic work on fatigue of metals that has saved the 
railroads millions of dollars was done at a Land-Grant 
institution. Others of these colleges and universities are 
responsible for the first cyclotron; for pioneering research 
in television and the transistor; for the beginnings and 
growth of hundreds of thriving industries, from ceramics 
to wood pulp and soybean processing. 

Many billions of dollars have thus been added to the 
wealth of the nation, in return for mere millions of invest- 
ment in these colleges and universities. 

One farm worker in America produces enough to feed 
himself and 23 others, an efficiency ratio without parallel 
in world history. The productivity of this country's farm 
plant is in large measure the result of work done by state 



agricultural experiment stations located at Land-Grant 
institutions. 

This record of achievement supports a basic tenet of the 
Land-Grant faith. It is the belief that the society which 
supports public colleges and universities is also its chief 
beneficiary, in terms of national strength and an advancing 
culture, and in the form o\ increased wealth, better health, 
and general well being. Associated with this belief is 
another: namely, that the value of higher education to 
those who support it is lessened every time that a qualified 
young person is denied entrance to college. 

For almost 100 years the doors to college have been 
opened wider and wider, until higher education has be- 
come the privilege of the many. Today in America, how- 
ever, there is an active concern among Land-Grant edu- 
cators that this trend may be reversing. 

The nation is up against vast educational demands that 
cannot possibly be satisfied with the talent and tools now 
at hand. About half of the students applying for higher 
education in 1970 will have to be turned away, unless 
there is a rapid buildup in college faculties and facilities. 
To meet this demand U.S. colleges and universities will 
need twice the annual funds currently available to them, 
and probably more. 



Photograph taken just prior to the 1938 Commencement at Ritchie Coliseum. 



Rossborough Inn before restoration. 1900. 
U. S. I is din road in foreground. 






The University and 



Highlights from the Convoa 



Enrollment 

Opportunity today requires a higher level of education. 
This factor, coupled with a growing population, accounts 
for the rapid increase in the enrollment of the University 
of Maryland. Although other institutions, such as the 
junior colleges, may accommodate some of the demand 
in Maryland, the University will continue to grow at a 
rate above the national average. Barring unforseen develop- 
ments, we will enroll as many as 25,000 regular day 
students by 1968. In itself, this is neither good nor bad; 
the test is on the matter of quality. 



Faculty Salaries 

The growth and improvement of the University will require 
additional faculty and facilities. Recognizing this need, the 
1962 General Assembly of Maryland continued to provide 
faculty positions proportionate to increased enrollment. 
A new range of salaries for Associate Professors and Pro- 
fessors was accepted. The University did not get everything 
it requested or needs, but the sympathetic and under- 
standing attitude of the Governor and the General Assem- 
bly is very encouraging. 



Admission and Academic Requirements 

The University of Maryland will go slowly and surely in 
requiring higher qualitative requirements for admissions. 
The faculty should examine their own standards rigorously 
and, by the use of clearly defined and absolute measure- 
ments, avoid "curving" students out of school. 

. . . Radical changes in the Academic Probation Plan 
are not anticipated, but you may look forward to some 
changes in the near future which will clarify and simplify 
the Plan. 



Expression of Student Views 

You may ask what good does it do to express your views, 
when they may not be accepted. I think it does a lot of 
good. It would be improper, of course, to give students 
authority to set academic requirements; but, it would also 
be inconsiderate to ignore the opinions of students who 
have had some experience. 



Capital Improvements 

In the area of capital improvements, the University re- 
ceived a total of $5,454,000; divided into an allocation of 
$2,772,500 for College Park, $2,077,500 for Baltimore, 
and $604,000 for Maryland State College. While this is 
the largest amount ever received in one year, it will barely 
accommodate our essential requirements for classrooms, 
laboratories, and housing. Appropriations for College 
Park include funds for a number of improvements in addi- 
tion to the first dormitory in a new complex at the corner 
of Stadium Drive and University Boulevard. 

. . . an appropriation of $130,000 was made to enable 
the University to proceed with final plans for a Fine Arts 
Building . . . 

The dormitory situation is critical. The current plan, dic- 
tated by limited funds, is to add one dormitory of five 
hundred capacity each year. The one now under construc- 
tion is a large question mark in our September 1962 plans. 

There is a possibility of another village of pre-fabricated 
houses. This will be determined by future developments. 



the Maryland Magazine 



he Student 



on Address of President El kins 



March 28, 1962 



< m 



. v . 






< 



v .*';.i 



IV 






■ ■ 

r i 




To accumulate knowledge, to organize facts, to acquires 



these are the aims 




ROTC 

The Air Force has proposed a new plan which, if approved, 
will eliminate basic ROTC and establish a subsidized 
advanced program jor those who select it and can qualify. 
Pending this change, we have not recommended any 
modification. But the time is not far off. 



Faculty Development 

. . . the University will continue to strengthen itself aca- 
demically. Faculty development through better salaries, 
recruitment of top-flight personnel, recognition of effective 
teaching, aid in the pursuit of advanced degrees, and the 
encouragement of research have been given the highest 
priority. To aid in teaching and research, millions of dollars 
have been and will be spent to improve the libraries, 
offices, classrooms and laboratories. Notable examples of 
special resources are the language laboratory, the electron 
microscope, the betatron to aid in the treatment of cancer, 
the Van de Graff generator in physics, the nuclear reactor, 
the nuclear spectrometer, and the $2,000,000 computer 
science center now being developed. Research is expanding 
at a rate of more than $1 ,000,000 annually. Honors Pro- 
grams have been approved in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and, as other undergraduate colleges add similar 
programs, an increasing number of excellent students will 
have further opportunity to develop their capacities for 
leadership. 



X 



The Ordinary Student 

As we do more to educate the superior student, we cannot 
ignore the need to do a better job with the vast majority 
of ordinary students who are capable of doing college 
work. Most of you who are listening will make "C's" and 
"B's." With a little more effort, some of you can make 
"A's" and "B's," and still remain reasonably well-rounded. 
The problem is one of motivation and application on the 
part of the student, and effective teaching and guidance 
on the part of the faculty and administration. Reports are 
encouraging, but I still hear from time to time that some 
instructors inform their classes at the beginning that one- 
third to one-half will fail. I hope that it is just an ugly 
rumor. I also hear that some courses are almost devoid 
of content. This accusation calls for inventory and reexam- 
ination. Of course, some subjects are more exciting than 
others — and this will always be true. It does not mean, 
however, that certain courses are inherently dull. We need 
to be more tolerant of individual differences, at both the 
faculty and student levels, but we do not need to tolerate 
indifference to learning or teaching. 



Tri-Mester Proposal 

There are recurring questions about a change in the Aca- 
demic calendar to a "tri-mester" or quarter plan in order 
to use facilities more fully during the summer months and 
to enable students to graduate in three years. This subject 

the Maryland Magazine 



alls, to learn to think, to develop character - 

f education; and, all of these require self-discipline. 



has been studied by a Committee of the faculty and by 
the administration. We are not convinced that facilities 
would be used much more efficiently than at present, and 
we are doubtful that any sizeable percentage of the students 
would choose to graduate in three years or should attempt 
to do so. A change to a quarter system would cost the 
State about twenty percent more in operating funds. To 
be effective, it would require a degree of compulsory attend- 
ance during the summer term or quarter. Since little if any 
money would be saved, a sound decision hinges upon 
student needs and desires. We shall continue to study the 
feasibility of a change. In the meantime, the summer school 
will be extended to eight weeks — and possibly longer. This 
will provide an opportunity for students to accelerate their 
progress toward a degree. 



Tuition and Dormitory Rates 

Next year fixed charges will be raised from $185.00 to 
$200.00, and the semester hour cost for part time under- 
graduate and for graduate students will go from $12.00 
to $15.00. Effective in June of 1962 room rent will be 
increased by a little more than 10 percent. These changes 
have been approved in order to provide the same propor- 
tionate share of expenses which have been paid by the 
student for several years and to enable the University to 
continue to operate the dormitories and dining halls on a 
self-supporting basis. They do not constitute any real 
barrier to higher education. 



Responsibilities of Social Organizations 

University officials cannot and should not be expected to 
assume responsibility for the conduct of student affairs 
under circumstances which cannot be controlled. Fraterni- 
ties, like other organizations, will prosper if they subscribe 
to and support the policies of the University; they will 
decline and eventually disappear if they give only lip 
service to their high ideals and purposes. The University 
is committed to devote its time and talents to the improve- 
ment of the individual, and this should be the central pur- 
pose of all organizations associated with it. The University 
seeks cooperation and will give support to all who merit 
encouragement. 



Athletic Competition with other Schools 

. . . intercollegiate athletics have contributed much to the 
interest in sports of all kinds and at all levels. They have 



provided facilities for physical activities used by all uu- 

dentS. While admitting that physical fitness is a national 
problem, it would he a more serious problem n organized 
athletics did not exist. True, there have been abuses m 
highly organized competition in colleges and universities, 
and we must be constantly on guard against practices that 
are detrimental to the participants and harmful to the 
schools. Sporadic abuses, however, do not call for a drastic 
change. Within the framework of sound educational poli- 
cies, the University of Maryland will continue to sponsor 
athletic teams and will strive to excel in every contest. 



The University and the Student 

The University and the student are inseparable. Faculty 
research and public services are important functions, but 
the University is identified with the student and judged by 
its value to the student. As formal education becomes more 
essential to individual opportunity and to the state and 
national welfare, the responsibilities of the colleges and 
universities become more and more awesome. If the unique 
American experiment in universal education fails, democ- 
racy will lose its vitality and purpose. The structure of 
higher education must be strengthened as we strive to 
educate the masses and at the same time improve quality. 
The individual and individuality must be recognized and 
encouraged. If individuality is submerged in a mass of 
mediocrity , this country will lose its leadership and /be- 
cause of freedom will suffer a terrible blow. 

The student has everything at stake in this gigantic effort 
to maintain quality. In a democracy where there is freedom 
of choice, the individual may choose the road to achieve- 
ment or he may take the path of least resistance. 

The important factor will be self-discipline. The Uni- 
versity can offer guidance and instruction, but it cannot 
make the final determination. Only the student can make 
this choice, and unless self-discipline is imposed from 
within it will not endure. To accumulate knowledge, to 
organize facts, to acquire skills, to learn to think, to develop 
character — these are the aims of education: and. all of 
these require self-discipline. 

The climate of the University of Maryland is improving. 
It is improving because of the direction provided by the 
Board of Regents. It is improving because of the compe- 
tence and efficiency of the faculty and staff, and because 
you — the students — are responding to the call for a better 
place in which to pursue your ambitions. As we move 
ahead, remember that there is much more within your 
reach than you realize. In this exciting age of space, the 
goals of yesterday are not enough. Our frontiers lie beyond 
the stars. 



May-June, 1962 



Maryland Books and Authors 



Head 

THE JUDICIAL PROCESS IN 
MARYLAND by Elbert M. Byrd, 
Jr. Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search. College Park: University of 
Maryland. 1961. 80 pp. $1.50. 

THE EVOLUTION OF THE MARYLAND 
judicial system from the days of 
the Proprietary of the Calverts to the 
present time is a subject of fascinating 
interest to students of government and 
lovers of historical lore. Obtaining in- 
formation about the existing court 
structure of the State is, or should be, 
important to the average citizen whose 
daily life is affected by it. Unfortu- 
nately, there has been no comprehen- 
sive treatment of the subject in a 
single volume or pamphlet until now. 
Professor Byrd's monograph supplies 
this vital need in commendable fash- 
ion. 

There have been, of course, many 
treatises on our courts and their de- 
velopment. The author frequently cites 
an article on Judicial Administration 
in Maryland by Robert G. Dixon, Jr., 
appearing in the Maryland Law Re- 
view, Vol. XVI, Numbers 1 and 2. 
He refers repeatedly to the excellent 
work of Professor Reiblich, A Study of 
Judicial Administration in Maryland 
(1929). It is also apparent that the 
author borrowed heavily from the 
book entitled The Court of Appeals 
of Maryland, a History by the late 
Chief Judge Carroll T. Bond. How- 
ever, these works, as well as numer- 
ous other bits of source material, are 
not readily available to the general 
public. 

It may well be that the paucity 
of concise, authoritative information 
about the court system is the result 
of continuing changes brought about 
in the courts throughout the years. 
As Professor Byrd observes in his 
concluding remarks, "The most char- 
acteristic feature about the judicial 
process in Maryland is that it has 
developed by growth and slow adapta- 
tion to changing conditions." Illustra- 
tive of this statement is the reorgan- 
ization of the Court of Appeals 
brought about by the constitutional 
amendment of 1942, and the creation 
of the Municipal Court of Baltimore 
City in 1960 to supplant the obsolete 
local system of justices of the peace. 

The title of this work may be some- 
what confusing to lawyers, as the 
word "Process" has a technical mean- 



by Mrs. Harold Hayes, 
, Maryland Room, McKeldin Library 
ing to them. It connotes a summons inal appeals of recent vintage- 



-a cir- 



or order requiring appearance before 
a judge, or the entire course of a pro- 
ceeding in an action at law. Evidently 
this publication is intended primarily 
to be read by laymen, so that no diffi- 
culty should be encountered over its 
title. 

Beginning with the founding of the 
colony in 1632, the author traces the 
origins of the Maryland courts through 
the colonial period to the present. 
Several interesting commentaries ap- 
pear on the troublesome days of the 
Revolution and, later, the War Be- 
tween the States. The reader learns 
that the same problems which beset 
the courts today existed in early times. 
There has always been a popular de- 
mand for speedy trials and the prac- 
tical administration of justice, as there 
should be. To accomplish this, a spe- 
cial branch of the municipal court was 
set up in Annapolis to sit during the 
semi-annual fair held there. It was 
commonly called the "court of pypow- 
dry," signifying that a trial could be 
had "as speedily as dust can fall from 
the foot" of those attending the dusty 
fair-grounds. 

Four chapters are devoted to the 
analysis of existing courts, classified 
as courts of limited jurisdiction, courts 
of general jurisdiction, the Court of 
Appeals and the courts of Baltimore 
City. The first class includes justices 
of the peace, trial magistrates, Peo- 
ple's Courts, the Municipal Court, 
Orphans Courts and the various tri- 
bunals created to hear juvenile causes. 
In this connection, it is pointed out 
that Maryland is one of the most 
decentralized states in the nation. As 
the result of home rule and local leg- 
islation, persons accused of the same 
offense may be tried before a trained 
lawyer-judge in one place or before a 
bucolic justice of the peace elsewhere. 

In discussing courts of general 
jurisdiction, specifically the Circuit 
Courts for each of the twenty-three 
counties, it is said that there are rela- 
tively few appellate decisions in crim- 
inal cases, due to the circumstance 
that our juries are the judges of the 
law as well as of the facts. Undoubt- 
edly that statement would have been 
true just a few years ago, but con- 
temporary decisions of the Supreme 
Court of the United States have al- 
tered the situation radically. As the 
result, there has been a rash of crim- 



cumstance which, in part, made it 
necessary to add two additional judges 
to the Court of Appeals. 

The description of the Supreme 
Bench of Baltimore is susceptible of 
some misunderstanding. It is stated 
that the Supreme Bench is not a court 
in the traditional sense, that it does 
not try cases and has limited appel- 
late authority. Actually, the Supreme 
Bench is a duly constituted court with 
limited power to try cases and no ap- 
pellate jurisdiction. For example, the 
Supreme Bench has exclusive power 
to try disbarment cases. It has juris- 
diction to hear and determine all mo- 
tions for new trials from the Criminal 
Court, but this is not an appellate 
proceeding. 

Brief reference is made to a quaint 
practice involving naturalization mat- 
ters. It is pointed out that two judges 
of the Supreme Bench are designated 
annually to hear and determine appli- 
cations for naturalization, as provided 
in the Charter and Public Local Laws 
of Baltimore City. As a matter of 
fact, there has not been a naturaliza- 
tion case filed in the courts of Balti- 
more City for at least thirty years. The 
practice of having any judges avail- 
able to hear such cases has been vir- 
tually forgotten. For some reason or 
other, the federal court has taken 
over in the field of naturalization. 

Unquestionably, the author did ex- 
tensive and intensive research in pre- 
paring this monograph. The product 
is easy to read and is remarkable in 
that it is completely devoid of tech- 
nical language and legal jargon. Some 
editing would be in order, especially 
since the Legislature in its 1962 ses- 
sion completely revamped the salary 
scales of judges. However, this is a 
scholarly work on the whole and 
should be required reading for stu- 
dents of law or government. Further- 
more, it should be given as wide cir- 
culation as possible, so that everyone 
may have a clearer understanding of 
the courts, their origins and the man- 
ner in which they function. 

Reviewed by Judge J. Gilbert 
Prendergast, Supreme Bench of 
Baltimore City, Eighth Judicial Cir- 
cuit. A 1933 graduate of the School 
of Law, Judge Prendergast served as 
President of the general Alumni As- 
sociation, 1956-57. 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representa 77 ves : 

A (J R I (' III. T V R I 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath, '39 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 

ARTS 4 SCIENCES 

Richard Bourne, '57 
Joseph M. Mathias, '35 

Dr. Reginald V. Irwin, '14 

BUSINESS A r V 11 l. I <■ ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Chester W. Tawney, '3 1 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 

Harry Hasslinger, '33 

Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein, '35 

I EN ('. I N E F. R I N C 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Tracy C. Coleman, '35 
Ben Dyer, '31 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman. '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke. '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 



Emory H. Niles, '17 

Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 



Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks. Jr. 
Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 



'35 



NURSING 



Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Kathryn Prokop Donnelly, '48 



PHARMACY 



Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 
• 
EX -OFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Field Secretary 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

Nurs., '47; Edu., '51 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, 'IX, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 

ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Frederick County — 

Nelson R. Bohn, '51 
"M" Club— George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

Carson S. Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



To Hi JUDGED, \ I II I Ml si hi I |\ I I), id hi READ, t BOOK Ml si Bl 
written. To be sung, a song must be composed. i<> bloom, a flower must 
be grown. To be obeyed, laws must be enacted, [o be adopted, resolutions 
must be drafted. To be completed, a race must be started. l<> be corrected, 
mistakes must be discovered. 1*0 be answered, a prayer must be offered. I" 
be remembered, an event must have transpired. 

This somewhat odd assortment of jumbled thoughts bungs forward two 
challenging words — loyalty and tradition. Day in and day out we lock 
for, hope for and attempt to do those things which will build loyalty. 
We seek a lasting devotion and dedication to the University of Maryland. We 
dream of a Utopia where such loyalty is exemplified in the lives of those 
who are a part, however small, of the University of today, tomorrow and 
yesterday. In our critical sell-analysis we absorb a portion of the burden 
which focuses attention on apathy first; then a difference in perspective, 
objectives and experience. Quite suddenly the search for loyalty ends in the 
word tradition. 

No matter how perfect the nourishment there can be little growth, or 
beauty, or strength, or concern, or even life, if the roots do not go deep. 
Tradition then becomes vital to the relationship of the alumnus and his alma 
mater. It begins with his first contact and ends only when he reaches that 
impossible point where he can say, "1 no longer need the University and it 
does not need me."" 

Perhaps those to whom alumni activity is unimportant, and there arc- 
some, have lost sight of the tradition. Perhaps, through no fault of their own, 
they did not have an experience to remember. There was a time when alumni 
leaders seriously planned a traditional spot on campus. It was envisioned as 
a shrine with trees, benches and a memorial wall upon which would be plaques 
and name plates. Here the history of the institution and the accomplishments 
of her sons would have been recorded. Here the annual parade of new faces 
would discover the roots which have given strength to past generations and 
hope to the future. Perhaps it is not yet too late. 

Tradition is a simple thing. . . . What is there of value in a Freshman- 
Sophomore tug-of-war across Paint Branch? Who cares about the visit to 
see Mae at Rossborough Inn or Class numerals on the old water tower? The 
Hallowe'en bull in Morrill Hall, the canon balls being rolled up the hill by 
cadets on hands and knees, and the horse skeleton with the phosphorous paint 
are forgotten. Police raids in the old medical building to halt illegal use of 
cadavers, the first honorary degree to General Uafayette. and George Wash- 
ington's dentures arc lost in the dust of passing time. 

It is startling to note that three-fourths of our alumni have graduated 
within the past decade. How much of the tradition did they have an oppor- 
tunity to absorb? Is it a wild dream to hope that there may yet be a Shrine 
on the University campus to link the old with the new. the great heritage 
with the brilliant future? To be judged, a life must be lived. To be remembered. 
an event must have transpired. To assure loyalty, there must he tradition! 



Sincerely. 




^h^___^ 



David L. Brighwi 

Alumni Secretary 



May- June, 1962 



II 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF 



JNE 




16 


1 


Pre-Examination Study Day 


18-23 


2-8 


Spring Semester Examinations 


25 


3 


Baccalaureate Exercises, College 
Park 


26 


3 


Commencement Exercises, Eu- 


JULY 




ropean Division, Heidelberg, 


4 




Germany 




9 


Commencement Exercises, Col- 
lege Park 





Baltimore Club Annual Outing 
Rural Women's Short Course 
Summer Session Registration 
Summer Session Begins 



ACTIVITIES 
AUGUST 

3 Summer Session Ends 
6-11 State 4 H Club Week 



Independence Day, Holiday 



SEPTEMBER 

4-7 Firemen's Short Course 
17-21 Fall Semester Registration 
24 Instruction Begins 




78 Win Degrees in Tokyo 

The University of Maryland started 
down the 1962 Commencement trail on 
March 25 when 78 U. S. servicemen and 
civilians received bachelor's degrees in 
commencement ceremonies in Tokyo. 

The occasion was the fifth annual 
formal commencement of the Univer- 
sity's Far East Division. More than 
1 ,200 invited guests observed the 5 1 
students receive their degrees in person 
from Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Executive 
Vice President of the University. 

U. S. Ambassador to Japan, Edwin 
O. Rcischauer. delivered the commence- 



ment address and was awarded an hon- 
orary doctor of law degree. A similar 
degree was awarded to former Japanese 
Education Minister, Tamon Maeda. 

University College Dean, Ray Ehrens- 
berger, presided, and was assisted by Dr. 
Leslie R. Bundgaard, Director of the 
Far East Division. Music was furnished 
by the Fifth Air Force band and the 
Aoyama Gakuin Chorus. 

Ambassador Reischauer, who was 
born and schooled in Japan and is an 
expert on Japanese affairs, told the grad- 
uates that although the U. S. "faces 
grave problems at home, it is the solu- 
tion of foreign affairs problems that 
spells life or death to our Nation." 



He said that "a broad knowledge of 
the world outside our country" is essen- 
tial to the solution of foreign affairs 
problems and urged the graduates to 
accept "the duty to broaden your hori- 
zons and so bring back to the U. S. a 
deeper understanding of the Far East." 

The Ambassador cited three ways in 
which persons stationed in the Far East 
can attain a broader understanding of 
that part of the world: 

Through intelligent, purposeful read- 
ing, through penetrating analytical ob- 
servation, and through getting to know 
the people. 

The graduates were among some 
5,000 students who attend evening 
classes on a part-time basis at 45 mili- 
tary installations in Japan, Okinawa, 
Korea, Taiwan, and Guam. They in- 
cluded 31 Army and 27 Air Force per- 
sonnel, 19 civilians, and a U. S. Navy 
officer. 

Forty-four of the graduates were 
awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
General Studies and 34 Bachelor of 
Science degrees in Military Studies. The 
average of the graduates was 36.8 years. 

On Sunday, June 3, an estimated 140 
persons are expected to graduate in the 
European Division Commencement in 
Heidelberg, Germany. The following 
week, Maryland will come to the end 
of this year's commencement trail with 
the annual spring graduation exercises 
on the College Park campus. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



Mr. Paul-Henri Spaak will be the 

principal speaker at the European Dm 
sion Commencement ceremonies. 

Maryland Governor J. Millard I awes 
will accompany Dr. Elkins to Europe 
and will extend greetings to the Euro- 
pean Division Class of 1962. Mrs. Elkins 
and Mrs. Tawes will also make the trip. 

Dr. Spaak. popularly known as "Mr. 
Europe" because of his leadership in 
establishing the European Economic 
Community and urging a European po- 
litical union, will receive an honorar\ 
doctor of law degree from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

U. S. Ambassador to West Germany 
Walter C. Dowling will also be present 
for the ceremonies and will receive the 
honorary doctor of law degree. 

Approximately 1.500 military and 
government officials will attend the cere- 
monies held in the Neue Aule of historic 
Heidelberg University. University Col- 
lege Dean Ray Ehrensberger will pre- 
side and will be assisted by Dr. Mason 
G. Daly. Director of the European 
Division. 





University of Maryland students who are recipients oj fellowships awarded by 
The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation meet with President 
Elkins. From left to right: President Elkins, Mr. Wehman, Mr. Colitis and 
Mr. Halstead. 



Woodrow Wilson Awards 

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellow- 
ship Foundation has awarded fellow- 
ships to three University of Maryland 
seniors and accorded honorable men- 
tion to five others. 

To be used for first year graduate 
study, each fellowship includes a year's 
tuition and fees at a graduate school of 
the recipient's choice. 



dr. alius o. Kins, Executive Vice President of the University, addressed 
members of the Prince Georges County Alumni Association and ( niversit) 

faculty on April 13 at the Student Union Building. 

Title of Dr. Kuhn's address was "Here and Now — Your Slate I niversity." 
Dr. Jack Cronin, President of the Club, is shown standing. 



he is the son ol Mr. and Mrs. John 
Wehman of 84 Alpine Dr.. Wayne, New 
Jersey. At the University he is a mem 
her oi the national histors honorary 
fraternity, Phi Alpha Theta, and the 
scholastic honorary. Phi Kappa Phi. 

Juris Calitis. also a student in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, is a 
philosophy major. He attended high 
school in England, and at the University 
is the Vice President of the Men's Glee 
Club. He is the son of leva Calitis, 4915 
Taylor St., Bladensburg. 

Mr. James F. Halstead. an economics 
major in the College of Business and 
Public Administration, is a 1958 grad- 
uate of Bladensburg High School. A 
member of the professional business 
fraternity, Delta Sigma, and member 
of the Economics Discussion Club, he 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Oeorgc \\ 
Halstead of Glenn Dale. 

Those accorded honorable mention 
are: Harold W. Byers. Jr.. of College 
Park; Sallie A. Harwood of Riverdale; 
Richard L. Imlay oi Wheaton; Roger 
Poppen of Rockville; and Phillip R. 
Rogers of Jacksonville. 



Committee on Vocational 
Education 

At a recent meeting, B. Herbert Brown, 
University Regent and President of the 
Baltimore Institute, participated as ,i 
member of an Advisory Group to the 
President's Committee on Vocational 
Education. 

The meeting was held in one ot the 
conference rooms of the U. S. Office ot 
Education, Washington. D. C. 

CONTINUED ON III! NEX1 P \GE. 



Acceptance of a Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowship places a moral obligation on 
the student to complete at least a year 
of graduate work and seriously consider 
entering the teaching profession. 

Recipients of the fellowships are 
Howard H. Wehman, Juris Calitis. and 
James F. Halstead. 

Wehman, a history major in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, is specializing 
in African Studies. A 1956 graduate ol 
Belleville High School in New Jersey, 



Max-June, 1962 



13 



Vocational Education 

Mr. Brown was the only private busi- 
ness school man on this Committee 
winch was comprised of college educa- 
tors and representatives from national 
organizations such as: The American 
\ ocational Association, National Office 
Management Association, and the U. S. 
Department of Commerce. 

On February 19, 1961, President 
Kennedy stated in a speech that he 
would convene a committee to study 
the need for more vocational education 
with the thought of having the com- 
mittee spell out the Federal role to be 
played by the U. S. Government with 
a view to preparing legislation for na- 
tionally improving and expanding voca- 
tional education. 

Dental Alumnus Receives 
Gorgas Society Award 

Dr. Harold Russell Stanley, '48, School 
of Dentistry, Assistant Chief of the 
Clinical Investigations Branch of the 
National Institute of Dental Research, 
is the first recipient of an award for 
outstanding contribution to dentistry 
established by the Gorgas Odontological 
Society, honorary dental society of the 
University of Maryland School of 
Dentistry. 

The award was made at a dinner 
dance April 14 in Baltimore. Dr. Myron 
S. Aisenberg, Dean of the School, was 
toastmaster, and George Goodreau, 
President of the Society, presented the 
award to Dr. Stanley. 

Fund Allocates $25,000 
To Faculty Program 

Twenty-five thousand dollars has been 
allocated by the University's Board of 
Regents from The Greater University 
of Maryland Fund for use in the Uni- 
versity's Distinguished Faculty Program. 

This program was given top priority 
as a fund objective for 1961. 

The Distinguished Faculty Program 
makes available funds to University 
faculty for advanced study, faculty in- 
ternships and faculty projects for re- 
search and education, as well as for 
distinguished professorships. 

Howard Filbert, National Fund Can- 
vass Chairman, said recently that The 
Greater University of Maryland Fund 
was running 20 percent ahead of last 
year. The 1962 general canvass began 
on March 23 and concluded on April 13. 

The Distinguished Faculty Program 
is the Fund's first objective again this 
year. Other programs which will receive 
alumni support include strengthening of 
cultural and research activities on both 
the College Park and Baltimore cam- 
puses and student aid in all schools and 
colleges of the University. 



Drug used Successfully on Psychiatric Patients 



More than 5,000 psychiatric patients 
have now been successfully treated with 
Indoklon, a drug substitute for electro- 
shock therapy developed by Dr. John 
C. Krantz, Jr., Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology, School of Med- 
icine, and his associates. 

At a symposium in New Orleans held 
by 14 investigators who cooperated in 
developing, synthesizing, and testing 
Indoklon, reports showed that patients 
are much more willing to accept Indok- 
lon than shock treatment. 

It is now possible to administer the 
shock treatment without producing con- 
vulsions, as was formerly thought neces- 
sary. This is accomplished by first giving 



a short-acting anesthetic and a muscle 
relaxant. But even with this advantage, 
the shock therapy is repugnant to many 
patients and their families. 

Although Idoklon is a convulsant 
drug, it is now also possible to admin- 
ister it without producing convulsions. 
At first, patients were given the drug 
by inhalation, but the most recent meth- 
od is intravenous injection. By using the 
same expedient as with electroshock — 
simultaneous administration of anes- 
thetic and muscle relaxant — the convul- 
sive effect is avoided even though the 
brain is thrown out of rhythm in a way 
that results in relief of certain psychi- 
atric disorders. 




Daniel W. Moylan, '61, presents the Roger Howell Award Plaque to Dean 
Howell. See article on this page reporting the testimonial banquet given in honor 
of Dean Howell by the Law Alumni Association. 



Banquet Held in Honor of Dean Howell 



The Alumni Association of the School 
of Law held its annual banquet, April 7, 
as a testimonial to Dean Roger Howell, 
who will retire from the School of Law 
at the end of June 1962. 

Professor A. James Casner, Associate 
Dean and Weld Professor of Law at 
Harvard School, formerly of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, delivered the prin- 
cipal address in honor of Dean Howell. 
The outgoing President of the Alumni 
Association, The Honorable Emory H. 
Niles, was toastmaster. 

The toastmaster, on behalf of the 
Alumni Association, presented the Uni- 
versity with a fund to endow in perpetu- 
ity a scholarship at the law school in 
honor of Dean Howell. The fund was 
endowed by money collected from the 
alumni and increased by gifts from the 
graduating class of 1961-1962, and other 
friends. Judge Niles also presented Dean 
Howell with two bound volumes of tes- 



timonial letters from the Board of Re- 
gents, the President of the University, 
faculty members, judges, and attorneys, 
many of whom were former students. 

Members of the Alumni Association 
presented him with a silver tray and 
pitcher. And Dean Howell presented a 
gift to his former secretary, Mrs. Ger- 
trude M. Anderton, who retired last year 
after 37 years of service. 

The graduating class of 1961-1962 
presented and welcomed the prospective 
members of the association and of the 
bar. Dean Howell presented the school's 
customary honors and awards. 

Mr. Daniel W. Moylan, the class 
President of 1960-1961, presented a 
plaque, The Roger Howell Award, to 
Dean Howell. The Roger Howell Award 
was established by the class of 1961 in 
Dean Howell's honor for scholarship and 
leadership. 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 






Some Recent Grams 
to the University 

For research on foundations of 

scattering theory and application to 

physical problems. 

U. S. AIR FORCE TO DEPARTMENT OF 

PHYSICS 

$40,000. 

For experimental and theoretical 
research on gravitation. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

$95,900. 

* 

For research dealing with relation- 
ship of metabolism to embryological 
development of ascaris lumbricoides 
var. suum. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY AND 

PHYSIOLOGY 

$20,000. 

* 

For graduate training in space-re- 
lated sciences and technology. 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE 
ADMINISTRATION TO GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 
$90,000. 

For mapping estuarine meanders. 

U. S. NAVY TO DEPARTMENT OF 
GEOGRAPHY 

$4,048. 
* 

For research on the enzyme con- 
taining a product known as Nopgro. 

NOPCO CHEMICAL COMPANY TO DE- 
PARTMENT OF DAIRY HUSBANDRY 
$3,000. 

For a summer institute for secon- 
dary high school teachers of French 
and Spanish. 

U. S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION TO THE 
DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LAN- 
GUAGES 

$83,246. 

For an in-service institute in physics 
for secondary school teachers. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

$20,770 

For investigation of the physics of 
the solid state. 

U. S. ARMY TO THE DEPARTMENT OF 
PHYSICS 

$304,000. 




Dean Smith to Devote 
Time to Teaching and 
Research 

Dr. Leon P. Smith, Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, will relinquish his 
administrative office in June in order 
to complete a 30-year-old research 
project and to teach graduate courses. 

Dr. Charles W. Manning, Associate 
Dean of the College, who has been on 
the University of Maryland faculty since 
1946, has been appointed Acting Dean. 

Dean Smith has been working for 30 
years on a medieval French romance, 
Partonopeus de Blois, which was pub- 
lished once before in 1834. He wrote 
his doctoral dissertation on this text and 
has since published fragments of it, the 
latest in August, 1961. 

Resuming his full professorship in the 
Department of Foreign Languages, 
Dean Smith will offer graduate courses 
in old French and the history of the 
French language next year. 

He is internationally known in the 
field of old French literature and lin- 
guistics, and is held in high esteem by 
members of the faculty and students. 

Under his direction, considerable de- 
velopments have taken place in science 
— especially physics, the classics, music 
and the graduate program. Dean Smith 
established the academic advising pro- 
gram for the College and has been 
active on the Public Functions Com- 
mittee. 

A native of LaGrange, Georgia, he 
received his A.B. from Emory Univer- 
sity in 1919, and his M.A. and Ph.D. 
from the University of Chicago in 1928 
and 1930. 

Dean Smith served in both World 
Wars. Beginning as a private in 1918, 
he served in the Army, Navy and the 
National Guard in the area of military 
intelligence, also teaching military sci- 
ence and tactics. He retired as a captain 
in the Naval Reserves in 1958. 

His publications range from disserta- 
tions on old French manuscripts to clas- 
sified textbooks for naval personnel. Be- 



fore coming to Maryland in 1949, he 
was Dean ol Arts and Sciences .it the 
I niversit) ol ( ieorgia, Dean ol 
dents at the I niversit) ol < hicago, and 
head ol foreign languages al Wash 
ton and I ee I 'niversity. 

He is a member i>i Phi Beta Kappa, 
Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Phi, Phi 
Kappa Phi, and Sigma l psilon. 



Television at Maryland 

Over si\ thousand students are taking 

at least one basic course via the closed 

circuit television system at the Univer- 
sity ol Maryland. The closed-circuit 
system is operated independent!) ol the 
program ol IV instruction in broadcast- 
ing for students, except that camera men 
are hired as a result ol their training 

in television courses. Instructional tele- 
vision is under the management ol the 

division of radio/TV in the Speech and 
Drama Department, and the shows are 
directed by faculty members or gradu- 
ate assistants. 

The extent of the facilities for closed- 
circuit covers 5 classrooms in Woods 
Hall, 1 1 classrooms in Francis Scott 
Key Hall, I 1 classrooms in the Armory 
and 5 classrooms in the Foreign Lan- 
guage Building. Immediate plans include 
the expansion to 14 classrooms in the 
Math Complex. 

Four courses are presently being 
taught in Sociology, Zoology, Spanish, 
and Air Science. In the Fall Semester. 
Mathematics and the lecture portion of 
Public Speaking will be added to the 
schedule. 

The physical plant available for tele- 
casting and television instruction in- 
cludes a studio with adequate lighting, 
three vidicon camera chains, one slide 
and film chain, a complete control room, 
an announcer's booth, and an additional 
space for racks, storage space, and a 
video tape recorder. These facilities are 
superior to those of any other institu- 
tion of higher learning in the greater 
Baltimore-Washington area. 

The radio television division has 
three staff members and a full-time en- 
gineer, plus 3 or 4 graduate assistants 
who assist with undergraduate instruc- 
tion and laboratory work. The courses 
in this division deal primarily with the 
programming aspects of broadcasting 
instead of the highly technical aspects 
which are taught in the College of Engi- 
neering. Courses such as introduction to 
radio and television, production, an- 
nouncing, news and public affairs, audi- 
ence analysis, television direction and 
station management are typical courses 
taught in the radio TV division. In an) 
given year, from 30 to 40 sophomore, 
junior, and senior students are listed as 
undergraduate majors in speech empha- 
sizing radio and television. 10 or 12 
usually graduate with a Bachelor ol 
Arts degree each year. 



May-June, 1962 



15 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 

Heagy Named State Chemist 

The Maryland State Board of Agricul- 
ture has named Albert B. Heagy as 
State Chemist in charge of the State 
Inspection Service. He will succeed 
Leslie E. Bopst who will retire in June 
after 39 years of service. 

The State Inspection Service, establish- 
ed at the turn of the century, is charged 
with inspection to maintain quality of 
all feeds, fertilizer, agricultural liming 
materials, certain supplements, and pest- 
icides sold or offered for sale in the 
State of Maryland. Statutes under which 
the service operates call for certain in- 
formation on every label attached to 
these commodities, including the brand 
name, net content, chemical guarantee, 
directions for use and the manufac- 
turer's name and address. 

All commodities are given chemical, 
microbiological, and microscopic exam- 
inations, and labels are checked for mis- 
leading or extravagant information by 
the inspection service. 

Mr. Heagy joined the State Inspec- 
tion Service in 1930 following his grad- 
uation from the University of Maryland 
College of Arts and Sciences. He has 
had wide experience in the registration 
and enforcement of the Maryland Agri- 
cultural Insecticide and Fungicide Law. 

With the Faculty 

Dr. Ronald Bamford, Dean of the 
Graduate School, was named Vice Pres- 
ident of the Southern Association of 
Land Grant Colleges and State Univer- 
sities. 

Dr. W. W. Green, Animal Husbandry, 
was a guest professor at the Washington 
State University Stockman's Short 
Course. 

Dr. Mark Keeney, Dairy, participated 
in a number of symposia throughout 
the nation in regard to flavor chemistry 
c<nd quality of foods. 

Dr. W. S. Arbuckle, Dairy, has com- 
pleted his book on Ice Cream and Re- 
lated Products. 

Professor A. B. Hamilton, Adminis- 
tration, participated in the World Food 
Forum in Washington, D. C. 

The Department of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics has three new members on its 
staff: Dr. Phillips W. Foster, Associate 
Professor; Dr. J. Paxton Marshall, As- 
sistant Professor; and Dr. James E. 
Martin, Assistant Professor. 

Dr. Amihud Kramer and Dr. B. A. 
Twigg, Horticulture, have published 
Fundamentals <>l Quality Control in The 
load Industry. 



Loper In Signal Corps 

Gerald M. Loper, '58, has completed 
the radio teletype course at the Signal 
Training Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia. 
He was trained to transmit and receive 
code communications including security 
and methods of getting messages through 
radio jamming in combat. 

Dr. Romoser Joins Chemical 
Company 

Dr. G. Lynn Romoser, '51, has been 
appointed supervisor for animal nutri- 
tion products in the Marketing Depart- 
ment of the Monsanto Chemical Com- 
pany. 

New Uses For Spuds 

Harry H. Harp, '54, a staff member of 
the Market Potentials Branch of the 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, has published an article on the 
processing of potato products. 

Potatoes have taken on a new look, 
due to their widely accepted processed 
products and a bright future is predict- 
ed. According to studies by Harp "over 
25 percent of the output of potatoes is 
now used by processing plants." The 
main uses are for frozen French fries 
and dehydrated mashed potatoes. 

GOLDSBOROUGH HEADS FOOD PROGRAM 

George H. Goldsborough, '40, has been 
appointed Director of the Matching 
Fund Program, conducted by the USDA. 
Goldsborough takes to his new post 
broad knowledge of marketing of agri- 
cultural products, wide acquaintance 
with marketing people, and familiarity 
with marketing work being done in the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

In his new post Mr. Goldsborough 
will work with Departments of Agricul- 
ture of the States, and with their Bureaus 
of Markets, to foster more efficient dis- 
tribution of food and farm products 
through development of improved mar- 
keting services, as directed in the 
"matching fund" provisions of the Agri- 
cultural Marketing Act of 1946. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Staff of the College 



Personal Notes 

1st Lt. Marvin E. Schlosser, '57, com- 
pleted the eight-week officer orientation 
course at The Infantry School, Fort 
Benning, Georgia, March 6. 



W. Roland Knapp, '59, returned to 
the United States after completing a 
twenty-one month tour with the Army 
in Wiesbaden, Germany. Mr. Knapp 
will resume his duties as a Probation 
Officer with the Supreme Bench of Bal- 
timore City. At the University he ma- 
jored in Criminology and took his minor 
in Psychology. 

Patricia Callahan, '57, was married 
February 17, to Gerard DeSimone, Sac- 
ramento, California. 

John Stopa, '58, has accepted the 
position of an Accountant for Sanders 
Associates, Inc., in the Washington, 
D. C, office. 

2nd Lt. William T. Clagett III, '60, 
has been awarded the U. S. Air Force 
navigator wings after completing navi- 
gator training at James Connally A.F.B., 
Texas. He will be assigned to Mather 
A.F.B., California, for advanced train- 
ing as a navigator bombardier. 

1st Lt. Phillip L. Melvin, '59, is as- 
signed to a U. S. Air Force unit now 
participating in Exercise Banyan Tree 
111 in Rio Hato, Panama. Lt. Melvin is 
a transport C-123 Pilot permanently 
assigned to a unit of the Continental Air 
Command at Pope A.F.B., North Caro- 
lina. He will return there upon comple- 
tion of the exercise. 

Leroy E. Kagle, '58, will receive the 
M.D. degree in June from Washington 
University School of Medicine, St. 
Louis, Missouri. He will serve his in- 
ternship year at Cincinnati General 
Hospital. 

Winship I. Green, '26, President of 
the Farmers Bank and Trust Company, 
Rockville, Montgomery County, has 
been elected to the Board of Directors 
of the Potomac Electric Power Com- 
pany. 

Lt. Col. William J. Walker, '57, com- 
mander of headquarters of the Division's 
15th Cavalry in Schwabach, Germany, 
recently participated in a combined 
arms phase of the five-week 4th Arm- 
ored Division field training exercises in 
the Grafenwohr-Hohenfels area of Ger- 
many. 

Kenneth W. Garrison, '61, has recent- 
ly joined the staff of the Computation 
Department of the University of Cali- 
fornia Radiation Laboratory in Liver- 
more, California. 

Kenneth R. Thornton, '58, has been 
appointed Sales Representative in Mary- 
land, Washington, D. C, and Virginia 
for Stanley Tools, New Britain, Con- 
necticut. 

Martin Jay Goldberg, '57, received 
his D.D.S. degree from Howard Uni- 
versity School of Dentistry last spring 
and is now a Lieutenant with the U. S. 
Air Force stationed in Georgia. He and 
his wife, the former Gloria Wolf, also 
a graduate of Maryland, have two girls. 

continued on page 21. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



RUSSIA'S 

TWENTY-YEAR PLAN 

TO OVERTAKE 

AMERICA 



by DR. NORTON T. DODGE, Assistant Professor of Economics, 
currently on leave for study at the Russian Research Center, Harvard University. 
His research is being supported by a Ford Foundation Faculty Research Fellowship. 



T 



|HE DISSENSION WHICH SHATTERED THE MONOLITHIC FACADE OF THE 22ND 

Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in October tended to 
overshadow the unanimous endorsement by the Congress of an ambitious 20- 
year program for overtaking America and building a communist society. While 
the attacks launched against Stalin, the anti-party group, and Albania (as a substi- 
tute for China) are already history, Premier Khrushchev's 20-year plan promises to 
remain for many years the most comprehensive and fundamental blueprint for the 
advance of Soviet society. 

This program sets forth the party's grand design for the development of indus- 
try, agriculture, and living standards and establishes goals to be achieved in the 
transition from the stage of socialism, when goods are distributed according to a 
person's contribution, to communism, when goods are distributed according to need. 
In the next two decades, according to Khrushchev, an "abundance of material and 
cultural wealth" will be assured the entire Soviet population and the threshold of 
communism reached. The complete building of communism, however, is to be com- 
pleted later and undoubtedly will be the subject of yet another party program at 
some future congress. 

May-June, 1962 



17 




THE LAST PARTY PROGRAM OF SUCH COMPREHEN- 
sive scope was adopted at the Eighth Congress 
held in 1919. During the four decades which have 
followed, the party has pursued with singleminded 
purpose and with little regard for human costs a Draconic 
policy of forced industrialization. The peasantry, the fac- 
tory workers — people in all walks of life — were repeatedly 
asked to make sacrifices for the future. Yet, despite the 
great gains achieved in heavy industry, the promised future 
always seemed to recede as the years passed and to remain 
as unattainable as ever. It is understandable that Khrush- 
chev, proud of the gains achieved under his leadership, 
should feel that the time had finally come to reveal more 
concretely the shape of the future and to provide a specific 
timetable for the advance toward communism. 

The new program was designed to justify both the party's 
past policies and its future plans. As Khrushchev declared: 

THE PARTY'S THIRD PROGRAM HERALDS 
THE COMING OF A PERIOD IN WHICH ALL 
THE DIFFICULTIES AND PRIVATIONS WHICH 
THE SOVIET PEOPLE HAVE ENDURED FOR 
THE SAKE OF THEIR GREAT CAUSE WILL BE 
MADE GOOD A HUNDREDFOLD. 

(Pravda, October 18, 1961). 
The choice of an unprecedented 20-year perspective is 
understandable in this context — the goals seem attainable 
by this generation yet are far enough removed to avoid 
contradiction by existing conditions. Presumably party 
workers armed with the new and more potent slogans sup- 
plied by the program will be better able to mobilize popular 
support for the party's policies at home and abroad. 

The program is also aimed at communist parties in other 
countries and represents a bid by the Soviets to maintain 
their doctrinal leadership in the communist camp. It at- 
tempts to show that no shortcuts to communism are possible 
and that the Soviet Union will lead the march to commu- 
nism. The premature attempt by the rival Chinese to decree 
"full communism" through the establishment of com- 
munes was sharply criticized by implication. Khrushchev 
emphasized that to decree the introduction of communism 
before the necessary conditions have matured is an irrepar- 
able mistake which compromises the idea of communism 
and delays its advance. Khrushchev declared more recently, 

COMMUNISM MUST NOT BE REGARDED AS 
A TABLE SET WITH EMPTY PLATES, AROUND 
WHICH SIT HIGH-MINDED AND FULLY 
EQUAL PEOPLES. TO INVITE PEOPLE TO 
SUCH COMMUNISM IS TANTAMOUNT TO 
INVITING PEOPLE TO EAT SOUP WITH A 
FORK. THIS WOULD BE A CARICATURE OF 
COMMUNISM. (Pravda, March 6, 1962). 

Finally, the program was directed toward the less devel- 
oped countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America for 
whom even the present low standard of living in the Soviet 
Union represents a vast improvement. If the 20-year plan 
is successful, the Soviet Union will have travelled the path 
from poverty to affluence and power in little more than 
sixty years. This example — even though now only a possi- 
bility — can be expected to exert a powerful attraction for 
the leaders of the less developed countries. 

What are in fact the prospects for fulfilling Khrushchev's 
ambitious program? Is the plan realistic, or is it a propa- 
ganda myth? While it is impossible to look ahead 20 
years with much confidence, it is possible to compare 
future goals with past performance and to identify some 
of the more important problems and inconsistencies in the 



18 



plan. The program, it should be noted, is not a plan in 
the usual sense of a one-year, five-year or, more recently, 
seven-year plan. It is quite general in character and presents 
only a limited number of targets which have not been 
fully integrated with one another. Among the more im- 
portant of these targets are the planned 6 fold increase in 
gross industrial output, the 3.5 fold increase in agricultural 
output, the 5 fold increase in national income, and the 
4.5 fold increase in consumption. 

The prospect for achieving the scheduled six-fold in- 
crease in industrial production is fairly good. This means 
an annual increase in output of almost 10 percent as a 
result of an increase of slightly more than 10 percent in 
the production of producers goods and of 8.5 percent in 
consumers goods. The greater emphasis on producers 
goods reflects the established Soviet policy of favoring the 
capital goods industry in order to promote growth. But 
emphasis on heavy industry has been somewhat softened 
in the 20-year plan. These rates of increase are all in line 
with the actual performance of Soviet industry during 
the past five years. 

The weakest link in the plan is the agricultural sector. 
During the past decade when various reforms in admin- 
istration, organization and incentives were introduced and 
the sown area increased by a third through the opening 
of the "virgin lands," a 60 percent increase in agricultural 
output was achieved — largely during the period from 1954 
through 1958. Following the bumper crop year of 1958, 
however, a progression of poor harvests and failures in 
meat and dairy production led to near stagnation in output. 
It is against this background of trouble that the ambitious 
goals for agriculture must be measured. 

During the next decade, agricultural production is 
scheduled to grow 2.5 fold, and a 3.5 fold increase is 
planned for the entire 20-year period. While the goal of 
an annual increase in output of almost 10 percent during 
the first decade seems sheer phantasy, the 3.4 percent 
annual increase scheduled for the second decade is reason- 
able. Indeed, the difficulty of achieving the first goal has 
been confirmed by the Premier's own testimony at the 
recent Party Plenum following the 22nd Congress which 
was devoted to the current agricultural crisis. 

As remedies Khrushchev has proposed the following: 
1. radical changes in the crop rotation system to produce 
more animal fodder; 2. further expansion of the sown areas 
through irrigation and reclamation; 3. new regional farm 
administrations to coordinate farm management; 4. in- 
creased production of farm machinery and chemical fer- 
tilizers; and 5. new material incentives, as yet unspecified. 
But the reasons for the chronic lag in agriculture lie 
deeper. At the present low level of productivity the gov- 
ernment is unable to provide adequate material incentives 
without sacrificing other sectors of the economy. Hence, 
the peasantry are reluctant to work on the collective land 
where the returns are low. The top-heavy agricultural 
administration also suffers from excessively centralized 
decision making and confused lines of authority, particu- 
larly at the local level. This situation is not likely to be 
improved by more centralization. 

In coping with these problems the party is trapped in a 
major contradiction: without a sharp rise in agricultural 
production it will be impossible to build communism, yet 
to achieve the rise in output required it may be necessary 
to depart from communist principles of agricultural or- 
ganization. There are no indications, however, that any 
such departures are contemplated. As a result, the present 
difficulties in agriculture may be expected to continue. 

the Maryland Magazine 



FAILURE TO FULFILL THE 20-YEAR AGRICULTURAL 
plan will make achievement of the national in- 
come goals highly questionable. A five-fold in- 
crease over the next two decades has been 
planned, but the best Western estimates suggest that a 
3.5 to four-fold increase is more probable. Furthermore, 
to the extent that the standard of living is dependent upon 
agriculture it is unlikely that the planned 4.5 fold increase 
in consumption can be achieved. Agricultural performance 
determines, of course, not only the supply of food but also 
the availability of such consumer items as textiles, clothing, 
leather shoes, and the like. On the other hand, the outlook 
for consumer durables is more favorable, but no specific 
promises can be found in the plan. The response of Soviet 
citizens to this part of the plan may be further dampened 
by Khrushchev's statement that many of the requirements 
of the population are to be met by the establishment of 
communal kitchens, laundries, and repair shops. Clearly 
the aim of this feature of the program is not only to 
conserve resources but also to free additional women, who 
already make up 48 percent of the non-agricultural labor 
force, for work outside the home. With regard to housing, 
consumers are promised a tripling of housing space by 
1980. If this goal is achieved, it will mean about 11 to 12 
square meters of space per person, a modest aim by 
European or American standards. It is doubtful, however, 
that these goals can be achieved since housing has tradi- 



tionally been expendable if fulfillment of the higher priority 
industrial sector of the plan should be threatened. ( )t 
course, the entire consume! picture could change radically 
for the better if disarmament became a reality. 

Interestingly, the good life depicted by Khrushchev 
seems much like the "bourgeois affluence" already achieved 
in the United States. There are some differences, however, 
which Khrushchev undoubtedly felt necessary to differen- 
tiate the promised communist plenty from existing capital- 
ist luxury. In addition to providing more of the good 
things in life, the plan calls for the eventual abolition of 
all charges for housing, utilities, local transport, school 
supplies, and so forth. By 1980 half of consumption is to 
be provided the public communally at no cost. 

The prospects for fulfilling this aspect of the plan are 
good, although the benefits to the consumer are doubtful. 
Whether the consumer pays directly for services or 
through taxes is mainly a bookkeeping problem. The 
amounts paid for these services are now quite low and 
can be canceled without a serious strain on the treasury. 
Benefits to the consumer will accrue only if the quantity 
and quality of the services provided arc improved. Also, 
the provision of free services does not equalize incomes 
unless equal access to the services is provided. In the 
case of housing, for example, the allocation of scarce 
apartment space will certainly continue to widen income 
differentials by providing larger, more desirable apart- 



Premier Khrushchev addressing the 22nd Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. 




-• -"Ai>« 






illustrations: embassy OF THE USSR 




An open hearth furnace being charged with pig- 
iron at the iron and steel mill in Nizhni Tagil. 



ments to those in high-priority, high-income positions. 
Furthermore, the provision of a larger proportion of free 
services will reduce consumer choice. Consumer welfare 
cannot, therefore, be considered the central aim of these 
measures. They are aimed, rather, at satisfying communist 
dogma and at making the provision of consumers goods 
more amenable to the planning process. 

Is there any comfort to be found in the prospect that 
the new party program is not likely to be fulfilled? Our 
previous discussion indicates that despite probable failure 
to fulfill certain sectors of the plan, Soviet production will 
continue to grow at a very rapid rate. The full implication 
of this can be seen from a few figures. If the Soviets main- 
tain an annual growth rate of between 6 and 7 percent 
for the next two decades, which is quite possible, and if 
the United States continues to grow at only a little more 
than 3 percent, the Soviets will overtake us shortly before 
Orwell's prophetic year of 1984. Khrushchev's awareness 
of this arithmetic and of its political implication is shown 
by his own words: 



20 



THE TIME IS APPROACHING WHEN, IN ITS 
SHARE OF WORLD PRODUCTION, SOCIALISM 
WILL TAKE FIRST PLACE. . . . THE VICTORY 
OF THE U.S.S.R. IN ECONOMIC COMPETI- 
TION WITH THE UNITED STATES, THE VIC- 
TORY OF THE WHOLE SOCIALIST SYSTEM 
OVER THE CAPITALIST SYSTEM, WILL BE 
THE GREATEST TURNING POINT IN HIS- 
TORY. THEN EVEN THE GREATEST SKEPT- 
ICS .. . WILL MAKE THEIR CHOICE IN 
FAVOR OF SOCIALISM. 

(Pravda, October 18, 1961). 

As we have seen, such a statement cannot be lightly dis- 
missed. It calls for a vigorous response from us and for 
a response while a margin of safety remains. 

AN EFFECTIVE RESPONSE TO THE SOVIET CHAL- 
lenge must, of course, come on many levels. 
However, only a brief outline of a positive eco- 
nomic program can be presented here. As an 
initial step, full employment should be restored through 
a more vigorous application of existing fiscal and mone- 
tary measures and a broader attack on structural unem- 
ployment. Achieving full employment should increase out- 
put by as much as seven or eight percent, but further 
increases require raising the long-term growth rate, a task 
involving formidable difficulties. Raising the long-term 
growth rate will require increased investment in plant and 
equipment, in science and technology, and in the develop- 
ment of individual's knowledge and skills. 

The goal of increased investment in the private sector 
is not easily achieved in a free economy where the market 
determines priorities. But the establishment of a set of 
national economic goals should raise the sights of business- 
men and encourage a reinforcing consistency in private 
investment plans. Sustained full employment should also 
encourage a higher, more stable level of private invest- 
ment. To increase investment in human capital we need 
more support for all levels of our educational system. 
Similarly, the more rapid development of science and tech- 
nology calls for more public support. 

A higher level of investment in these growth-contributing 
areas can be achieved only at the expense of the share of 
consumption in our national income. This means that the 
public must give up some luxuries initially to gain a better 
chance for our system's survival in the long run. Raising 
our growth rate by only a little more than one percent 
per annum would postpone for many years the date when 
the Soviets catch up. This would provide time for the 
ameliorative forces working toward a more humane and 
less doctrinaire Soviet society to grow in strength and 
influence. Also in the long run, the devisive forces develop- 
ing within the Communist Bloc should tend to weaken the 
aggressive thrust of world communism. We must, there- 
fore, take the necessary steps to gain time for these forces 
to have an effect. 

Let us hope that with better understanding of our 
adversary's capabilities, the American public and its rep- 
resentatives will awaken in time to the necessity for a 
vigorous response to the economic challenge of Khrush- 
chev's 20-year plan. 

the Maryland Magazine 



< 









Arts and Sciences 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16. 



New Appointments 

Dr. George Anastos, Acting Head of 
the University of Maryland Department 
of Zoology, has been appointed perma- 
nent Chairman of the University Depart- 
ment. 

At the same time, two appointments 
were made to the Department of 
Physics faculty. 

Dr. Gart Westerhout was named 
Professor of Astronomy, and Dr. Wil- 
liam Erickson was appointed Associate 
Professor of Astronomy. 

Dr. Anastos came to the University 
from Miami University in 1951. He 
holds a B.S. degree, with distinction, 
from Akron University, and A.M. and 
Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. 
And in addition to his academic affilia- 
tions, he is a consultant for the Depart- 
ment of Defense and The National 
Science Foundation. 

Dr. Westerhout, a native of The 
Hague (Netherlands), holds degrees in 
mathematics, physics and astronomy 
from the University of Leiden. Since 
1960 he has served as Chief Scientific 
Officer at the Leiden University Ob- 
servatory. He is a member of the Dutch 
Astronomical Society, International As- 
tronomical Union and Astronomical So- 
ciety of the Pacific. 

Dr. Erickson, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota where he received 
a B.A. degree in mathematics and M.A. 
and Ph.D. degrees in physics, has served 
as the Senior Staff Scientist at the Con- 
vair Scientific Research Laboratory since 
1959. He is a member of the American 
Astronomical Society. International Sci- 
entific Radio Union, American Geo- 
physical Union and the Astronomical 
Society of the Pacific. 

Peter Hauk Awarded Postdoctoral 
Fellowship 

Peter Hauk, '58, has been awarded an 
American Chemical Society Petroleum 
Research Fund Postdoctoral Fellowship 
for the academic year 1962-1963. 

Mr. Hauk is now a resident of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. He received his 
Bachelor of Science degree from the 
University in chemistry, and in 1961 he 
was awarded the Master's degree in 
chemistry from the Carnegie Institute 
of Technology and expects to receive 
the Ph.D. from the same institution in 
August 1962. 

He will pursue his postdoctoral fel- 
lowship at the California Institute of 
Technology. His field is theoretical phys- 
ical chemistry, and the area in which 
he wishes to carry on his research is 
molecular spectroscopy. 



Recent Talks by Languagi 
Pro] i ssors 

Various members of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Department have been lecturing 
ihis spring. Dr. Douglas W. Alden, Head 
of the Department, addressed the Mary- 
land Chapter ol the A.A.U.P. on April 
12. His subject was the new Foreign 
language Program. Dr. Leonora Cohen 
Rosenfield gave a talk March 2 ( ) for the 
Philosophy Club on "Mysticism and Ra- 
tionalism in Morris R. (ohen." 

Dr. Graciela P. Nemes made an ad- 
dress on March 26 before the Spanish 
Club of Mary Washington College in 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, "facts and 
Fiction in the works of Juan Ramon 
Jimenez" was her topic. She also deliv- 
ered a series of lectures on "Life and 
Works of Juan Ramon Jimenez" for 
students of contemporary Spanish lit- 
erature at Trinity College, on April 5. 
9 and 12. 

On June 13. Dr. W. R. Quynn will 
speak to the Club de Liaison Franco- 
Americain of Washington on the sub- 
ject of life in a Maryland town in the 
eighteenth century. 

Latest French Publication 

Dr. Jean Alter of the Foreign Language 
Department contributed two book re- 
views for the April issue of The French 
Review on recent fiction in France, 
Rogier Bordier's Les Bles, and Henri 
Thomas, he Promontoire. 

Book and Author Luncheon 

Dr. W. R. Quynn of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Department and his wife, Dr. 
Dorothy Quynn, were among the guests 
of honor at the Book and Author Lunch- 
eon given by the Friends of the C. Burr 
Artz Library of Frederick, Maryland, 
on April 7. The Quynns were honored 
for their work in Maryland history. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Prof. James H. Reicl 



Mrs. Johnson Now at Work on 
Third Book 

Mrs. Elizabeth Harrover Johnson, '40, 
of Princeton, New Jersey, has finished 
her second book published by Ives 
Washburn, Inc. of New York. It is 
called Almost Cousins and is recom- 
mended reading for boys and girls of the 
8-12 age group. 

Mrs. Johnson's first book, The Mys- 
terious Trunk, was published over a year 



ago and continues to be a favorite across 
the country in libraries and book stores, 
She is now at work on hei third book 
Ihis book is concerned with horses 
which is a familiar subject to Mrs 
Johnson .is she and her children train 
horses on theii farm and show them in 
competition, 

She was bom m Manassas, Virginia 
and met her husband, David lohn- 
son, Agr. '41. at the University. Mi 
Johnson is President ol Princeton P< 

chrome Press. 

Mrs. Johnson is President ol the 
Princeton Community Homemaker S 
vice and was one ol its organizers. She 

also serves as a volunteer at the Law- 

renceville Community Library. She is 

the mother ol three children. 

Personal Notes 

1st Lt. John D. Jackson, '58, completed 

the eight-week officer orientation course 
at The Infantry School, Fort Benning. 
Georgia, March 6. 

David J. Kelly. '53, has been appoint- 
ed News Director of KDKA Radio. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Frank E. Johnson, Jr., '58, has taken 
a job with the Department of Health. 
Education, and Welfare, as a Manage- 
ment Analyst. 

1st Lt. Richard S. Watt. '60, received 
the United States Air Force Commenda- 
tion Medal. The award was given in 
recognition of his meritorious service 
as Administrative Officer at Mc( toj 
A.F.B., Florida. 

Roy Schiller, '58. was working on 
his Master's degree in finance at CCNY 
before he was recalled to active duty 
by the Army and is now serving with 
the 92nd Field Hospital, Fort Gordon. 
Georgia. 

David Reznick. '59. and Stuart M. 
Fedder, '59, who are partners in the 
CPA firm of Chakin, Fedder and Rez- 
nick of Washington, D. C, were recalled 
to active duty by the Army and are sta- 
tioned at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. 

Soldier of the Year 

Basilio M. Liacuris, '60, was named 
"Soldier of the Year" of the 2nd Battle 
Group, 21st Infantry, at Schoficld Bar- 
racks, Hawaii, and promoted to Special- 
ist Fourth Class. 

Mr. Liacuris is a member of Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. Sigma Delta Chi. and 
American Public Relations Association. 
He was also co-captain of the Soccer 
team, selected Ail-American and All- 
South team in Soccer. 

Scholarships Awarded Journ.m ism 
Students 

Scholarships totaling $1,950 have been 
awarded to five University of Maryland 
journalism students. 

(Continued on next page) 



I 



May-June, 1962 



21 



The scholarships arc awarded annu- 
ilh on the basis of student dedication, 
scholarship and need. 

John W. Prial of College Park, Mary- 
land, received the $500 Baltimore Sun- 
papers scholarship. A Navy veteran who 
served as managing editor of the 
Diamondback student newspaper, Prial 
is married and has a 4-month-old son. 

Jay F. Morris of Hyattsville, Mary- 
land, was awarded the $500 Colortone 
(Press) Graphic Arts and Publication 
scholarship. He has served as reporter 
and associate editor on the Diamond- 
buck. He also is married. 

Jerry M. Bayne, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Melvin J. Bayne of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, received a $375 Baltimore News- 
Post scholarship. He is Assistant Sports 
Editor of the Diamondback. 

Russell Potts, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. R. Potts of Winchester, Virginia, was 
also awarded a $375 Baltimore News- 
Post scholarship. Potts, who is Thurs- 
day Managing Editor of the Diamond- 
back, is Vice President of Phi Delta 
Theta fraternity. 

Monica Matzek, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Matzek of Silver Spring, 
Maryland, received the $200 Mont- 
gomery County Press Association schol- 
arship. She has filled several positions 
on the Diamondback and is a member 
of Kappa Alpha Mu, photojournalism 
honorary. 

Articles Published 

An article entitled "Political Theory and 
Public Administration — A Growing In- 
terdependence?" by Conley H. Dillon, 
Professor of Government and Politics, 
has just been published in Public Ad- 
ministration in an Era of Change. This 
article was the result of the work of 
Dr. Dillon as a reporter of a panel dis- 
cussion at the 1961 Conference of the 
American Society of Public Administra- 
tion. 

Mr. James H. Wolfe, Instructor in 
the Department of Government and 
Politics, has published an article on 
"Antarctic Territorial Claims: A Prog- 
nosis" in Foreign Affairs Reporter, 
April, 1961. 



1962-1963 Congressional Fellowship 
Program 

Dr. Elmer Plischke, Head of the De- 
partment of Government and Politics, 
has completed an important assignment 
as Chairman of the Advisory Commit- 
tee for the 1962-1963 Congressional 
Fellowship Program with the selection 
of the winners of the National Competi- 
tion for these posts. 

The American Political Science Asso- 
ciation in cooperation with the U. S. 
Congress has sponsored this program 
since 1953. It gives promising teachers 
and reporters in the field of American 
government a unique opportunity to 
participate actively in the work of Con- 
gress and thereby broaden their back- 
ground of contemporary political affairs. 
The announcement of the winners of the 
program was made this month and in- 
cluded eight political scientists, eight 
journalists and one social psychologist. 
This group will come to Washington 
next November for ten months to work 
as staff assistants in congressional and 
senatorial offices, engage in personal 
and group research and meet with na- 
tional political figures. Each winner will 
receive $4,500.00 plus traveling ex- 
penses. This program is financed by a 
grant from the Ford Foundation and 
other funds. The distinguished members 
of the Advisory Committee chaired by 
Dr. Plischke are as follows: 

John Brademas, U. S. House of Repre- 
sentatives (Democrat, Indiana) 

Douglas Cater, The Reporter Magazine 

Orville L. Freeman, Secretary of Agri- 
culture 

Richard Kirkpatrick, The Cincinnati In- 
quirer 

John Kyi, U. S. House of Representa- 
tives (Republican, Iowa) 

Eugene McCarthy, U. S. Senate (Demo- 
crat, Minnesota) 

Joseph McCaffrey, American Broadcast- 
ing Company (radio and television 
commentator) 

Elmer Plischke, chairman, Department 
of Government and Politics, Univer- 
sity of Maryland 

Leverett Saltonstall, U. S. Senate (Re- 
publican, Massachusetts) 

Richard Scammon, Director of the Cen- 
sus 



School of 

DENTISTRY 



Kyrle W. Preis, D.D.S. 



The Fourth Triennial 

The Fourth Triennial Meeting of the 
Alumni Association was held in Balti- 
more this past March. Because of a 
common misunderstanding which arises 
when the word "triennial" is used, an 
explanation is in order. The Dental 
Alumni Association, one of the largest 
and most active in the University, holds 
its annual meeting during June Week; 
but in recognition of the founding dates 
of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, the first dental school in the 
world (March 6, 1840), every three 
years a special meeting, which incor- 
porates scientific sessions and social 
activities, is arranged. 

The facilities of the new Student 
Union Building directly across Lombard 
Street from the Dental School were put 
to good advantage during this latest 
meeting which began with greetings 
from Dean Myron Aisenberg. The fol- 
lowing alumni gave scientific presenta- 
tions: Irving Newman '32, David Scott 
M3, Sidney Liberman '38, Irving Abram- 
son '22, Eugene Hinds '52, Conrad Fer- 
lita '59, Jose Diaz '50, Nicholas Giu- 
ditta '38, Anthony Klein '58, Ernest 
Nuttall '31, Philip Smith '59, and Rob- 
ert Swinehart '37. Dr. Abramson, co- 
chairman of the Triennial Meeting, was 
responsible for the scientific arrange- 
ments. 

The highlight of the social activities 
was the Dinner Dance at the Belvedere 
Hotel on Saturday evening. Dr. Kath- 
arine Toomey, retired administrative 
assistant at the Dental School, and Dr. 
J. Stephenson Hopkins of Bel Air, Mary- 
land, were the honored guests. 

Greetings were extended by Mrs. 
John L. Whitehurst, Board of Regents, 
University of Maryland; Dean Myron 
S. Aisenberg, Faculty, Dental School. 
University of Maryland; Mr. David L. 
Brigham, Director of Alumni Relations, 
University of Maryland. 



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the Maryland Magazine 




PRESENTATION OF PLAQUE marking site of the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. Left to right: Mr. McCormick, Dean Aisenberg, Mr. Stoekbridge, 
Professor Foley and Dr. Preis. 



The President of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, Joseph P. Cappuccio '46, who 
conducted the ceremonies, presented the 
certificates to the following members 
of the class of 1912 on their golden 
anniversary: William Lurty Baugher, 
Harrisonburg, Virginia; J. Fernandez 
Carballo, San Juan, Puerto Rico; Robert 
Lee Hicks, Florence, South Carolina; 
Thomas Halliday Hoffman, York, Penn- 
sylvania; Arthur Lankford, Baltimore, 
Maryland; Davitt M. Moroney, Collins- 
ville, Connecticut; Harry D. Rhein, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Carl Edward 
Schlieder, Baltimore, Maryland; Robert 
Lamont Strickland, Buffalo, New York, 
George Patterson, Asheville, North Car- 
olina. 

The Chairmen of the other class re- 
unions which held their celebration 
during the alumni banquet were: A. P. 
Scarborough '07, Arthur Lankford and 
C. Edward Schlieder '12, E. B. Jackson 
and Oscar E. Culler '17, Ethelbert Lov- 
ette and Daniel E. Shehan '22, Brice M. 
Dorsey '27, Wilbur D. Burton, Jr. and 
John C. Heck '37, Irving Katz '42, and 
E. G. Vandenbosche '47. 

In presenting Dr. Hopkins, George 
Anderson '19 said: "James Stephenson 
Hopkins graduated Summa Cum Laude, 
1905, from the Dental Department of 
the University of Maryland. Since then 
his professional abilities have been 
equally superior and they have been 
recognized by a public confidence and 
esteem, the like of which all of us 
would be fortunate to possess. His pro- 
fession recognized the quality of the 
man by electing him President of the 
State Dental Association. 

"Dr. Hopkins was not satisfied to rest 
on his laurels, for a short while later 
he helped organize the Harford-Cecil 
Dental Society, a component of the 
State Association. Dr. Hopkins early 
recognized that the keystone of a pro- 
fession's progress is its educational 
standards and opportunities. Therefore, 
when invited to become a member of 
the Dental Educational Council of 
America he accepted this important 



responsibility on the national level and 
served with distinction. On the local 
level he was busy for 20 years as a 
member of the State Board of Dental 
Examiners." 

Dean Emeritus J. Ben Robinson, who 
presented Dr. Katharine Toomey, made 
the following remarks: 

"Our guest of honor served the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, through its School 
of Dentistry, for a period of 44 years — 
longer than any other person ever con- 
nected with it, excepting its eminent 
former Dean, Dr. F. J. S. Gorgas. 

"Beginning in 1924 there was a job 
that had to be done in order that dental 
education at Maryland might survive. 
The task was that of reorganizing and 
rebuilding the most revered institution 
in dentistry, the first dental school in the 
world, the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. 

"Our guest of honor had by this time 
matured in her position, had gained val- 
uable experience in the general admin- 
istration of the affairs of a school of 
dentistry, had acquired a sound under- 
standing of the meaning of dental edu- 
cation, and had developed an almost 
fanatical devotion to the cause of which 
she had become a part. 

"In fact, as I saw it then and as it 
has since proved out, she had come to 
be as nearly indispensable in the difficult 
situation that existed, as one could be." 

The Alumni Association, in apprecia- 
tion of Dr. Toomey's long and faithful 
service, bestowed upon her substantial 
gifts including a specially made gold 
bracelet with individual charms depict- 
ing the outstanding events in her life. 
Dr. Hopkins received a replica of the 
"Distinguished Alumnus Plaque" which 
is placed in "Deans Hall" at the Dental 
School. 

Governor Millard Tawes sent to each 
honored guest a magnificently inscribed 
"Certificate of Distinguished Citizen- 
ship." The banquet was a great success 
from almost every viewpoint. More than 

(Continued on next page) 



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May-June, 1962 



23 



I alumni and friends attended and it 
as a happy celebration. 

The opulence of the Belvedere's main 
ballroom, the formal attire, the prevail- 
ing air of respectful yet joyous cordiality 
made many of us feel we were witness- 
ing the passing of an era. 



Historical Plaque 

On April 9 Jason W. Stockbridge, Pres- 
ident of the Central Savings Bank, pre- 
sented a plaque which marked the orig- 
inal site of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery (east side of Hopkins 
Place) to Charles P. McCormick, Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents, Univer- 
sity of Maryland. Members of the group 
at the presentation were: Charles P. 
McCormick; Dean Myron S. Aisenberg; 
Jason W. Stockbridge; Gardner P. H. 
Foley, Professor of Dental History at 
the Dental School; and Dr. Kyrle W. 
Preis, Editor of the Alumni publication 
Alma Mater. 

The Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, founded in 1840, was the first 
dental college in the world. For many 
years this plaque was displayed on the 
wall of the Hopkins Place branch of the 
Central Savings Bank at 7-11 Hopkins 
Place. This building is soon to be razed 
to make way for new buildings in the 
Charles Center. At the present time the 
plaque is in the museum of the Dental 
School. When the new building erected 
at Hopkins Place is completed, the 
plaque will be appropriately relocated. 



200 Years Ago 



Jacques E. Brun, '52, was our official 
European representative at the unveiling 
of Pierre Fauchard's bust in the garden 
of the "Chateau de Grand Mesuil," 
Fauchard's country home near Paris, 
France. 



College of 

EDUCATION 

Mary J. A halt 



News of Alumni 

Captain Myrdon T. Neumann, B.S. 
1949, and member of Sigma Phi Epsi- 
lon Fraternity, has assumed command 
of Headquarters Squadron, 38th Tac- 
tical Missile Wing at Sembach A.B., 
Germany. Captain Neumann served as 
administrative chief at Sembach Air 
Base prior to this appointment as com- 
mander. He will continue his adminis- 
trative duties along with his command 
responsibilities. 

Charles M. Carlson, II, 1961 Educa- 
tion, who entered United States Air 
Force pilot training at Webb A.F.B., 
Texas, will fly T-37 and T-33 jets during 
the year-long flying training course. He 
also will receive special academic and 
military training and will be awarded 



the silver wings of a pilot upon gradua- 
tion. 

Program Participation 

Dr. Henry Mendeloff, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Education and Foreign Lan- 
guages, presented "An Introduction to 
Applied Linguistics: Theory and Prac- 
tice" to an in-service meeting for foreign 
language teachers of Prince George's 
County. Also, "The When and How of 
the Reading and Writing Skills in FLES" 
was presented for FLES teachers in 
Prince George's County at another 
meeting. 

Dr. Orval L. Ulry, Professor of Edu- 
cation and Director of Summer School, 
presented "Developments in Teaching" 
to members of the PTSA at Glenelg 
High School. 

Dr. Donald Maley, Professor and 
Head of the Industrial Education De- 
partment, recently participated on the 
Voice of America. Dr. Maley dis- 
cussed the President's Conference on 
Occupational Safety. He dealt with such 
topics as progress in industrial safety 
over the years; the nature of hazards 
in certain industries; the significance of 
the President's Conference; and the 
background and development of the 
Conference. 

Dr. John Mayor, Professor of Edu- 
cation and Mathematics and Director 
of University of Maryland Mathematics 
Project, participated in a panel discus- 
sion on "New Direction in Science Edu- 
cation" along with Dr. Zacharias of the 
Department of Physics, MIT; Dr. Mo- 



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24 



the Maryland Magazine 



merit of Goucher; and Dr. Ohourn in 
the U. S. Office of Education, at the 

35th Annual Meeting on the National 
Association for Research in Science 
Teaching in D. C. which was held joint- 
ly with the Council of Elementary Sci- 
ence International. The general topic for 
the meeting was "The Improvement of 
Research in Science Teaching." 



Publications 

Dr. J. Paul Anderson, Assistant Profes- 
sor, along with Ned A. Flanders and 
Edmund J. Amidon, authored "Measur- 
ing Dependence Proneness in the Class- 
room" which was published in the quar- 
terly journal. Volume 2 1 , No. 3 of 
Educational and Psychological Measure- 
ment, pp. 575-587. 

Nurse in Home Training Programs 
for the Retarded Child by Laura Ditt- 
mann has been released by the U. S. 
Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare. Miss Dittmann is Research 
Assistant in Higher Education in the 
College of Education and Specialist in 
Growth and Development of Handi- 
capped Children, Division of Health 
Services in the U. S. Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 

Dr. James A. van Zwoll, Professor of 
Education, conducted a survey of twenty 
universities as a basis for "Secretarial 
Service: What Kind, How Much?" 
which appears in Volume 32, Number 
2, February 1962 of College and Uni- 
versity Business. 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of 
the College of Education, has released 
the second, completely revised edition 
of his book. Principles and Practices of 
Secondary Education. Dr. William T. 
Gruhn from the University of Connec- 
ticut is co-author. Some of the newer 
trends in secondary education teaching 
— programs for the academically tal- 
ented, team teaching and the use of new 
media such as television and language 
laboratories for instruction — are dis- 
cussed. 



Maley Presides Over A.C.I.A.T.E. 
Conference 

Dr. Donald Maley recently presided 
over the national convention of the 
American Council on Industrial Arts 
Teacher Education. Dr. Maley has been 
the president of the Council for the past 
two years. The meetings were held in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The theme of 
the conference was "The Pursuit of Ex- 
cellence in Industrial Arts Teaching." 

Dr. William F. Tierney has been re- 
elected Executive Secretary of the 
American Council on Industrial Arts 
Teacher Education. 

(Continued on next page) 




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College of 

ENGINEERING 



R. M. Ginnings 




Miss Evelyn Harrison 

Miss Evelyn Harrison, '32, was one of six 
Government career women to receive 
the second annual Federal Woman's 
Award. She was chosen for her out- 
standing competence demonstrated by 
her role in the formulation and develop- 
ment of Government-wide personnel 
policies. 

Miss Harrison is the University's first 
woman to graduate from the Engineer- 
ing College. She has done graduate work 
at George Washington University and 
American University in psychology, 
psychometrics, and public administra- 
tion. She is a native of the District of 
Columbia. 

Miss Harrison is known to high offi- 
cials throughout the Government for her 
ability in resolving interagency prob- 
lems of personnel policy and practice 
under the Federal merit system. 



Alumni Notes 

C. Vinton Koons, CE '29, a Washing- 
ton, D. C, attorney, has been elected 
President of the District of Columbia 
Baptist Convention. 

Mr. Koons is a member of Metro- 
politan Baptist Church and succeeds 
Dr. Frank K. Brasington, pastor of 
Silver Spring Baptist Church, as presi- 
dent. 

He is a native of Washington and, 
after leaving Maryland, graduated from 
Georgetown University Law School in 
1934 and received his Doctor of Juris- 
prudence from Georgetown in 1935. 
As well as practicing law in Washing- 
ton, D. C, he serves as an Adjunct 
Professor at Georgetown Law School. 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



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Robert A. Hitch. '29. was transferred 
from Picatinny Arsenal, where he was 
Chief of Purchasing office and principal 
contracting officer, to the Pentagon as 
Chief, Contract Administration, Office 
of Deputy Chief of Staff for 1 ogistics, 
Department oi the Vrmy. 

Dudley D. Taylor, Ml '51, MSM1 
'54, has, with Wayne D. Wilson, devel- 
oped at NOI. a velocimeter, a small 
device to determine the velocity ol 
sound in sea water. It is a li\c-inch 
long stainless steel cylindrical housing 
equipped with a sound transmitting 
crystal on one end and a receiving 
crystal on the other. The velocity ol a 
sound pulse sent through a liquid sam- 
ple contained in the cylindrical housing 
is determined by recording the length 
of time in which the pulse traverses the 
known distance between the crystals. 

They feel that it has significant appli- 
cation for quality control in the produc- 
tion of numerous commercial products 
ranging from gasoline to milk; for ex- 
ample, in Mr. Wilson's words, "the 
petroleum industry could use it to iden- 
tify and evaluate for purity the products 
from distillation and cracking pro- 
cesses." 

Robert Kinney, ME '40, has been 
appointed manager of Sales and Con- 
tracts, Missile and Space Vehicles De- 
partment of the General Electric Com- 
pany at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Kinney, also, is author and composer 
of the University's Alma Mater. 

Richard Proctor. ME '54, Ag. '53, is 
now with Sanders Associates. Inc.. 
Nashua, New Hampshire, as Manufac- 
turing Engineer. Before joining Sanders. 
Mr. Proctor was employed by West- 
inghouse Electric Corporation. 

E. W. Inglis, ME '43. has left Wash- 
ington to accept the position of cost 
and distribution manager in the Opera- 
tions Department of Humble Oil and 
Refining Company's Eastern Esso Re- 
gion in New York. Mr. Inglis joined 
Esso in 1946; in 1956 he was named 
assistant district manager in Washing- 
ton, D. C, and became district manager 
in February. 1960. 

Mr. Robert S. Caruthers, '26, is Direc- 
tor of Product Development for Inter- 
national Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany, 320 Park Avenue, New York 22, 
New York. 

I. M. Reid, Ch.E. '49, has most re- 
cently been supervising research in the 
fields of utility gas distribution and utili- 
zation for the Institute of Gas Technol- 
ogy, which is affiliated with Illinois In- 
stitute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois. 
Mr. Reid joined IGT in 1949 after 
graduation and has done pilot plant work 
studies in catalytic reforming of hydro- 
carbons and production of hydrogen, 
olefins, aromatics and pitches from pe- 
troleum oils and light tars. 

Colonel Charles C. Holbrook has been 
designated a Logistician in the U. S. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Army. Colonel Holbrook is serving at 
the Headquarters of Allied Forces 
Southern Europe in Naples, Italy. 

Earl Angulo, ME '51, spoke on the 
Explorer X at the February meeting of 
the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers in Washington, D. C. Mr. 
Angulo is Project Engineer, Payload 
Systems Branch, Spacecraft Technology 
Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, 
Greenbelt, Maryland. 

George O. Weber, ME '33, U. S. 
Army Reserve Colonel, completed the 
one-week senior officer advanced opera- 
tions course at The Command and Gen- 
eral Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas. The course is planned specific- 
ally for general officers, colonels, and 
lieutenant colonels and is designed to 
provide training in doctrine and tech- 
niques for the employment of a defense 
against special weapons. 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Dean Selma Lippeatt 



Alumni Notes 

Evelyn Miller, '33, has assumed duties 
as the new President of the Maryland 
Home Economics Association. 

Gladys Oberlin, '31, is a Methodist 
Missionary in Brazil, doing home eco- 
nomics and nutrition work. 

Ethel Jeanne Gardner, '57, is now a 
member of the Peace Corps, working 
as a home economist in Peru. 

Astrid Molander of Sweden, a mas- 
ter's degree alumnus, '56, received a 
Ph.D. degree in food and nutrition at 
Iowa State University in February. 



Faculty Activities 

Dean Selma F. Lippeatt is serving as 
the home economics representative for 
a state-wide survey of vocational edu- 
cation in South Carolina. 

Pela Braucher presented a scientific 
paper on research on protein metabo- 
lism at the annual conference of the 
Federation of American Societies for 
Experimental Biology in Atlantic City. 

Selma F. Lippeatt was speaker for the 
General Session of the annual conven- 
tion of the Maryland Home Economics 
Association on the topic, "International 
Dimensions of Home Economics." 

The Maryland Dietetics Association 
held its annual spring convention on the 
University of Maryland campus. Dr. 
Helen I. Brown of the food and nutri- 
tion staff and Miss Edith Jones, N.I.H., 
were featured speakers. Institution man- 
agement majors prepared and served 
luncheon for the group. 

Dr. Ruth Dales of Florida State Uni- 
versity will be the visiting professor 



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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



lor the summer offering of the Depart- 
ment of Family Life and Management. 

The Department of Textiles and 
Clothing, in cooperation with the Na- 
tional Institute of Drycleaning, will be 
offering a special workshop this summer 
on '"Fabric Selection and Performance 
in Drycleaning." 

The American Home Economics As- 
sociation has selected the College ol 
Home Economics as the institution for 
an international scholarship awarded to 
Miss Mihoko Matsuyama of Japan for 
1962-63. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Alumni Announcement 

Doctor Frank K. Morris, President o( 
the Medical Alumni Association, has 
announced the Alumni Day festivities 
planned for Thursday, June 7. 

Registration will begin in Davidge 
Hall at 9:00 A.M. This will be followed 
by the scientific session and annual 
business meeting of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. This year the presentation of 
the Honor Award and Alumni Gold 
Key will go to Dr. Arturo R. Casilli, 
who will receive his honor from the 
President of the Medical Alumni Asso- 
ciation, Dr. Frank K. Morris. Follow- 
ing the Honor Award ceremonies, 
luncheon will be served in the Student 
Union Building. The luncheon is free 
to all who register, but all must have 
an admission ticket. 

In the afternoon there will be class 
reunions (some have been scheduled 
for the preceding day). Evening festivi- 
ties will begin at 7:00 P.M. with the 
annual Alumni Banquet. 

Dr. Austin H. Wood is Chairman of 
the Honor Award Committee, assisted 
by Drs. J. Morris Reese and S. Edwin 
Muller. 

Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks is Chair- 
man of the Nominating Committee. 

Dr. Isadore Kaplan will head the 
Reception Committee, and Dr. Gibson 
J. Wells will chair the Student Loan 
Committee. 

Class Captains for individual class 
reunions have been appointed. These 
include the following: 

50th Reunion, Class of 1912, Dr. 
Albert E. Goldstein. 

45th Reunion, Class of 1917, Dr. 
Louis A. Krause. 

40th Reunion, Class of 1922, Dr. 
John O'Connor. 

35th Reunion, Class of 1927, Dr. T. 
Nelson Carey. 

30th Reunion, Class of 1932, Dr. 
John E. Savage. 

(Continued on next page) 




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25th Reunion. Class of 1937, Dr. J. 
B. E. King Seegar. 

20th Reunion. Class of 1942, Dr. 
John R. Davis, Jr. 

15th Reunion, Class of 1947, Dr. 
Arlie R. Mansberger. 

1 0th Reunion, Class of 1952, Dr. 
John O. Sharrett. 

5th Reunion, Class of 1957, Dr. John 
V. Conway. 



Alumni Association Plans Reunion 
at AMA Meeting in Chicago 

Medical Alumni and their wives are 
urged to attend a cocktail party spon- 
sored by the Medical Alumni Associa- 
tion on the occasion of the American 
Medical Association meeting in Chicago 
on June 24 to June 28. The cocktail 
party will be held at the Sheraton-Black- 
slone Hotel from 5 to 6 P.M. on Tues- 
day, June 26. Registration for the affair 
can be made at the reception desk at the 
AMA convention. 



Class Notes 

Several years ago, your reporter visited 
Houston, Texas, the home of John J. 
Bunting, '38, who practices internal 
medicine in that city. John, the owner 
of the Lazy-B Ranch near Richmond, 
Texas, often travels to and from his 
office by helicopter, a 15-minute flight. 

Jack serves as lecturer in medicine 
at the University of Texas Graduate 
School of Medicine, and is a Fellow of 
the American College of Chest Physi- 
cians. He also serves as Associate Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Medicine at the Bay- 
lor University College of Medicine, and 
is active on the staffs of the Memorial, 
the Hermann, the Methodist, the St. 
Luke's, and the Jefferson Davis Hospi- 
tal, all in Houston. 

Aside from his interest in horses, Jack 
has found time to serve as co-editor of 
the Medical Records and Annals, a local 
scientific publication, and is active as a 
Director of the rapidly growing Central 
National Bank, is a founder of St. 
Martin's Episcopal Church, and has en- 
tertained a number of University men, 
prominent among whom was Ted Wood- 
ward who visited him in 1960. 

Raymond C. V. Robinson has been 
named Councillor to the Southern Med- 
ical Association. Drs. F. A. Holden and 
Harry M. Robinson, Sr., will serve as 
Associate Councillors. 

Raymond V. Rangle has been named 
chairman of Baltimore's Equal Employ- 
ment Opportunity Commission. 

Frank J." Ayd, Jr., '45, has recently 
returned from a European lecture tour. 
The principal lecture given by Dr. Ayd 
was the Dr. Thomas Dooley Memorial 
Lecture at the University of Rome, 
with other lectures being given at the 
Salvator Mundi Hospital, the North 



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30 



the Maryland Magazine 



American College, and the College 
Bellarmino, also in Rome. Dr. Ayd also 
spoke in the Beda College in Rome, 
Collegio Di Santa Croce in Rome, and 
at the University of Paris. 

Leonard Bachman, '46, has been re- 
cently promoted to the rank of Asso- 
ciate Professor of Anesthesiology in the 
University of Pennsylvania School of 
Medicine. Dr. Bachman is Director of 
the Division of Anesthesiology at the 
Children's Hospital in Philadelphia. 

Pomeroy Nichols, '46, of Augusta. 
Ga., has been nominated Chairman of 
the Staff of the University Hospital in 
Augusta for the year 1961-62. 

James S. O'Hare, '46, has relocated 
his practice and is now associated with 
the Travis Clinic in Jacksonville, Tex. 

A former resident at the Lutheran 
Hospital of Maryland and active on the 
staff of the Mercy Hospital in Baltimore 
before moving to Texas, Dr. O'Hare is 
continuing his specialization of general 
and vascular surgery. 

James E. Anthony, Jr., '47, is cur- 
rently active in the practice of general 
surgery with offices at 558 Medlock Rd., 
Decatur, Ga. 

Howard F. Raskin, '49, is the co- 
author of an article appearing in a recent 
number of CA ( The A merican Cancer 
Society Clinical Bulletin ) relating to car- 
cinoma of the pancreas, biliary tract, 
and liver. 

Dr. Raskin is in the Department of 
Medicine at the University of Chicago 
Clinics and is the author of many im- 
portant studies on the cytopathology of 
the gastrointestinal tract. 

Walter Houck Byerly, '53, has been 
appointed Resident in Anesthesiology 
at the Mayo Clinic Foundation, Roches- 
ter, Minn. 

Leonard H. Flax, '53, is the author 
of a recently published paper relating to 
A New Surgical Drain. 

In an article appearing in the July 
15, 1961 issue of the Journal of the 
American Medical Association, Dr. Flax 
states " — A new radiopaque drain has 
been developed which can be seen in 
the event of its disappearance within a 
surgical wound. This drain is impreg- 
nated with barium sulphate, marked at 
5.0 cm. intervals to determine residual 
portion of the drain remaining. Experi- 
ence with 54 cases are satisfactory with- 
out undesirable side effects. Visualiza- 
tion is excellent at varying depth — ." 

William Dvorine, '55, has announced 
the removal of his office to the Pikes- 
ville Medical Center, 1401 Reisterstown 
Rd., Pikesville, Md. 

Marion Restivo, '57, who is now on 
active duty with the United States Pub- 
lic Health Service, is stationed at Fort 
Wainwright near Fairbanks, Alaska. 

Harry J. Fitch, '58, writes that he 7s 
now engaged in the practice of general 
surgery at 1400 Main St. in Eunice, 
N. M. 

(Continued on next page) 




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School of 

PHARMACY 



Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
Dr. B. Olive Cole 



Annual Alumni Banquet 

The Annual Alumni Banquet will be 
held on June 7, 1962 at The Baltimore 
Union Building, 621 W. Lombard Street. 
At that time the graduates of the School 
of Pharmacy of 1912 will be presented 
with certificates denoting graduation 
fifty years ago, and membership in the 
Alumni Association. The Distinguished 
Alumni of the Association will also be 
honored on that occasion. The gradu- 
ates of 1962, with their ladies or escorts, 
will be the guests of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

The list of honorees are as follows: 
Sidney Joseph Brown, Jacksonville, 
Florida; Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh. 
Elkridge, Maryland; Hermann Dietel, 
Jr., Los Angeles, California; Ethan O. 
Frierson, Belton, South Carolina; Henry 
Felix Hein, San Antonio, Texas; Lee 
Hodges, Greenwood, South Carolina; 
Charles Edwin McCormick, Baltimore. 
Maryland; Frederick Minder, Baltimore, 
Maryland; Mrs. James Phillips, Catons- 
ville, Maryland; Robert Reginald Pierce, 
Morgantown, West Virginia; Lloyd N. 
Richardson, Bel Air, Maryland; Mrs. 
Joaquina Ruiz de Torres, Santurce, 
Puerto Rico; Thomas Stanley Smith, 
Wilmington, Delaware; John Alfred 
Strevig, Baltimore, Maryland; Harold A. 
Swartz; Daniel Andrew Warren, Balti- 
more, Maryland; James J. Wolfe, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 



Pharmacy Graduate of University 

of Maryland to Serve Aboard 

S.S. Hope 

Miss Margaret Sherwood, originally 
from Leetonia, Ohio, who received the 
M.S. degree through work in Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, in 1958, has 
been selected to serve as the pharmacist 
aboard the S.S. Hope on its voyage to 
Peru, as announced by Dr. William S. 
Walsh, President of Project Hope. 

The primary vehicle is the S.S. Hope, 
a floating medical center, which will 
anchor at Salaverry, the port of Trujillo, 
300 miles north of Lima, the site of a 
new medical school at the University of 
Trujillo. The mercy vessel will provide 
a base for teaching and training opera- 
tions, and the establishment of a Hos- 
pital Administration school, a nursing 
school and other inland programs. 

The S.S. Hope, formerly the U. S. 
Navy hospital ship Consolation, is on 
loan from the Government. It contains 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



modern medical equipment, supplies 
and training aids. 

The Hope returned last September 
from its one-year maiden voyage to 
Southeast Asia. Many American person- 
nel remained to continue Hope's teach- 
er-training program in Djakarta. In- 
donesia, and in Saigon, South Viet Nam. 
The S.S. Hope visits only those coun- 
tries to which it has been invited by 
the local medical professions. 

Many persons are interested in this 
privately-sponsored program to share 
our modern medical knowledge and 
skills with newly developed nations. 



College of 

PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION, 
RECREATION 
AND HEALTH 

Miss Mary R. Harrington 

Publications 

Dr. James H. Humphrey, Professor of 
P. E. and Health, Dr. Warren Johnson, 
Professor of Health Department, Mrs. 
Virginia Moore, Supervisor of P. E. in 
Anne Arundel County, coauthors of Ele- 
mentary School Health Education, Col- 
lege Textbook published by Harper & 
Brothers, March 1962. 

Dr. Warren Johnson, Miss Doris 
Terry, Asst. Prof. Health, Miss Jose- 
phine Gaines, former Asst. Professor of 
Health, and Dr. James H. Humphrey, 
coauthors of Health Concepts for Col- 
lege Students, College Textbook pub- 
lished by Ronald Press, March 1962. 

TV and Radio Appearances 

Dr. James H. Humphrey, Professor of 
P. E. and Health, was a guest on the 
"Feminine Forum" Radio Show, WINX, 
March 14. He was interviewed on the 
topic of "Physical Education for Chil- 
dren." 

Clinics, Workshops and Symposia 

Mrs. Betty Crowson, Instructor in P. E. 
Dept., conducted an Apparatus Clinic 
for Prince Georges County High School 
Teachers recently at the request of the 
Prince Georges County Board of Edu- 
cation. 

Miss Martha Haverstick, Assistant 
Professor of P. E., conducted a Move- 
ment Clinic at Howard University in 
February. 

Dr. Burris Husman, Associate Pro- 
fessor of P. E., was the summarizer for 
the Research Section at the recent mcct- 

(Continued on next pai;c) 



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Plumbing & Heating Contractor 

9333 FRASER ST. 
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ing of the College Physical Education 
Association held in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

G. Allen Soger 

Far East Tuition Rise 

Tuition fees in the Far East Division 
will be increased from $10.00 to $12.00 
per semester hour effective September 
1, 1962, it was announced recently. 

Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard, Director of 
the Far East Division, explained that 
costs of administering the program have 
risen steadily through the years and have 
now reached the point where present 
fees no longer cover operational ex- 
penses. 

The present fees have been in effect 
since the Far East Division was estab- 
lished in 1956. 

Dr. Bundgaard also announced that 
the Far East Division is planning im- 
provement and expansion of the pro- 
gram in the coming school year, such 
as increasing the number of full-time 
faculty by some 50 per cent, adding a 
language supervisor to the staff, and 
offering more courses in language, Far 
East history and mathematics to meet 
the needs of military students. 

Alumni Notes 

Major Arthur E. Allen, '57, currently 
assigned to the Air Force ROTC de- 
tachment at Brown University, has 
been promoted to the academic rank of 
Professor of Air Science. 

Lt. Col. Leonard P. Markes, '54, has 
retired from the U. S. Air Force and 
is now living in Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Earl Ingram, '61, has been promoted 
to Lt. Col. U.S.A., in Germany where he 
is assigned to Headquarters, Seventh 
U. S. Army. 

Army Col. Harlan J. Long, '57, re- 
cently completed the senior officer ad- 
vanced operations course at the Army 
Command and General Staff College, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Lt. Col. Clarence R. Glasebrook, '55, 
has been awarded the United States Air 
Force Commendation Medal in recogni- 
tion of his meritorious service as a mem- 
ber of the Air University aerospace 
briefing team at Maxwell Air Force 
Base, Alabama. 

Murray W. Cole, '58, Commander 
of the 29th Munitions Maintenance 
Squadron at Homestead Air Force Base, 
Florida, has been promoted to Lt. Col. 
in the U. S. Air Force. 

William L. Dodge, '57, Assistant Pro- 
le ssor of Air Science at the University 
of Alabama, has been promoted to Lt. 
Col. in the U. S. Air Force. 




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and Operated Cooperative 



BRIGGS 

Construction Co., Inc. 

CUSTOM HOMES 

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BETHESDA. MD. OL 6-4545 



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HOTEL SUPPLY CO. 

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MEATS ■ POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
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To Hotel*. 

Institutions, Ships, 

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227 S. 

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BALTIMORE. MD. 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

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AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones GRanite 4-l!5r,6 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located In the Center of 
the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



34 



the Maryland Magazine 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park. Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

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Oscar S. Anderson, Jr.. '54. a student 
at the Air War College. Maxwell An 
Force Base, Alabama, has been pro- 
moted to Colonel in the U. S. Air Force. 

Army It. Col. Jay I'. Thomas, '50, 
is a recent graduate of (he Armed 
Forces Staff College. Norfolk, Virginia. 
The College is a graduate-level service 
school under the direct supervision ol 
the Joint Chiefs of Stall'. 

Army It. Col. (lark O. Irving. '60. 
has completed the senior officer ad- 
vanced operations course at the Arms 
Command and General Stall College, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Roman J. Lutz, '58, received the 
Master of Arts degree from the State 
University of Iowa in February. 

Howard R. Haudrau, '60. armament 
and electronics maintenance officer at 
Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Da- 
kota, has been promoted to l.t. Col. 
in the U. S. Air Force. 

Leslie A. Smith, '57, a student in the 
Air University War College at Maxwell 
Air Force Base, Alabama, has been pro- 
moted to Colonel in the U. S. Air Force. 



COMPLETED 
CAREERS 

1st Lt. James T. McKenzie 

First Lt. James T. McKenzie, BPA '56, 
was killed in the crash of a B-58 jet 
bomber at Fort Worth, Texas, March 5. 

Lt. McKenzie was defense systems 
operator on the plane. He went on 
active duty in 1956. He had just trans- 
ferred to Fort Worth after completing 
three months at the Squadron Officers 
School at Maxwell Air Force Base in 
Montgomery, Alabama, where he grad- 
uated at the top of a class of 900. 

He had been in the Air Force ROTC 
at the University and was a member 
of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. 

Lt. McKenzie leaves his wife, the 
former Carolyn Nicely, two children, 
his parents, and two brothers. 

Maurice Talbott (Todie) Riggs 

Maurice Talbott (Todie) Riggs, A & S 
'20, died March 31 at the age of 62. 
Mr. Riggs was a former coach at St. 
John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, 
and a star athlete at the University ol" 
Maryland. He was named All-Southern 
halfback. 

After Mr. Riggs' graduation he en- 
tered professional baseball and was 
signed to the Senators. During his base- 
ball career, he also taught in Suffolk 
High School, coaching all three sports. 

After which he became coach of all 
sports at St. John's and helped organize 
the Mason-Dixon Conference. 

(Continued on next page) 



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May-June, J 962 



35 



In the mid-thirties St. John's dropped 
athletics and he began teaching in 
Montgomery County schools. He was 
principal at Sherwood High School in 
I *->-+ 1 . In 1946 he served as Assistant 
Headmaster of Black-Fox Military 
Academy in Hollywood. California. 

He served as Counselor for Rockville 
Junior High in 1954. and later in the 
same capacity at Broome Junior High 
in Rockville. In 1960 he transferred to 
Richard Montgomery High School as 
Counselor. 

Mr. Riggs also did character acting 
in documentary movies for Norwood 
Studios. Washington, D. C. 

He is survived by his wife, the former 
Dorothy May Cuttler of Rockville. 
Maryland. 



William H. Richardson 

William H. Richardson, a former Drug- 
gist and a Director of the Noxzema 
Chemical Company, died March 28, at 
the age of 82. 

He was born in Wicomico County and 
came to Baltimore in 1903, where he 
attended the old Maryland College of 
rharmacy. He owned a drug store at 
Charles Street and Mount Royal Ave- 
nue from 1910 to 1919. 

He had been a director of the Nox- 
zema Chemical Company since it was 
incorporated in 1917. In the early 1930's 
he was instrumental in opening the mid- 
western and New England districts for 
the Company. 

Mr. Richardson is survived by his 
wife, Mrs. Emma Robertson Richardson, 
a daughter, two stepchildren, a brother, 
and four grandchildren. 



William L. Byerly, Jr. 

William L. Byerly, Jr.. died unexpect- 
edly January 18. He was 44. Death was 
attributed to a cerebral hemorrhage. 

Following his graduation from the 
School of Medicine in 1942. he interned 
at the University Hospital. Later he 
served in the United States Army Med- 
ical Corps, rising to the rank of Captain. 
At the end of World War II, he returned 
to the University Hospital in 1948 
where he became Chief Resident in 
Surgery. After completing this training, 
he joined his father. Dr. W. L. Byerly, 
Sr. at the Byerly Hospital in Hartsville, 
S. C, and was Chief Surgeon there at 
the time of his demise. 

He was a Diplomate of the American 
Board of Surgery, Fellow of the Amer- 
ican College of Surgeons, and member 
of its credentials committee for South 
Carolina. He was a member of the 
American Medical Association, the 
South Carolina Medical Association, the 
Darlington County Medical Association, 
the Southeastern Surgical Society, the 
South Carolina Surgical Society, and 
the Medical Surgical Society of Balti- 
more. Dr. Byerly was very actively en- 
gaged in both church and civic organ- 
izations. He is survived by his widow, 
the former Louise McDonald, one 
daughter, and three sons. 

J. Howard Franz, M.D. 



Louis W. Grossman, Jr. 

Louis W. Grossman, Jr., of 7 S. Mill 
St., Newcastle, Pa., died recently. 




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Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works ;o 

Advertisers Engraving Companj 28 

Alcazar 97 

American Disinfectant I ... 25 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc. 29 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., In.. .;.; 

Arnold's Village Shop 30 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 26 
Atchison & Keller, Inc. 






Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. 

Inside Hack Cover 

Baltimore Envelope Co 29 

Ban! Avon School . . 28 

Bell Telephone System Back Cover 

Bergmann's Laundry 32 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co.. Inc. . .1-1 

Hon Ton Food Products 30 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc. 34 

Briggs & Company, Meat Products 34 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 30 

I). Harry Chambers, Opticians 34 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 24 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 35 

Del Haven White House Motel 34 



Embassy Daii y 



36 



Farmers Cooperative Assn 54 

J. H. Filbert Co 

First Federal Savings &■ Loan Assn. 35 

John G. Fitzgerald, Plumbing and Heating 34 

Fuller & d' Albert, Inc 33 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 28 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 25 

Harvey Dairy 35 

Hotel Harrington 3(1 

The House of Sound ;n 

The In Town Motor Hotels 25 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc .31 

King Bros., Inc 29 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co. ... 28 



John D. Lucas Printing Company 

Lustine Chevrolet 



33 

3 1 



Maria's Restaurant 27 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 34 

Massey-Ferguson. Inc ... 31 

Modern Machinists Co 31 

Morrison & Fifer 28 

Murray-Baumgartner 27 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc ii 



North Washington Press, Inc. 
Norman Motor Company, Inc. 



Ocean City, Md 29 

Occidental Restaurant 21 

Oles Envelope Corp 26 

Olney Inn 27 

Ottenberg's Bakers. Inc 31 

Park Transfer Co 35 

William A. Potthast, Insurance 26 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc. 

Scars Roebuck and Co. 

Seidenspinner Realtor 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 

Strayer College 

Student's Supply Store 

Suburban Trust Company 
Sweetheart Bread 



Charles II. Tames. Jr.. Insurance 
Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 



Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 

Wallop & Son. Insurance .... 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 

Perry < >. Wilkinson 

Williams Construction Company, Inc. 

J. McKenny Willis & Sons. Inc 



York Wholesaler-, Inc. 
Duke Zcibert's Restaui an! 



27 
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25 
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36 



THii Maryland Magazine 



5 YOUR HOME ^ 




f »R SUMMER C " 1 




Keep cool with HOUSEPOWER 

Adding a new air conditioner this summer? First, you'd better make sure 
that your present wiring system . . . already burdened with a houseful of 
hard-working appliances ... can carry the extra load. 

HOUSEPOWER is the answer to all your home electrical needs, summer and 
winter. It gives your wiring the needed capacity to keep appliances operating 
efficiently and economically ... and plenty to spare when cooling units, 
dehumidifiers, refrigerators and freezers work overtime in sweltering weather. 

Why spend a hot, sticky summer when you can be cool and comfortable with 
modern HOUSEPOWER? Here's what you get: At least 100 ampere service . . . 
carefully planned circuits . . . enough convenience outlets and switches in 
every room. 

Get a FREE SURVEY of your wiring and an estimate of the cost of bringing it 
up to date. 

PLAN NOW... DO IT NOW . . . PAY LATER! 

There is an easy HOUSEPOWER financing plan offered by the Baltimore Gas and Electric 
Company ... low monthly payments on your electric bill. 

For a free wiring survey and financing details, call your ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR or the 
Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. 



OUR 146th YEAR 



Gas and Electric 



PROGRESS • SERVICE • DEPENDABILITY 




22 

MAY 24962 *.»• 




,. v oo 24962 A-P- 



If this new type deposited carbon resistor were placed in 
service today, would it perform until 24962 A.D. ? 



Frankly, we do not expect a single resistor to last that 
long. However, this 23,000-year life span is expressed 
in another way— not more than one failure in 23.000 
resistor years, or a rate of .0005% /one thousand hours 
in certain missile system resistors for which the Bell 
System is responsible. 

Substantial numbers of laboratory tests predict that 
this high degree of reliability will be achieved over a 
reasonable span of years. 

For missile systems employing millions of these 
resistors to be practical, the above failure rate must be 
attained. The Bell System — through its manufacturing 
and supply unit, Western Electric— found that manual 
methods of manufacturing were inadequate. 



So a completely automated production process, 
utilizing a digital computer as the heart of the new 
system, was designed and built. It is the first of its 
kind. The computer maintains the necessary process 
controls throughout production in order to insure the 
high reliability required. 

This dramatic example of the Bell System's com- 
munications dependability is another instance of the 
high standards applied to the Bell System's work in the 
nation's defense. 



JL| BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




Maryland Room 

Umirctsity of Maryland Library 

College Park, Md. 



Alumni Publication of the University of Marylan 




magazine 




'olume XXXIV Number Four • July-August 1962 



• The University Graduates its Largest Class 

• Portrait of a Young Alumnus 

• Alumni Day at College Park 



1 



Terrapin Ticket Information 






UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FOOTBALL 1962 



Don't Be Disappointed. Order Season Tickets Now! 

HOME GAMES 

S.M.U. — Sept. 22 So. Carolina — Oct. 27 Clemson — Nov. 17 Virginia — Nov. 24 
(Band Day) (Homecoming) (Parents Day) 

It is our policy to fill applications for season tickets first. 

SEASON TICKETS — FOUR HOME GAMES, $16.00 

(Make check payable to UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND.) 
No Phone Orders Accepted. 

Additional tickets for individual games will not be adjacent to season ticket seats. 
Over-the-counter sale begins September 1. 

1 . Please make payment by check or money order, payable to University of Mary- 
land, and mail to Ticket Office, Box 295, College Park, Md. Do not send cash. 

2. Due to volume of mail at this particular time of year, it is regretted that acknowl- 
edgment of applications cannot be made. Tickets will be mailed as soon as 
possible. 



SEASON— All Home Games- 1 962 $1 6.00 

S.M.U.— -Band Day 2:00 P.M. Sept. 22 $4.00 

So. Carolina— Homecoming 2:00 P.M. Oct. 27 $4.00 

Clemson— Parents Day 1:30 P.M. Nov. 17 $4.00 

Virginia 1:30 P.M. Nov. 24 $4.00 

AWAY GAMES 

Wake Forest (Night) Sept. 29 $4.00 

North Carolina State Oct. 6 $4.00 

North Carolina Oct. 13 $4.50 

Miami (Night) Oct. 19 $4.50 

Penn State Nov. 3 $4.00 

Duke Nov. 10 $4.50 



the 




magazine 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIV Number 4 

The Cover: James E. Dingman, M.H. '21, explains the operation oi 
Project Telestar, a communications satellite system, to an audience oi 

nearly 200 representatives of the Congress and the Federal government, 
science, industry and education. The special closed circuit presentation was 
made on .Inly 10, the day o\' Tclcstar's launching. Telestar served as an 
antenna and transmitter for a program of taped and live comment between 
Andover, Maine and the audience in the Elihu Root Hall in the Carnegie 
Institution, Washington, I). C. During the demonstration, signals were 
picked by the French communications system at Pletimeur Bodu, Brittany. 
This prompted the sponsor of Telestar. the American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, to inaugurate the next day a new era in international com- 
munication by transmitting and receiving video and audio across the 3.000 
miles which separate the new and old worlds. Mr. Dingman is Executive 
Vice President of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. In 
1960 the University bestowed upon him the honorary degree, Doctor of 
Engineering. 






Z* The University Graduates Its Largest Class 

O Portrait of a Young Alumnus 

1 \J Alumni Day Attracts Many to Campus 

1 D Maryland Books and Authors 

1 T" The Alumni Diary 

1 U Alumni and Campus Notes 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE, Assistant Treasurer 
RICHARD W. CASE 

1 HOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
DR. REGINALD V. TRUITT, '14, President 
DR. WILLIAM H. TRIPLETT, '11, Vice-President 
HARRY HASSLINGER, '33, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 

DAVID I . BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN. Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12, Md. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3,1879.-$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 




left : Principal Speaker 
Thomas B. McCabe. far 
left: Composer Richard 
Rodgers receives an hon- 
orary degree, Doctor of 
Music, from President 
El kins. 




The University Graduates 
Largest Class in its History 



THE TRADITIONAL STRAINS OF THE TRIUMPHAL 
March from Aida by Verdi echoed throughout 
the bunting-bedecked Cole Activities Building at 
10 a.m. Saturday, June 9, and ushered in the 1962 
Commencement exercises at the University of Maryland. 
Some 12,500 parents, friends, faculty and alumni were 
witnesses as University President Wilson H. Elkins con- 
ferred degrees upon 3,039 students, the largest graduating 
class in the history of the University. 

Greetings were extended to the gathering by His Excel- 
lency, The Honorable J. Millard Tawes, Governor of the 
State. Principal Commencement speaker was Thomas 
B. McCabe, Chairman of the Board of Directors and chief 
executive officer of The Scott Paper Company. He told the 
graduates that opportunities for them are undoubtedly 
greater today than ever before because of the broad indus- 
trial, scientific, and educational foundations upon which 
they can build. "During the last half-century we have 
woven into our fabric of everyday living innumerable 
advances in practical knowledge as well as a variety of 



protective devices which moderate many of the uncertain- 
ties affecting your future life," he said. "By providing a 
greater degree of security, these developments widen the 
area of adventure. In fact, there is so much emphasis on 
the philosophy of security these days that I am genuinely 
concerned lest too much emphasis on security will seriously 
impair the spirit of adventure which has heretofore char- 
acterized American business enterprise. 

"In spite of the recent dramatic events in the stock 
market and the steel debacle," he declared, "the American 
economy is still forging ahead and will continue to do so 
unless public confidence becomes seriously impaired. Fre- 
quently our leaders in all walks of life either forget or do 
not have the practical knowledge to recognize that the 
most important word in our economic dictionary is 'con- 
fidence.' If the public has confidence in our political and 
business leadership, our economy expands — at times pro- 



Continued on Page Four 

the Maryland Magazine 




M. Paul-Henri Spaak, Foreign Minister of Belgium, addresses European Division graduates in Heidelberg. 



digiously. Once confidence is shaken, the economic ma- 
chine falters and slows down until confidence is once 
again restored. The length of time this takes often depends 
on the understanding and support which we give our 
leaders, both in government and in business." 

Following Mr. McCabe's address, an honorary doctor 
of laws degree was conferred upon him by Dr. Elkins in 
recognition of his long and distinguished career in business 
and public service. 

An honorary degree of doctor of music was awarded 
by Dr. Elkins to distinguished guest, Richard Rodgers, 
two-time Pulitzer Prize winner who, with Oscar Hammer- 
stein 2nd, wrote and composed such productions as "Okla- 
homa," "South Pacific," "King and I," "Flower Drum 
Song," "Carousel," and "Sound of Music." As a tribute 
to Mr. Rodgers, the Combined Chapel Choir, Men's Glee 
Club and Women's Chorus, under the direction of Fague 
K. Springmann, sang with moving intensity, "You'll Never 
Walk Alone," written by Mr. Rodgers for "Carousel." 

Detlev W. Bronk, President of the Rockefeller Institute 
for Medical Research and former President and now trus- 
tee of Johns Hopkins University, received an honorary 
doctor of science degree, in recognition for his work as 
a scientist, educator and research administrator. He is 



a member of the Advisory Committee for Biology and 
Medicine for the Atomic Energy Commission and the 
President's Science Advisory Committee for the National 
Aeronautics and Space Agency. 

Honorary certificates of merit in agriculture were award- 
ed to four Maryland citizens for their contributions to 
agriculture in the State. They were Nellie Pahlman Altvater, 
Talbot County; Peter Wood Chichester, Frederick County; 
Howard Calhoun Davidson, Saint Mary's County; and 
Roland Hobbs Mullinix, Carroll County. 

Following the presentation of honorary degrees and 
certificates, the graduates walked across the platform and 
received their degrees and congratulatory handshakes, 
accompanied by an organ medley of musical scores by 
Richard Rodgers. 



COMMENCEMENT WAS PRECEDED BY CONSIDERABLE 
activity in the various schools and colleges within 
the University. John B. Funk, Chairman of the 
Maryland State Roads Commission, three Uni- 
versity of Maryland faculty members and 16 University 
students were initiated into Tau Beta Pi, national engineer- 
ing honorary society in a ceremony on Saturday, May 12. 






Young graduate nurses celebrate the completion of their academic- 
studies by joining in an all-day picnic on the Severn River. 




Mrs. E. Benton Taylor, who annually awards 
a scholarship for four years of dental study, 
congratulates this year's recipient and Gold 
Medal winner, Paul William Bushman. 






Cental Alumni at their annual i>olf tournament. From left: Harry Dressel, 
am Bryant, Ed Stone, Al Sayauskas, Harry Kohlhepp, Kyrl I'reis. 

Mr. Funk was elected to membership for his contributions 
to engineering in the State. Honored faculty members in- 
clude Dr. Robert B. Beckman, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Chemical Engineering; Associate 
Professor Clifford L. Sayre of the Department of Mechan- 
ical Engineering; and Associate Professor A. Bernard 
Eyler, also of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. 
New student initiates are: Frank R. Clifton, Hugh Lupien, 
Jr., L. Grady Stout, John O. Gurney, Mechanical Engi- 
neering; David B. Fradkin, Aeronautical Engineering; 
Donald L. Robey, Harold F. Kelly, James F. Leverett, 
Yu W. Chan, Chemical Engineering; Howard J. Flichman, 
Richard D. Ford, William J. Parker, Charles S. Kadesch, 
Ray A. Kalpas, Jaan A. Loger, Robert T. Schwartz, Elec- 
trical Engineering. 

Also in College Park was the traditional Baccalaureate 
Service held Sunday, June 3. The Rev. J. Lawrence 
Plumley of Shreveport, Louisiana, an Episcopalian min- 
ister who graduated in 1933 from the University of Mary- 
land, delivered the traditional address in the University's 
Memorial Chapel. His daughter, Pam Plumley Barineau, 
was among the graduates who attended the services. 

Numerous pre-Commencement activities also took place 
on the Baltimore campus. Dr. Noel E. Foss, Dean of the 




The ninth annual honors convocation 

of the School of I'hamuK \ . 

University's School of Pharmacy, was chosen as the recipi- 
ent of the L962 Honored Alumnus Award at the annual 
meeting of the School's Alumni Association on May 17. 

Dr. F. M. Miller, class advisor, presided over a senior 
assembly on Friday, June 1, at the School of Pharmacy. 
Speakers included representatives of the Baltimore Metro- 
politan Pharmaceutical Association, the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association, the Baltimore Branch of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, and the Alumni 
Association of the school. 

The Pharmacy senior banquet and prom was held on 
Monday, June 4, at Bluecrest, Fordleigh, and the ninth 
annual honors convocation took place Thursday, June 7. 
in the auditorium of the Health Sciences Library. Dr. 
Foss, Dean, presided, and Dr. George F. Archambault. 
President of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 
was principal speaker. David Andrew Blake was installed 
as new President of the Student Government Alliance by 
the outgoing President, Allan S. Pristoop. Newly elected 
class officers were also installed, including President Irwin 
Alvin Heyman, class of 1963. Prizes and awards for aca- 
demic excellence and extracurricular activities were pre- 
sented to outstanding graduates and undergraduates, and 
the Rev. H. Kearney Jones of St. James Episcopal Church. 



An overall view of the pre-commencement Dental alumni banquet. 




Dr. C. P. Scarborough, of the Medical 
Alumni Board of Directors, talks with 
Dr. C. J. Stallworth, of Thomaston, 
Alabama, a 50-year graduate of the 
School of Medicine. 




Jrvington, delivered the invocation and benediction. The 
I l Ki2 graduates were guests of the School's Alumni Asso- 
ciation at its annual Graduation Banquet and Dance. David 
L. Brigham. Director of Alumni Relations, was toastmaster. 
Pre-Commencement celebrations at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine began with the Senior Class 
dinner dance on Tuesday, June 5, at Bluecrest North, in 
Pikesville. 

Alumni Day was convened on Thursday, June 7. Three 
speakers addressed the morning session at Davidge Hall. 
Dr. William S. Stone, Dean, welcomed the alumni and 
spoke on "The Changing Philosophy in Medical Educa- 
tion at the University of Maryland," and Dr. Albin O. 
Kuhn, Executive Vice President of the University, and 
Lad F. Grapski, Director of University Hospital, described, 
"The Expansion Program of the Baltimore Campus." The 
Annual Alumni Award and Gold Key were presented to 
Dr. Arturo Raymond Casilli, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, a 
1914 graduate, and a distinguished pathologist and inves- 
tigator who played an important role in organizing medical 
laboratories in New Jersey. 

Thursday afternoon was devoted to reunions of the class 
of 1912 and every fifth year thereafter, followed by the 
annual banquet that evening at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 
Besides Dr. Casilli, guests of honor included Mrs. John 
L. Whitehurst, member of the University's Board of Re- 
gents; Dr. Albin O. Kuhn and Mrs. Kuhn; Dr. William S. 
Stone and Mrs. Stone; Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, President 
of the General Alumni Association of the University and 
Mrs. Truitt; Dr. Frank K. Morris, President of the Medical 
Alumni Association and Mrs. Morris; Dr. George H. 
Yeager, President-elect of the Medical Alumni Associa- 
tion and Mrs. Yeager; and the Right Rev. Roger K. 
Wooden, pastor of Blessed Sacrament Church. Certificates 
of life membership were awarded to 50-year graduates of 
the University of Maryland, the Baltimore Medical College 
and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 1912. 

Dean's day was celebrated at the medical 
School on Friday, June 8. Dr. Kenneth Good- 
ner, Professor of Microbiology and Head of the 
Department at Jefferson Medical College in 
Philadelphia, was principal speaker. His subject was 
"World Medicine." The nurses' choral group, under the 
direction of Charles A. Halsup, sang several selections and 
prizes and honors were awarded to outstanding students 
by Dean Stone. Wives of the medical students, who acted 
as ushers at the ceremony, were also hostesses at a recep- 
tion and tea for graduates, parents, friends and faculty at 
the Baltimore Union. 



The School of Nursing featured several activities as a 
tribute to its graduating seniors. On Sunday, June 3, special 
honors were awarded by Miss Virginia C. Conley, chair- 
man of the baccalaureate program, to nine graduating 
nurses at the senior convocation in the Health Sciences 
Library Auditorium. Recipients were: Ann Seymour, 
Nurses' Alumnae Association Award for the highest aver- 
age in scholarship; Pearl Holland, the Elizabeth Collins 
Lee Award, for the second highest average in scholarship; 
Barbara Edward, the Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Award, for 
executive ability; Jane C. Green, the Flora Hoffman Tarun 
Memorial Award, for leadership, loyalty and school spirit; 
Joan Chambers, the Mrs. Charles A. Reifschneider Award, 
for the best professional appearance and conduct toward 
patients and hospital personnel; Caroline Lewis, the Neu- 
rosurgical Nursing Prize, for the most interest, enthusiasm 
and proficiency in neurosurgical nursing; Barbara Miller, 
the Elizabeth Aitkenhead Award for the most interest, 
enthusiasm, and proficiency in operating room nursing; 
Anne McCaughey, the Women's Auxiliary Board Award, 
for outstanding performance in professional nursing care; 
Ann Seymour, Nurses' Alumnae Association Award for 
leadership in professional student nursing organization. 

Dean Florence M. Gipe greeted the graduating students. 
Principal speaker was Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs. 

Also on Sunday, June 4, the Nursing seniors attended 
the baccalaureate service in the Chapel at College Park, 
and on Monday, June 4, they held their traditional banquet 
and cap-stringing ceremonies at The Barn on Ritchie 
Highway. An all-day picnic was held Wednesday, June 
6, on the Severn River, and on Friday, June 7, the seniors 
were guests of the Nurses' Alumnae Association at Blue- 
crest North. 

Newly elected members of the honorary dental frater- 
nity, Omicron Kappa Upsilon, at the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, were announced Wednesday evening, 
June 6, at the fraternity's annual pre-Commencement 
banquet and convocation at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

The initiates were introduced by Dean Myron S. Aisen- 
berg. Members chosen from the graduating class were 
Robert Apfel, Paul William Bushman, Richard Farish 
Downes, Jr., Charles Augustus Gallagher, David Biainard 
Kirby, Jr., Martin Kline, Daniel Levy, Donald E. Lilley, 
Joseph Anthony Salvo and Allen H. Simmons. 

Faculty membership in OKU was awarded to Dr. Jose 
H. Diaz, Assistant Professor in the Department of Opera- 
tive Dentistry, in recognition of his contribution to the 
profession of dentistry. 

Dr. Russell Fisher, Chief Medical Examiner of the 



Fifty-year graduates and their wives are welcomed by alumni of the School of Medicine at their banquet in Baltimore. 





DEGREE 




CERTIFICATES CONFERRED 


JUNE 9, 1962 




Graduate School 




Ph.D. 


90 
19 


Ed.D 


M.A 


122 


M.S. 


128 
1 13 


M.Ed 


M.B.A. 


20 


Medicine . 


95 

88 
97 


Dentistry 


Law 


Agriculture 


66 


Arts and Sciences 




B.A. 


. . 377 


B.S 


153 


B.M. 


5 

235 


Business and Public Administration 


Education 




B.A. 


89 
259 


B.S 


Engineering 


225 


Home Economics 


57 


Nursing 


74 


Pharmacy 


43 


Physical Education, Recreation 




and Health 


55 


University College 




B.A. 


220 


B.S. 


409 




Grand Total . . 


3,039 



State of Maryland, and Professor of Forensic Pathology 
at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, was 
principal speaker. 

Dr. Richard C. Leonard, Lecturer in Public Health 
Dentistry, who presided at the meeting, retires this year 
as President of OKU and also retires from the faculty of 
the University of Maryland after 3 1 years of service. 

Graduates and alumni of the college of Dental Surgery 
were honored Friday morning, June 8, at an Academic 
and Awards Program at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

Dean Myron S. Aisenberg presented the following 
student awards: University Gold Medal for Scholarship, 
Summa Cum Laude, Paul William Bushman; Certificates 
of Honor, Magna Cum Laude, Donald Eugene Lilley, 



Martin Kline. Joseph Anthony Salvo, Jr.. Robert Aplcl 
and Richard Farish Downes, Jr.; The Alumni Association 

Medal. George ( aiv ( leiulenin; I he Hairv 1 . I atchman 
Memorial Medal, lee Howard Roper; I he Hanv I Kelsej 
Memorial Award for Professional Demeanor. George 
Joseph Goodreau, Jr.; The Harry B. Schwartz Award, 
Robert Randolph Parker; The Edgar J. Jacques Memorial 
Award. Joseph Anthony Salvo. Jr.; The Herbert Friedberg 
Memorial Key. John Thomson, 111: The Timothy O. Heat- 
wole Chair. Richard Farish Downes, Jr.; The Katharine 
Toomey Plaque, James Emil Andrews; The Sigma Epsilon 
Delta Memorial Medal, Paul William Bushman; The Alpha 
Omega Scholarship Award. Paul William Bushman; I he 
Alexander H. Paterson Memorial Medal. Lawrence Frank 
Halpert; The Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal. Richard 
Farish Downes, Jr. 

Paul-Henri Spaak. Belgian Foreign Minister and pioneer 
spirit of European unity, called for a politically united 
Europe at the Spring Commencement Exercises of the 
University of Maryland European Division on June 3. in 
Heidelberg, Germany. 

One hundred and thirty-nine military and civilian per- 
sonnel stationed in countries throughout Europe received 
bachelor degrees in formal cap and gown ceremonies in 
the Neue Aule of Heidelberg University. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University President, personally 
conferred degrees on each of the graduates. In addition, 
he conferred honorary degrees of doctor of law on both 
Mr. Spaak and the Honorable Walter C. Dowling. United 
States Ambassador to West Germany, who was also 
present. Spaak was introduced by Honorable Douglas 
MacArthur III, United States Ambassador to Belgium, who 
accompanied the Vice Premier to Heidelberg for the 
Commencement. 

Four of the graduates listed Maryland as their home 
state. They were Ft. Col. Robert E. Barry, of Brentwood; 
Maj. Russell A. Cogar, of Severna Park; Stephen J. Hart- 
man, of Cheverly; and Captain Daniel W. Nicholson, also 
of Cheverly. 

The fifth annual formal Commencement of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland's Far East Division was held in Tokyo 
on March 28, when 78 U. S. servicemen and civilians 
received bachelor's degrees. More than 1,200 guests ob- 
served the 51 students receive their degrees in person from 
Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Executive Vice President. 

U. S. Ambassador to Japan. Edwin (). Reischaucr. 
delivered the Commencement address and was awarded an 
honorary doctor of laws degree. Tamon Molda, former 
Japanese Education Minister, also received an honorary 
doctor oii laws degree. 

The graduates were among some 5.000 students who 
attended evening classes on a part-time basis at 45 military 
installations in Japan. Okinawa. Korea. Taiwan and Guam. 



July-August, 1962 



7 




Portrait of a Young Alumnus 

Robert Scott Couchman is a marked man. Dean, teacher and company 

executives watch with admiration as this young 1959 engineering 

graduate builds for himself the beginnings of a brilliant career. 



IN THE THREE YEARS SINCE HIS GRADUATION ROBERT 
Scott Couchman, M.E., '59, has become a genuine 
authority in a new engineering field. His success in the 
relatively new area of "combined cycles" in the design 
of turbines has made him a young man to watch in the 
General Electric Company in Schenectady, New York. 
GE's evaluation: "He has a brilliant future." 

The University's evaluation of Couchman preceded 
GE's by several years. As a senior in high school in Hagers- 
town, he applied for and received a full four-year Univer- 
sity Scholarship. The University's expectations were soon 
realized; he quickly became an outstanding student. Dean 
Frederic T. Mavis remembers: "This young man was tops. 
He definitely had what it takes, in both a technical and 
personal sense." The University record shows that he 
graduated second in a class of 208 engineers, and fifteenth 
in an all-University class of 1,947 students. 

Recalling his undergraduate days, Couchman says that 
"the high quality program offered by the School of Engi- 
neering has provided me with a good background which 
has sustained me in my work at GE." 



The high degree of career orientation Couchman dis- 
played as an undergraduate was most unusual. While 
many Seniors develop a strong preference for a product 
area (missiles, computers, reactors), few have a detailed 
understanding of the specific technical work to which 
their skills can be applied. No doubt his summer work in 
1956, 1957 and 1958 with the Potomac Edison Power 
Company was a profound influence, rousing his interest in 
steam turbine generators. It was during this time that he 
recognized the challenge which existed in the therm- 
odynamic problem of turbine design. 

As he prepared to graduate, competition for his serv- 
ices was intense. He accepted an offer of employment from 
General Electric and entered the company as a member 
of their Engineering and Science Program. 

His first Program assignment was in just the depart- 
ment he wanted, although not in the area of work on 
which he had set his sights. In a matter of weeks, however, 
an excellent match of man and job was consummated and 
Couchman went "off-Program" to accept a permanent 
position in the Steam Design component of Turbine En- 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 





Like so many of his generation, Robert Couch man seemed to discover early 
what kind of a career he wanted, and then set eagerly to work to achieve it. 



gincering Operations. It was unusual for a young man 
hired for GE's Engineering and Science Program to so 
quickly leave the Program to accept a specific position. 
One of the purposes of the Program is to provide opportun- 
ity for graduates to experience a variety of technical work 
in a series of three or four-month assignments, while avail- 
ing themselves of advanced education opportunities. Most 
Program men accept permanent positions after nine 
months or a year and many remain on Program for two 
or three years, depending upon the extent of their par- 
ticipation in advanced courses. 



k^TEAM DESIGN ENGINEERING IS A PIVOTAL UNIT WITHIN 

the Large Steam Turbine-Generator engineering organiza- 
tion. Since all large power-makers are custom designed 
for a specific application, much study is involved before 
customer can write equipment specifications. Primary con- 
cerns of the customer are capability (rated generating 
capacity), performance (efficiency of operation), and 
price. Turbine efficiency gains of a fraction of one percent 
can save many thousands of dollars in operating costs. 
When a customer contemplates adding to his generating 
capacity, Steam Design Engineering is called upon to help 
propose the optimum solution. Steam Design predicts 
thermodynamic performance obtainable within limits im- 
posed by circumstances of application. Based upon these 
and other feasibility studies, the customer prepares equip- 
ment specifications and asks for bids. If General Electric 
is successful bidder, Steam Design Engineering is then 
responsible for thermodynamic design of turbine to meet 
performance guarantees. 

Although the youngest (25) permanent engineer in 
Steam Design, Couchman has already become an authority 
in the relatively new area of "combined cycles." Pending 
further materials break-throughs, combined (steam tur- 
bine-gas turbine) cycles are the best avenue for improv- 
ing turbine performance. In parallel with the rapid as- 
similation of combined cycle technology, Couchman has 



also become an expert in boiler performance for high 
pressure cycles. In addition, his work involves thorough 
knowledge of the economics of the electric utility industry 
and of GE's development, design and production cap- 
abilities. 

Couchman handles a wide variety of assignments — 
each unique. His superiors report that his ability to learn, 
understand and apply new concepts and techniques is 
remarkable, and that his rapidly growing technical com- 
petence is widely respected by professional associates both 
within GE and among utility customers. His excellent 
training at the University in thermodynamics, fluid flow, 
strength of materials and stresses plus an ability to apply 
this knowledge in new situations has served him well. 

In his first year with GE, Couchman took the company 
course in Computer Programming and participated in the 
Creative Approach Seminar course. During the past two 
years he has been attending Union College two nights a 
week under the Company's Tuition Refund Program. He 
expects to complete work for the MS in Mechanical Engi- 
neering next year. Appropriately, his thesis subject will 
probably be on thermodynamic characteristics of super- 
critical pressure cycles. 

He is active in the Hudson-Mohawk Section of ASME, 
having served last year as Editor of the Newsletter and 
currently as member of the Section's Executive Board. 
He is married to the former Barbara Blake of Baltimore. 
They have a daughter, Elizabeth, a year and a half old. 
The Couchmans are members of Grace Lutheran Church 
and for a time he served as Assistant Scoutmaster of the 
church-sponsored Troop. The Couchmans live in Sheridan 
Village Apartments, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Three years after his graduation. Robert Scott Couch- 
man looks back to his undergraduate days and emphasizes: 
"From my own experiences I know now of the high 
quality of the University of Maryland's School of Engi- 
neering. The School offers a program providing a good 
background oi engineering. 1 haven't lacked lor this in 
my work at GE." 



July-August, 1962 




Alumni Day Attracts 
Many To Campus 



Till DAY WAS PERFECT AND ALUMNI RETURNED TO 
the College Park campus in great numbers. The 
Student Union was the headquarters for a number 
of elass reunions of the College Park Alumni, as 
well as for live College Alumni Business Sessions. 

It was Saturday, May 12, and the early risers began 
reaching the campus shortly after 9:00 a.m. Following 
registration and a brief coffee hour the large group dis- 
bursed into many smaller segments. Alumnae of the Col- 



JO 



lege of Home Economics centered their activities in the 
Maryland Room of their College Building. Many others 
concentrated on old yearbooks, pictures, and memories. 
The Class of 1922 made a trip to the Chapel to present 
a unique and beautifully hand-made altar cloth which was 
the "labor of love" of Mrs. Mildred Smith Jones. This gift 
was a year in the making and is being used on the altar of 
the small Chapel. 

Just prior to the traditional chicken barbecue luncheon, 

the Maryland Magazine 



business sessions and elections were held. The following 
Association Presidents were elected: Agriculture, Mylo 
Downey, '27; Arts & Sciences, Joe Mathias, '35; Business 
& Public Administration, Thomas R. Bourne, Jr., '43; 
Education, Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein, '35; Engineering, 
Emmett T. Loane, '29; and Home Economics, Mrs. Mary 
Ward Davis, '55. 

In the afternoon, alumni attended athletic contests. 
visited campus points of interest, and attended additional 
reunions. The 1962 Varsity took the full measure of 
former Maryland football greats 24-0, giving full warn- 
ing to opponents on the schedule this Fall, Preceding the 
football game, the Maryland lacrosse team outclassed the 
Maryland Lacrosse Club, 21-3. 

The annual spring reunion of the alumni of the College 
of Home Economics took place on Saturday, May 12, in 
the Maryland Room of the College, beginning with regis- 
tration and a coffee hour at 9:30 a.m. 

Remarks were given at the business meeting by Mrs. 
Ruth Lee Clarke, Chairman of the Home Economics 
Board. New members elected to the Board were Erna 
Reidel Chapman, Doris Thompson Terry and Margaret 
Loar. 

Dr. Helen E. Clarke, Dean of Women at the University, 
spoke on "What Are We Educating Women For?" and 
Dean Selma Lippcatt elaborated on "Patterns of Progress." 

The Senior Award was presented to Claudia Brush and 
honorary awards were given to Erna Reidel Chapman and 
Mae Yingling Cotterman. 

No Alumni Day can be measured except in terms of 
those who returned. In this connection the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and the University may now report another real 
success. Many of those who honored us with their presence 
included the following: 

Attending from the Golden Anniversary Class of 1912 
were Fulton W. Allen, Salisbury; T. Raymond Burch, 
College Park; Earl R. Burrier, Scranton, Pennsylvania; 
Walter A. Furst, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida; Hugh C. F. Gill, 
Baltimore; J. M. Lednum, Sayville, New York; 1. A. 
Miller, College Park; James G. O'Conor, Washington, 



Dr. R. V. Truitt, President of the University Alumni 
Association, addressed the Home Economics Alum- 
nae. President Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke is presiding. 





President Elkins welcoming former students and 
greeting those who soon may be a pan of campus life. 



D.C.; Gilbert B. Posey, Washington, D.C.; Nathan R. 
Warthen, Kensington. 

The Class of 1917 was represented by H. B. Derrick, 
Towson; Clarence G. Donovan, Washington. DC; Wil- 
liam Dorsey Gray, Prince Frederick; William M. Kish- 
paugh, Hershey, Pennsylvania; Preston M. Nash. St. 
Petersburg, Florida; Seymour W. Ruff, Randallstown; 
A. H. Sellman, Washington, D.C.; Bernard F. Senart. 
Sarasota, Florida; Clyde C. Tarbutton, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware; A. V. Williams, Baltimore. 

Representing the 40th Anniversary Class were Alfred 
S. Best, Chevy Chase; J. A. Butts. Beaver, Pennsylvania; 
F. R. Darkis, Durham, North Carolina; Edwin B. Filbert. 
Baltimore; Herbert D. Gilbert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: 
Mildred S. Jones, Arlington, Virginia; William W. Kirby, 
Rockville; S. R. Newell, Washington, D.C.; Clayton 
Reynolds, Denton; Clarence D. Sasscer, Arlington, Vir- 
ginia; H. Edwin Semler, Hagerstown; J. Herbert Snyder. 
Walkersville; Laurence J. Stabler, Wallingford. Pennsyl- 
vania; Bertha Ezckiel Topkis, Washington, D.C.; and 
Robert N. Young, Asheville, North Carolina. 

Those who have been out 35 years and returned were 
Josephine M. Blandford, Washington. D.C.; Arthur C. 
Boyd, Washington, D.C.; M. D. Burgee. Charlotte Hall; 
Mylo S. Downey, College Park; Howard E. Hassler. Wash- 
ington, D.C.; Elizabeth J. Taylor, Washington. D.C.; and 
Helen R. White, Hyattsville. 



T, 



HE "DEPRESSION" CLASS OF 1932 HAD THE FOLLOW- 

ing on campus: Louis W. Berger, Kensington; C. W. 
Cissel, campus; Herbert L. Davis, Ridgewood. New Jersey; 
George L. A. Dressel, Mt. Rainier; Mrs. Charles W. Louts. 
Flemington, New Jersey; Charles W. Fouts, Remington, 
New Jersey; Don F. Hammerlund, Silver Spring; W. Miles 
Hanna, Whiteford; Mary Ingersoll Jenkins, Silver Spring: 
Jess Krajovic, Upperco; W. M. Kricker, Sandy Spring; 
Aldrich F. Medbery, Silver Spring: Maurice J. Murphy. 
Sumner; Mrs. Paul E. Nystrom, Hyattsville; Mary Wells 
Roberts, West Virginia; J. Courtney Suter. Washington, 
D.C.; Arthur G. Turner, Scarsdale, New York; Robert 
M. Walker, Silver Spring; S. Chester Ward, College Park; 



July-August, 1962 



11 



No Alumni Day 

can be measured except 

in terms 

of those 

who returned .... 




A birds-eye view of 40 years through a reunion window. 



E. G. Whitehead, Washington, D.C.; Vera Klein Woods, 
Hyattsville; Joseph G. Zimring, Long Beach, New York. 

Celebrating their 25th Anniversary were Jack Downin, 
Arlington, Virginia; Gerald E. Fosbroke, Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts; Charles S. Fuytney, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
Ralph Gray, Kensington; Francis X. Jordan, Takoma 
Park; Mathew J. Haspert, Towson; Harold L. Kelly, Jr., 
Silver Spring; Alvin S. Klein, Frederick; Louis F. Ortenzio, 
University Park; J. D. Paddleford, Cumberland; Flora W. 
Reid, Orange, Virginia; Lucile Laws Smith, College Park; 
Stanley B. Watson, Hyattsville. 

There were six very special Alumni with us on Alumni 
Day, 1962 who attended Maryland prior to 1912. They 
were E. P. Walls, "03, Hyattsville; J. M. Hunter, '06, 
Church Hill; J. J. T. Graham, '06, Bowie; Temple J. 
Jarrell, '09, Hyattsville; Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Wash- 
ington, D.C.; and Lindsay McD. Silvester, '11, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Others who were with us to enjoy Alumni Day were 
Henry P. Ames, Arlington, Virginia; Charles G. Rems- 
burg, College Park; Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, President of 
the Alumni Association, Stevensville; E. P. Williams, 
Hyattsville; W. T. Perkins, Hyattsville; Roy S. Eyre, Wash- 
ington, D.C; J. Homer Remsberg, Middletown; Ted 
Bisscll, University Park; Geary Eppley, College Park; 
William Paul Walker, College Park; William P. Fussel- 
baugh, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; A. W. Hines, Gaithers- 
burg; C. Walter England, Silver Spring; Charles E. White, 
Hyattsville; William M. Duvall, Baltimore; M. H. Howard, 
Westfield, New Jersey; Geo. S. Langford, College Park; 
John W. Magruder, College Park; Minnie M. Hill, Wash- 
ington, D.C; M. Frances Wolfe, Silver Spring; George 
W. Fogg, College Park; Charles P. McFadden, Hunting- 
ton, New York; William H. Evans, University Park; 
Robert Lee Evans, Arlington, Virginia; A. B. Hamilton, 
Hyattsville; Col. Robert A. Hitch, Arlington, Virginia; 
E. T. Loanc, Baltimore; W. Lawrence Smallwood, Wash- 



ington, D.C; G. W. Algire, Seabrook; Ben Dyer, Glen- 
wood; Creston E. Funk, Washington, D.C; Guy W. Gien- 
ger, Hyattsville; Harry E. Hasslinger, College Park; 
Kathryn M. Christensen, College Park; Clara Dixon, 
Olivet; Jacob Friedman, Chillum; Jacob B. Sclar, Silver 
Spring; Frances P. Allen, Silver Spring; Tracy Coleman, 
Silver Spring; Virginia I. Coleman, Silver Spring; Paul E. 
Holmes, Greenbelt; Temple R. Jarrell, Fort Lauderdale, 
Florida; Joseph M. Mathias, Kensington; Dorothy L. 
Ordwein, Glen Burnie; Paul R. Poffenberger, Silver Spring; 
Frank Wise, Chevy Chase; Flo Orpwood, Hyattsville; 
Robert T. Reid, Orange, Virginia; F. D. Shoemaker, 
Washington, D.C; Abram Z. Gottwals, Upper Marlboro; 
Beck Lawrence, Hanover, Pennsylvania; George E. 
Lawrence, Hanover, Pennsylvania; Judy King Manning, 
Silver Spring; Jay Phillips, Kensington; Judson H. Bell, 
College Park; Hotsy Alperstein, Chevy Chase; Dr. Frank 
L. Bentz, Silver Spring; Hyman A. Berg, Baltimore; J. 
Grafton Osborn, Aberdeen; Mildred Hamilton Snively, 
Highland; Robert H. Smith, College Park; Marvin B. 
Solomon, Baltimore; Robert E. Stalcup, Odem, Texas; 
Klovia McKennon Tilley, Chevy Chase; W. Reeves Tilley, 
Chevy Chase; Seymour D. Wolf, Chevy Chase; M. Gist 
Welling, Adelphi; Tom Bourne, Hyattsville; Dan G. Rice, 
Silver Spring; Leslie A. Smith, College Park; William R. 
Nieman, Clarksville; James A. Stapp, College Park; Tom 
Orpwood, Hyattsville; E. P. Beachum, Bethlehem, Penn- 
sylvania; Edward S. Beach, Jr., Hyattsville; Clinton A. 
Clubb, Lititz, Pennsylvania; Dudley Taylor, Beltsvillc; 
Frank M. Clagett, Upper Marlboro; John R. Utermohle, 
E. Riverdale; Gordon H. Ward, Adelphi; C. Lawrence 
Wiser, Silver Spring; Dennis F. Abe, College Park; Burton 
H. BorofT, Silver Spring; Richard Bourne, College Heights 
Estates; John Forchielli, Schenectady, New York; Silas A. 
Miller, Schenectady, New York; George W. Vermer, 
Hyattsville; Larry E. Rouzer, Mt. Airy; William Bridges 
Smith, College Park. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



Maryland Books and Authors 



by Mrs. Harold Haves. 
Head. Maryland Room, McKeldin Library 



PRINCIPLES AND PRACTK I S 
OF SECONDARY EDUCATION, 

by Vernon E. Anderson and Wil- 
liam I . Gruhn. New York: Ronald. 
Second edition, 513 pp. $6.75. 

Principles and Practices o] Secon- 
dary Education, by Vernon E. Ander- 
son and William T. Gruhn, is a stim- 
ulating discussion of modern secon- 
dary education, which includes some 
of the trends that may well be indica- 
tive of the possible future direction 
of secondary education in America. 

The authors provide background 
information about the historical de- 
velopment of modern secondary edu- 
cation in America and present princi- 
ples upon which a program of educa- 
tion for all youth may be based. They 
raise provocative questions about the 
implementation of principles. They 
discuss the methods by which these 
principles may be applied so that the 
individual student may develop to his 
fullest potential in terms of his abili- 
ties and in relation to his role in a 
rapidly changing society. 

As stated in the Preface, the book 
"tells the story of secondary educa- 
tion in the United States, recording 
and evaluating the recent significant 
changes that have taken place. It has 
been especially written for the pre- 
service education student interested 
in keeping abreast of happenings in 
secondary education and in critically 
examining old and new practices. It 
will be equally useful, nevertheless, 
to the experienced teacher who is 
seeking information about current 
programs and trends in the schools." 

Of interest to all those in the field 
of education will be the presentation 
of some of the newer trends in secon- 
dary education, among which are the 
revision of the content of subjects, 
programs for the academically talent- 
ed, the use of new media and the tech- 
niques of instruction, team teaching, 
advanced placement plans, national 
testing programs, and programs for 
handicapped children. The authors 
include practices current in junior 
high schools, senior high schools, and 
community colleges. 

The chapters which include descrip- 
tions of school practices are of espe- 
cial interest perhaps. First, the prin- 
ciples basic to a modern program of 




Dean Anderson 

secondary education are presented, 
followed by descriptions of some com- 
mon practices and trends, descriptions 
of specific secondary school practices 
that implement the principles, and 
discussions of critical issues and prob- 
lems facing secondary education. 

Of valuable assistance to the stu- 
dent is the manner in which the book 
is organized. The first section presents 
the purposes of the secondary school, 
discusses the impact of American cul- 
ture on school policies and proce- 
dures, and describes the nature and 
needs of the pupils. The second part 
considers curriculum and instruction. 
The third section concerns organiza- 
tion and leadership and outlines the 
pupil services necessary for a good 
secondary school program. "The kind 
of leadership that a secondary school 
receives," state the authors, "in a 
large measure determines whether or 
not it will make progress in achieving 
changes to keep up with the rapidly 
accelerating pace of sociological and 
technical innovations." 

The fourth section concerns the 
evaluating of programs for the achiev- 
ing of quality and the need of the 
faculty to engage in continuous evalu- 
ation as well as in research. The 
authors, in considering the trends that 
are emerging from the practices evi- 
dent in modern secondary education 
throughout the nation today, present 
the possible future secondary school, 
its form and content, and the condi- 



tions necessary foi the change that 
they feel is necessary it the American 
secondary program i>i education i 

continue to lie a vital I<>ilc in 0U1 

society, 

The problems facing secondary ed 

ucation need lo be caret nils consid- 
ered by both educators and lay citi- 
zens. "The future existence i>i a tree 
society." the authors believe, "depends 
in large part upon the ability ol the 
secondary schools to prepare citizens 
who understand and value the basic 
ideals o\ freedom and who can ileal 
intelligently with the revolutionary 
changes brought about by develop- 
ments in science and technology. It is 
within this framework that we should 
examine the principles and practices 
of secondary education in America." 

Careful attention has been given 
in this book to a subject of major 
concern to both educators and lay citi- 
zens. The material, thoughtfully or- 
ganized, is presented in a clear and 
concise manner. 

"Principles and Practices in Secon- 
dary Education" contains valuable in- 
formation that should serve as a guide 
to those whose deepest concern is the 
education of children and youth so 
that they may be inspired to exert their 
greatest efforts as individuals and as 
citizens in a rapidly changing society. 

Reviewed by William S. Schmidt, 
who has been superintendent of 
schools in Prince George's County. 
Maryland, since January 1951. He has 
been closely associated with the 
Prince George's County Public Schools 
since 1944 when he became principal 
of Oxon Hill High School. 

Mr. Schmidt was born and raised 
in Frederick, Maryland. After com- 
pleting his undergraduate studies at 
Franklin and Marshall College, he did 
graduate work at Columbia, Pitts- 
burgh, Maryland, and George Wash- 
ington universities. 

Actively interested in educational 
and civic groups, he has been a leader 
in various educational organizations 
in the state and D. C. area. This past 
October, Mr. Schmidt was </ member 
of a group of IS educators who toured 
the Soviet Union to study some </\- 
pects of the Russian educational 
program. 



July- A ugust, 1 962 



13 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representatives : 

I K I 

H. M. Carroll, '20 
Paul M. Galbreath, "39 
Ahram Z. Gottwals, '38 

ARTS * SCIENCES 

Richard Bourne, '57 
Joseph M. Mathias, '35 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, '14 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr., '43 
Egbert F. Tingley, '27 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, '25 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 

Harry Hasslinger, '33 

Miss Dorothy L. Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett Loane, '29 
Tracy C. Coleman, '35 
Ben Dyer, '31 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34 
Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 



Emory H. Niles, '17 

Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 

G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Ernest I. Cornbrooks, Jr., '35 
Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth R. Hipp, '29 

Mrs. Norma S. Long, '49 

Mrs. Kathryn Prokop Donnelly, '48 

PHARMACY 



Hyman Davidov, '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 
Frank J. Slama, '24 



EX -OFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, '57 

Field Secretary 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton 

Nurs., '47; Edu., '51 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., Past President 
Frank Block, '24, Past President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Past President 
J. Homer Remsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '29, Past President 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, '19, Past President 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore— Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, '17 
Frederick County — 

Nelson R. Bohn, '51 
"M" Club — George Knepley, '38 
Montgomery County — 

Robert W. Beall, '31 
New York— Harold McGay, '50 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, '19 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, '26 
Washington County — 

( arson S. Couchman, '51 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



THIRTY THOUSAND EYES WERE FOCUSED FRONT AND CENTER AS 3,000 
minds were praised for accomplishment. The Cole Activities Building was 
the scene of the 1962 University of Maryland Commencement. Here was a 
visible demonstration of knowledge transmitted and absorbed. Generations 
of intellect, trial and error, and final achievement had been successfully com- 
pressed and stored in these young minds. 

As we joined in the applause, recognizing another completed step in the 
ladder of life, our mind turned to the responsibilities of this generation and 
to the possible decisions which must be made. It was reassuring to contemplate 
that each of our new alumni, men and women, who will serve with distinction 
in every walk of life, had been given the training and the tools with which to 
lead and follow, as the tides of world events may flow. 

The one dominant and inescapable factor is that this generation cannot 
escape the responsibility of making decisions. Previous generations are re- 
membered in spite of themselves for the groundwork which they laid. These 
new alumni like the many who preceded them are part of a great democratic 
image where no man is free to be without opinion. If freedom is to be pre- 
served, these opinions must be well-considered and based upon facts, tempered 
in the judgment of conscience and of our own souls. 

The reluctance of so many to accept responsibilities, the willingness to 
leave the hard decisions to the experts, is the direct erosion of faith — faith in 
God, faith in Country, and faith in oneself. It is for the college graduate, and 
in our case, for the alumnus of a great institution, to take the lead in pre- 
venting a further drift from these basic faiths, in order that an insecurity 
which would envelop our individual and national lives might be dispelled. 

As leaders, and university graduates must be, or all is lost, we are well 
aware that only the truth is important. No research becomes significant until 
it is proven beyond all doubt. No instructor is satisfied to present less than 
actual fact if he is worth his salt. No college graduate, be he novice or 
veteran, can be satisfied with limited responsibility in guiding his own destiny. 
We will not find inspired leadership in men and women who believe that states- 
manship and responsibility are matters of accommodation. 

At the center of every hurricane is an eye, an island of calm in the midst 
of violent forces. Whenever decisions are to be reached and controversies re- 
solved, we can count on our alumni to have the courage, the strength, and the 
depth to fight through to the eye of the hurricane. 

If this era of history explodes violently about us, we who have had these 
educational advantages must remain a stalwart bastion against all challenges to 
our way of life, our freedoms, and our faith. This is a time of great decision. 
It is likewise a period for positive action. We bear the stamp of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, and thereby inherit the awesome challenge, not only of 
assuring the future strength of our Country, but of holding up to others in the 
world an image of free men humble in their own strength and unfrightened by 
the challenges of our time. This the tradition ... it is also the future! 



Sincerely, 




Vhtl__^ 



David L. Brigham 
A lumni Secretary 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 




AUGUST 

6-11 State 4-H Club Week. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 

24 Instruction Begins. DECEMBER 

21 Christmas Recess Begins. 



SEPTEMBER 

4-7 Firemen's Short Course. 
17-21 Fall Semester Registration. 



NOVEMBER 

21 Thanksgiving Recess Begins. 
26 Thanksgiving Recess Ends. 



JANUARY 

3 Christmas Recess Ends. 
23 Pre-Examination Study Day. 




Following the special closed circuit demonstration of the 
Telestar communications system, July 10 in Washington, D.C., 
participants pose with a model of the satellite. From left to 
right: Dr. Edward C. Welsh, Executive Secretary of the Space 
Council; James E. Webb, NASA Administrator; Mr. Dingman, 
Maryland alumnus and A. T. and T. Executive Vice President 



who made the presentation to the leaders of the American 
government, education, science and industry: Senator John 
O. Pastore of Rhode Island; Vice President of the United 
States Lyndon H. Johnson: and Warren G. Magnuson, I s 
Senator from the State of Washington. 



July-August, 1962 



15 




John Belitza, Maryland's 15-foot, 4-inch, pole-vaulter, is pictured with Astronaut 
Colonel John H. Glenn at the Quant ico Relays. 



Peace Corps on Campus 

Peace Corps trainees are learning Turk- 
ish and Spanish this summer in the new 
Language Building on campus. The 
University of Maryland for the first 
time in its history has set up, under 
contract with the Peace Corps, a train- 
ing center for 1 18 Volunteers, who will 
be sent to Turkey, British Honduras, 
Ecuador and Venezuela. The program, 
which runs from June 25 to August 25, 
has Dr. A. R. Cardozier as Coordinator. 

The young men and women are 
trained intensively in the language, 
geography, economics, history and cul- 
tural traditions of their host nations, in 
American Studies, and in their partic- 
ular specialty. In addition, they are 
given training and conditioning under 
the direction of Mr. D. A. Steel of the 
University's Physical Education Depart- 
ment. 

Sixty students are being taught Turk- 
ish by Mr. Robert Meskill and his staff. 
Dr. Thomas S. Sutherland, Director of 
the Center's Language Studies and Pro- 
fessor of Spanish, reported: "Language 
is of the utmost importance to the 
Volunteers' success abroad. We are giv- 
ing them three to five hours per day 
— six days a week — of language instruc- 
tion with the full laboratory facilities 
ot the University's Foreign Language 
Department. This Maryland program is 
a first step in establishing a consortium 
of universities pooling their resources 
of scholarship, specialization and facil- 
ities to fill the complex needs of volun- 
teers sent to a growing number of for- 
eign countries." 

Dr. A. B. Hamilton, Assistant Co- 
ordinator, explained that World Affairs 



are being taught on our campus by 
specialists from Hopkins, and American 
Studies by George Washington Univer- 
sity. "Every volunteer," he stated, "se- 
lected on the basis of rigorous examin- 
ations, must have his own specialty. In 
many cases this is teaching, or it may 
be statistics, or bulldozing. A refresher 
short course in it is offered the trainee. 
Our program is expanding." 

A large instructorial staff is involved. 
Two Marylanders are included among 
the Volunteers, one who taught in a 
Slate secondary school, another, a grad- 
uate of the Maryland State College. 



Mr. McCormick To Direct 
U.S. Savings Bond Drive 

Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of 
the Board of Regents of the University 
of Maryland, Chairman of the Board 
of McCormick & Company, Chairman 
of the Baltimore Civic Center Com- 
mission, and a Director of the Equitable 
Trust Company of Baltimore, has been 
named Chairman of the Maryland Vol- 
unteer Savings Bond Drive. 

Mr. McCormick succeeds Royden A. 
Blunt, Baltimore industrialist who 
served as State Chairman of the Bond 
Drive since 1957. 

As Maryland's new State Chairman, 
Mr. McCormick brings a wealth of ex- 
perience to the Savings Bonds program. 
He has held such important posts as 
Director of the Federal Reserve Bank 
of Richmond; Chairman of the National 
Heart Fund campaign for two years, 
and the National Advisory Council on 



Naval Affairs. He is chairman of the 
Baltimore Civic Center Commission. 

The new State Chairman has actively 
participated in and directed several pub- 
lic service activities at the local and 
national level. In I960 he was awarded 
the Henry Laurence Gantt Memorial 
Gold Medal "for distinguished achieve- 
ment in industrial management as a 
service to the community." He is a 
holder of the Exchange Club's annual 
Golden Deeds Award for 1958, the Met- 
ropolitan Civic Association's Achieve- 
ment Award for 1961, and the 1961 
Heart Fund Award. 



Dr. Elkins Named 
To Committee 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the 
University, was one of nine national 
and area leaders appointed to the Ad- 
visory Committee on Finance by C. 
Darwin Stolzenbach, Administrator of 
the National Capital Transportation 
Agency. 

Dr. Elkins also serves as a member 
of the Board of Control of the Southern 
Regional Education Board, a member 
ot the Executive Committee of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, and Secretary- 
treasurer of the National Association of 
State Universities. 



Astronomy Program 
Launched 

A major research and teaching pro- 
gram in astronomy was launched at 
the University of Maryland on July 1. 

The University's Department of 
Physics has been renamed the Depart- 
ment of Physics and Astronomy, and 
academic programs leading to B.S., 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in astronomy 
will be offered. 

Director of the new program is Dr. 
S. Fred Singer, Professor of Astro- 
physics. Dr. Singer will be on leave of 
absence from the University until Sep- 
tember, 1963, and during his temporary 
absence, Dr. Howard Laster, Associate 
Chairman of the Department, will serve 
as Acting Director of the Center of 
Atmospheric and Space Physics. 

Four leading astronomers have posi- 
tions in this program. They are Pro- 
fessor and Associate Chairman for As- 
tronomy, Gart Westerhout, who has 
come from the University of Leiden, 
Holland; Professor Ernst Opik, who has 
been at Maryland since 1957; Associate 
Professor William Erickson, who will 
arrive from Convair Research Labor- 
atory and Leiden University next year; 
and Assistant Professor Uco Van Wijk, 
who came to Maryland from Princeton 
University in September, 1961. They 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



will direct research programs in radio- 
astronomy, astrophysics, planetary as- 
tronomy, solar astronomy and stellar 
dynamics. 

The National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration has recognized the im- 
portance of this program by granting 
the Department $192,000 to provide 
10 three-year traineeships for outstand- 
ing graduate students who will study 
astronomy and space physics. These 
students will be given tuition-tree sti- 
pends of $2400-$3400 per year to sup- 
port their Ph.D. studies. 



Bertha Woods Manuscripts 
are Received by the Library 

A collection of manuscripts, poems and 
articles by Bertha Cierneaux Woods, 
wife of a former President of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, has been donated 
to the University Library by her son. 

These works cover the period 1888 
to 1944 and include: 12 volumes of 
clippings from published articles, three 
bound books of poems, two pamphlets 
of verse and three handwritten manu- 
scripts. 

Mrs. Woods' husband, Dr. Albert F. 
Woods, was President of the University 
from 1917 to 1926. Their son, Mark 
W. Woods of Hyattsville, made the 
presentation. Some papers of Dr. Woods 
were included among this literature. He 
died in 1948. 

Two of the books of poems, Verses by 
Three Generations (1921) and Patient 
Scientist and Other Verses ( 1928), were 
published by the University Press, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

These materials will be housed in 
the Maryland and Rare Books Depart- 
ment at the Library. 



Dr. Weber Awarded 
Fellowship 

Dr. Joseph Weber, Professor of Physics, 
was recently granted a fellowship award 
by the John Simon Guggenheim 
Memorial Foundation for studies in the 
fields of classical and quantized general 
relativity. 

The Foundation was established in 
1925 by the late U. S. Senator Simon 
Guggenheim and by Mrs. Guggenheim 
in memory of a son, John Simon 
Guggenheim, who died as a young man 
in 1922. The fellowships are granted 
to persons of the highest capacity for 
scientific research, and to persons of 
unusual and proved creative ability in 
the fine arts. The grants are awarded 
to assist the fellows to further accom- 
plishment in their fields through carry- 
ing on studies which they have them- 
selves proposed. 




From left, Ron Grodziecki, President of the Senior Class, presents pledges from 
senior class members of $3,600 to Alvin E. Cormeny, Assistant to the /'resident foi 
Endowment and Development. The gift from the Class of '62 will he used to pur- 
chase hooks for the library when the pledges are redeemed this summer. Also par- 
ticipating in the presentation ceremony are Assistant Dean for Student Life George 
Kaludis, Kay Meyers, Senior Class Vice President. Cynthia Heisler, Associated 
Women Students representative, and Mike Benkert. Men's League representative. 




Mrs. Elmer J. Laurent of College Heights, Maryland assists Senator George D. 
Aiken with the cake cutting at the recent Centennial celebration of the signing of 
the Act establishing Land-Grant colleges by President Abraham Lincoln on July 2. 
1862. Looking on is Paul Morrill of Arlington, Virginia, a collateral descendant 
of former Senator Justin Smith Morrill of Vermont, author of the Land-Grant Act. 
The ceremony, held at National Archives, was attended by a distinguished audience 
of Ambassadors. Members of Congress, Educators and Government officials. Senator 
Aiken, who occupies the Senate seat of Senator Morrill, made the address. \frs. 
Laurent is a June graduate of the University of Maryland — a Land-Grant institu- 
tion. The cake was decorated with a map showing the location of the 68 Land-Gram 
institutions in the United States. 



July-August, 1962 



17 




Professor Cunningham 
New Dean of Law School 



Professor William P. Cunningham has 
been appointed Dean of the University 
of Maryland School of Law to succeed 
Dean Roger Howell, who retired July 1 
after 35 years of service to the Uni- 
versity. 

A graduate of Harvard Law School, 
where he was a teaching fellow for a 
year before joining the University of 
Maryland faculty in 1954, the new dean 
has held the rank of full professor since 
I960 and is now teaching federal 
taxation, corporation law, legal account- 
ing, and a seminar in current tax prob- 
lems. 

Professor Cunningham was born in 
Boston. He attended Phillips Exeter 
Academy and was graduated from Har- 
vard College, where he was elected to 
membership in Phi Beta Kappa. 

He was admitted to the Massachusetts 
bar in 1949 and practiced law in Boston 
for five years. He was admitted to the 
Maryland bar in 1954 and has been 
active in the Maryland State Bar Asso- 
ciation; since 1960 he has served as 
its Executive Director as well as Di- 
rector of its Committee on Continuing 
Education of the Bar. 



He is also a member of the American 
Bar Association and its Section on Tax- 
ation, the Bar Association of Baltimore 
City, the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors, and the Order of the 
Coif, honorary law fraternity. 

Professor Cunningham has contrib- 
uted articles to law reviews and served 
as General Editor of a series of seven 
Maryland Basic Practice Handbooks, 
published by the Maryland State Bar 
Association and the Junior Bar Asso- 
ciation of Baltimore City. 

He resides in Lutherville with his 
wife, son and daughter. 



Awarded SGA Plaques 

Robert J. McCartney, Director of Uni- 
versity Relations, Dr. Norman Laffer, 
Associate Professor of Microbiology, 
and Dr. Charles Manning, Acting Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
were presented faculty-staff award 
plaques at the Student Government As- 
sociation Convocation Tuesday, May 
22, at Ritchie Coliseum. 

The awards were given in recognition 
of outstanding services rendered to the 
student body during the 1961-62 school 
year. 



Chemistry Alumni Meet 

The alumni of the Department of 
Chemistry held two luncheons recently 
in connection with the national meet- 
ing of the American Chemical Society 
in Washington, D. C. Dr. Charles E. 
White, Chairman of the Department, 
outlined the growth of the University 
and the development of the Department. 
The luncheons were arranged by Dr. 
William J. Bailey, Research Professor 
of Organic Chemistry at the University. 



AFROTC Winners Named 

Winner of the Governor's Cup, offered 
each year by His Excellency, the Gov- 
ernor of Maryland, to the best drilled 



squadron within the Corps of Cadets 
at annual AFROTC Day at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland on May 16, was 
Squadron 131, commanded by Cadet 
Major Stephen L. Bennett. The award 
was presented by Dr. Thomas B. 
Symons of the Board of Regents of the 
University. 

Recipient of the Scabbard and Blade 
Coblentz Memorial Cup, presented each 
year to the most outstanding group 
within the Corps of Cadets, was Group 
VI, with Cadet Major Thomas S. 
Schammel as Commander. Mr. B. 
Herbert Brown, Secretary of the Board 
of Regents, made the presentation. 

The Alumni Cup, offered each year 
to the best drilled flight within the 
Corps of Cadets, was won by Flight C, 
Squadron 64, commanded by Cadet 1st 
Lt. M. D. Boyd and was presented by 
David L. Brigham, Director of Alumni 
Relations. 

Cadet Colonel Paul I. Bowen, Jr., 
was presented the Air Force Association 
Award, a silver medal presented each 
year to the outstanding advanced 
AFROTC cadet based on scholastic 
grade, both general and military, in- 
dividual characteristics and performance 
at summer camp. Presentation was 
made by George D. Hardy, National 
Secretary of the Air Force Association. 

Robert J. McCartney, Director of 
University Relations, presented three 
awards: The Sun Newspaper Award, 
offered to the best drilled sophomore 
cadet with the Corps of Cadets, to 
Cadet Larry P. Klipp; The Chicago 
Tribune AFROTC Gold Medal Award, 
presented annually to two sophomores 
who are in the top 10 per cent of their 
leadership and other AFROTC classes, 
who possess strong moral character 
befitting a potential Air Force officer 
and who have expressed a desire for an 
Air Force commission, to Cadet Lieu- 
tenant Harry R. Blacksten and Cadet 
Thomas L. Hranicka; and The Chicago 
Tribune AFROTC Silver Medal 
Awards, presented annually to two 
freshmen who are in the top 10 per 
cent of their AFROTC classes, have 
strong moral character and who have 
expressed a desire for an Air Force 
commission, to Cadet Anthony E. 
Maione and Cadet Lt. John M. Georgi. 



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18 



the Maryland Magazine 



Investigating the Fever Caused by Typhoid Infection 



A step toward understanding how ty- 
phoid lever produces its wracking fever 
and pain was announced recently by 

tour University of Maryland researchers 
in a paper presented by Dr. Sheldon E. 
Greisman at the 75th Annual Meeting 
of the Association oi American Phy- 
sicians in Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

Dr. Cireisman's work was performed 
in collaboration with Dr. Richard B. 
Hornick, Assistant Professor of Med- 
icine, Frank A. Carozza, a medical stu- 
dent, and Dr. Theodore E. Woodward, 
Professor and Head of the Department 
of Medicine, who directs the work. 

The University of Maryland studies, 
which have been under way for several 
years, are being conducted on prison 
volunteers at the Maryland House of 
Correction at Jessup. They are being 
performed with the collaboration and 
sponsorship of one of the Commissions 
of the Armed Forces Epidemiological 
Board. The work that Dr. Greisman is 
reporting is only one study of this series. 
To test the theory that the human 
subject will soon develop tolerance to 
endotoxin when it is given him con- 
tinuously and after several days injec- 
tions of the non-living chemical will 
no longer produce the symptoms of 
typhoid fever, while active typhoid 
fever, caused by living bacteria, makes 
the patient ill for two weeks or more 



U.S. A IK I OKU PHOTO 




Lt. Colonel Louis W . Berger, who was 
recently appointed Superintendent of 
Building Services at the University of 
Maryland, is being a wended the first 
Oak Leaf Cluster to the Air Force Com- 
mendation Medal at ceremonies mark- 
ing his retirement from the Air Force 
after over 20 years of active duty. The 
award was made by Brigadier General 
F. L. Vidal, Commander of the Second 
Air Force Reserve Region at Andrews 
Air Force Base. 



and he cannot throw oil these effects, 
thus indicating that the disease is medi- 
ated h\ circulating endotoxins. Dr. 
Greisman made volunteers tolerant to 
endotoxins by repeated daily injections 

for a week or more. He then gave these 
subjects a dose of living typhoid genus 
His studies showed the opposite ol the 
reasonable conclusion that il endotoxin 
had been producing the actual mani- 
festations of typhoid fever, then the 
living bacteria would not make the sub- 
jects ill alter they hail developed toler- 
ance. He found that the subjects got just 
as sick as if they had not developed 
tolerance to the endotoxin. 

"Nature is not often foolish. "Dr. 
Greisman says. "Hut in this instance, 
nature does seem foolish — when the 
patient is acutely ill, and needs tolerance 
to the endotoxin, he loses it, but can 
develop it again when he gets well." 

Human subjects are used in these 
studies because no experimental animal 
has been found susceptible to typhoid 
infection, with the exception of the 
chimpanzee, which develops only a mild 
illness that does not even require anti- 
biotic treatment. 

The human studies offer very little 
risk or discomfort to the volunteers 
because antibiotics control the infec- 
tion within days as contrasted to weeks 
in the natural disease. 



Berger Heads 
Building Services 

Louis W. Berger, A & S, '32, who re- 
tired in April as a Lieutenant Colonel 
in the U. S. Air Force, after more than 
20 years of service, has been appointed 
Superintendent of Building Services at 
the University. 

Colonel Berger, who lives at 4308 
Clearbrook Lane, Kensington, Mary- 
land, entered active duty with the Army 
Air Corps in February, 1942, after a 
notable career in amateur and pro- 
fessional athletics that led to his elec- 
tion to the Maryland State Hall of Fame 
and to the Helms Foundation for 
Basketball Hall of Fame. An Ail-Ameri- 
can basketball star with the University 
of Maryland 1931 and 1932 teams, he 
also made All-American for his base- 
ball exploits with the 1932 Maryland 
team. 

His athletic career began with Tech- 
nical High School, Washington, D.C., 
where he was elected to the all-high- 
school team for the District of Colum- 
bia in basketball, baseball and football. 
In 1931 he won the "Best Athlete 
Award" at the University and Mary- 
land's "Citizenship Award" in 1932. 

(Continued on next page) 



MC 



i i 



UNIQUE CAREER 

OPPORTUNITIES 

WITH 

Westinghouse 

"THE ENGINEER'S 
COMPANY" 



At Westinghouse you'll be en- 
gaged in research and develop- 
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other challenging fields. You'll 
have at your disposal the finest 
company owned facilities, and 
you'll be associated with some of 
the nation's outstanding engineers 
and scientists. You'll be encour- 
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Air Arm Ordnance 

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Astroelectronics 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




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July- August, 1962 



19 



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NA 8-8140 



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they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
SCHLUDERBERG-KURDLE CO., INC. 



Look for the Sign 




Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

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American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service And Products 
928 EYE STREET. N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

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After receiving his degree in Economics, 
he played professional baseball with the 
Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, 
and the Boston Red Sox until his entry 
on active duty in 1942. 

He was assigned as Director of Ad- 
ministrative Services for Headquarters. 
Second Air Force Reserve Region at 
Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, 
upon its activation in August, 1960, and 
remained in that post until his retire- 
ment on March 30. 

In addition to the Air Force Com- 
mendation Medal with one Oak Leaf 
Cluster, his military decorations include 
the Bronze Star Medal and the Army 
Commendation Medal. 

IHOMAS STARCHER 




In ceremonies at the Ethel Barrymore 
Theatre in New York, May 5, Miss 
Olivia deHavilland, twice winner of the 
motion picture academy award "Oscar," 
became the second honorary member 
of the University of Maryland Drama 
Wing. In the above photo, Judy Lanier 
of Drama Wing is shown pinning the 
organization's emblem on the motion 
picture actress. Miss deHavilland is now 
appearing on Broadway with Henry 
Fonda in "A Gift of Time". Broadway 
actress Julie Harris became the first 
honorary member in I960. 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 



A. B. Hamilton 



Superior Service Awards 

The United States Department of Agri- 
culture Superior Service Award is the 
"Oscar" of the Department. Maryland 
claims two of the recently honored 
people. 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



Serving the medical profession for over 40 
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Parking Facilities Available 



Student s Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones GRanite 4-6565 



Charles E. Burkhead received the 
award for "outstanding technical com- 
petence and resourcefulness in planning 
crop estimating programs.'' Burkhead 
was in charge oi the Maryland office ol 
Statistical Reporting Service lor several 
years before being transferred to Wash 
ington. 

Dr. Peter H. Hein/e received his 
Ph.D. degree in plant physiology from 
the Universitj of Maryland in 1940. 
lie received the award lor his research 
in horticultural crops. 



Hearn Insurance Supervisor 

Richard Hearn. '53. has been promoted 
by State Farm Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany to Property Claim Supervisor lor 
their Eastern Division. 



Daugherty Advanced 

Charles G. Daugherty, '57, has been 
promoted to District Salesman by the 
McMillen Feed Division of Central 
Soya. He will be responsible lor the 
states of Maryland, Delaware and New 
Jersey. 

Haig Retires 

Professor Fred "Doug" M. Haig, 'IS. 
has retired from North Carolina State 
College where he was a member of the 
Animal Industry Department for 42 
years. 

At Maryland he was on the dairy and 
poultry judging teams, was ranking stu- 
dent cadet officer in R.O.T.C., graduated 
with honors and received the James 
Goddard Memorial Gold Medal for 
scholarship. 

To keep young in his retirement, he 
will continue some of his hobbies which 
include the raising of Registered Boston 
Terriers and Dorset Sheep. 



College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Personal Notes 

Captain Donald E. Covell, '40, received 
the United States Air Force Commen- 
dation Medal at Lajes Field, Azores, in 
recognition of his meritorious service at 
the USAF Hospital. Orlando AFB, 
Florida. 

Army Reserve Specialist Four Arthur 
V. Teagarden, '54, completed the supply 
and parts specialist course at The Trans- 

{Continucd on next page) 



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21 



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portation School at Fort Eustis, Vir- 
ginia, on April 6. Specialist Teagarden 
was trained to maintain stock records 
and to identify, issue, store and receipt 
Transportation Corps supplies, equip- 
ment and replacement parts. Teagarden 
is regularly assigned to the 313th Trans- 
portation Battalion's Headquarters Com- 
pany, an Army Reserve unit which was 
recalled to active duty and assigned to 
Fort Eustis. 

Captain Arthur C. Weiner, '55, was 
reassigned to Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, 
following his graduation from the 
United States Air Force Squadron Offi- 
cer School at Maxwell AFB, Alabama, 
on April 13. 

Fredric L. Miller, '61, who was com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
United States Air Force upon gradua- 
tion from Officers Training School at 
Lackland AFB, Texas, has entered the 
Air Force pilot training course at Reese 
AFB, Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Wylie Hopkins, Jr., 
are the parents of a new daughter, 
Adrienne Chesvey Hopkins, born April 
20, 1962. Mr. Hopkins, B.P.A., '42, and 
LL.B., '57, is married to the former 
Robin Ann Chesvey. The Hopkins have 
one other daughter. 

Mathematics Series 

Publication of a major series of vol- 
umes on mathematics will begin during 
the winter under the joint sponsorship 
of the University of Maryland and 
RIAS, the Martin Company's basic re- 
search institute in Baltimore. 

The series, entitled "Contributions to 
Differential Equations," will be pub- 
lished by Interscience Publishers, a divi- 
sion of John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 

The managing editor is Joseph P. 
LaSalle, of RIAS. Other members of the 
Managing Board of Editors are Leon 
W. Cohen, head of the Department of 
Mathematics, University of Maryland; 
Monroe H. Martin, director of the In- 
stitute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics, University of Maryland; 
and Solomon Lefschetz, director of the 
RIAS center for Differential Equations 
and former chairman of the Princeton 
University Department of Mathematics. 

The editors for the series are J. B. 
Diaz, Alexander Weinstein and Avron 
Douglis, of the University of Maryland; 
J. K. Hale, of RIAS; Lawrence Markus, 
of the University of Minnesota; and 
Edward Nelson, of Princeton. 

The series will be published first in 
soft-cover journal-form, with each issue 
approximately 127 pages in length, and 
then as hard-cover books, each contain- 
ing four issues, plus indexes. The first 
bound volume is scheduled for publica- 
tion near the end of the year; the first 
of the journals is expected out during 
the spring. Interscience is now process- 
ing papers for the first volume, which 
may be obtained by subscription. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Named TV Producer 

Barry Wiseman, '58, formerly a tele- 
vision director with WBAL-TV, is now 
a TV producer in the Baltimore office 
of W. B. Doner and Company, Ad- 
vertising. 

While on the College Park campus, 
Wiseman was S.Ci.A. Treasurer and 
active in University Theatre. He lives in 
Baltimore with his wife, the former 
Ruth Zermon. They have one child. 
Jelfrey, one year old. 

Processing Manager 

Richard H. Maiirer, '36, is the new 
Los Angeles district data processing 
manager for Burroughs Corporation in 
Los Angeles, California. Prior to his 
appointment, Maurer was a special 
management representative at the home 
office in Detroit, Michigan. 

After he was graduated with a B.A. 
in history and economics at the Uni- 
versity, Maurer joined Burroughs as a 
salesman and has since been an office 
manager, dealer sales manager, regional 
sales promotion representative, regional 
manager and U.S. and international 
sales promotion representative. 

Alumni In Roster 

University of Maryland alumni The- 
odore H. Erbe, A & S, '36, of Travelers 
Insurance Company of Baltimore, and 
James S. Furst, Mil. Sci., '58, of the 
John Hancock Mutual Company of 
Washington, are listed in the 1962 
Roster of the Million Dollar Table of 
the National Association of Life Under- 
writers. Every member of the 1962 
Round Table must have sold at least a 
million dollars of life insurance in 1961 
or else have met strict requirements for 
Life membership by his sales in prior 
years. 

Language Lectureship Program 

The new Foreign Language Building 
was officially inaugurated last April 26 
by President Wilson H. Elkins, who 
opened the Foreign Language Depart- 
ment lectureship series. Dr. Douglas 
W. Alden, Head of the Department, 
introduced Professor Henri Peyre of 
Yale University, who spoke in English 
on "Rousseau Today." 

Later lectures included one in Spanish 
on "Cervantes and Poetry" by Professor 
Eugenio Florit of Barnard College, 
another in English on "Heinrich von 
Kleist, the Poet as Prussian," by Pro- 
fessor Sigurd Burckhardt, Ohio State 
University and one in French by M. 
Maurice Coindreau, Professor Emeritus 
of Princeton, who, as the leading trans- 
lator of contemporary American novels 
into French, spoke on "The Influence 

(Continued on next page) 



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of American Literature on Contem- 
porary French Literature." The series, 
which was well attended, was open to 
the public. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A holt 



Awards and Honors 

Dr. Daniel Prescott, Director Emeritus 
of the Institute for Child Study and 
Professor of Education, was recently 
named a "Partner in 4-H"' along with a 
group of eight men and two women for 
their contributions to 4-H Club work. 
This recognition is made annually dur- 
ing the National 4-H Club Conference 
to public-spirited donors who give gen- 
erously of themselves to challenge 
4-H'ers and leaders to greater achieve- 
ment. 

Dr. Prescott was also selected for a 
Fulbright scholarship to lecture in 
Australia during the coming year. He 
will be at Victoria Training College in 
Melbourne where his book The Child in 
the Educated Process is being used in 
the teacher education program. In con- 
nection with this scholarship he will 
participate in a lecture tour to all the 
Australian states which is being organ- 
ized by the New Education Fellowship. 

Mrs. Helen Garstens, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Mathematics, 
has been selected as a member of a team 
of 15 mathematicians and mathematics 
educators from the United States to 
work on mathematics curriculum mate- 
rials for grades K-12 from the English- 
speaking school children of Tropical 
Africa. The team will probably be sta- 
tioned in Kampala, Uganda, for a 
period of two months during this sum- 
mer. 

Doctoral degrees were received by 
Richard L. Matteson, Instructor in the 
Institute for Child Study, from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and by J. David 
Lockard, Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion and Botany, from Pennsylvania 
State University at the June commence- 
ments. 

Meetings and Professional 
Contributions 

The theme of the Seventh Annual Mary- 
land Education Conference sponsored 
by the College of Education and the 
University College at the University of 
Maryland was "Quality Teachers in 
Quality Education." Dr. Orval L. Ulry, 
Professor of Education, presided at the 
meeting; Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice 
President for Academic Affairs, wel- 
comed the group to the University. The 




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24 



the Maryland Magazine 



following participated in a panel discus- 
sion on the theme of the conference: 
Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of the 
College of Education; Miss Mary A. 
Adams, Assistant Superintendent of Ele- 
mentary Education in the Baltimore City 
Schools; Dr. James A. Sensenbaugh, 
Superintendent of Schools, Frederick 
County; and Dr. John Walton, (hair- 
man o( the Department of Education, 
Johns Hopkins University. 

Dr. Jean Hebeler, Assistant Professor 
of Education and Coordinator of Spe- 
cial Education, is President-Elect of the 
Division on Teacher Education of the 
National Council of Exceptional Chil- 
dren. She was also elected as a member 
of the Program Committee of NCEC 
to plan the program for the 1463 con- 
vention and as a fellow to the American 
Association on Mental Deficiency. 

Dr. Richard Byrne, Professor of Ed- 
ucation, was the main speaker of the 
Guidance Work Shop held by the Public 
Schools of the District of Columbia, De- 
partments of Guidance and Placement. 
He presented, "The Scope of the Guid- 
ance Program in the Elementary 
Schools, Junior, Senior, and Vocational 
High Schools." 

Dr. Robert Risinger, Professor of Ed- 
ucation, presented "Trends in the Social 
Studies Programs of Secondary Schools" 
to a Social Science Workshop in Hous- 
ton, Texas, sponsored by Texas South- 
ern University and served as consultant 
to this Workshop. He also served as 
consultant to a social studies curriculum 
committee in revising the social studies 
program in United States History for 
Caroline County and presented "Careers 
in Education" at the Howard County 
High School Career Day. He addressed 
the fifteenth Annual Motor Fleet Ve- 
hicles Supervisor's Conference at the 
University of Maryland on "Self Im- 
provement for the Supervisor." 

Dr. Orval Ulry, Professor of Educa- 
tion and Director of Summer School, 
presented "Education in the Sixties — 
New Developments" to the Connecticut 
Park School PTA at their annual ban- 
quet. 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean of 
the College of Education, served as a 
member of the committee to audit the 
ballots for the Association of Higher 
Education election which was chaired 
by James L. McCaskill, Assistant Exec- 
utive Secretary for Federal Education 
Relations of the National Education 
Association. 

Dr. Henry Mendeloff, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Foreign Lan- 
guages, presented to the Club De Las 
Americas, "Un Analisis Linguistico de 
un Texto Medieval Espanol." 

Publications 

Dr. Gladys S. Wiggin, Professor of 
Education, is author of the book recent- 

(Continued on next page) 




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25 






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ly released by McGraw Hill Book Co., 
Education and Nationalism. 

Dr. Richard H. Byrne, Professor 01 
Education, authored the article, "What 
School Counseling Is," which appeared 
in Guidance Practices, published by 
Chronicle Guidance Publications, Inc. 

Dr. Hugh V. Perkins, Professor of 
Education, Institute for Child Study, 
authored the article "Nongraded Pro- 
grams: What Progress?" which appears 
in Educational Leadership, December 
1961 issue. 

Alumni News 

Margaret C. Zimmerman, '41, has been 
named a vice president of Executive Se- 
lective Division, John Orr Young & As- 
sociates, Inc., New York City. Miss 
Zimmerman is believed to be the first 
woman executive in the management 
consulting field engaged in the selection 
of male executives for major industrial 
and service corporations. 

Robert J. Messersmith, B.S., '55, 
member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, 
has graduated from the United States 
Air Force Squadron Officer School in 
Maxwell, Alabama, and been reassigned 
to the Dover Air Force Base in Dela- 
ware. 

Robert H. Schuler, Jr., B.S. '60, of 
Elmira, New York, a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega Fraternity, following grad- 
uation from the advanced tactical fight- 
er course at Nellis Air Force Base, Ne- 
vada, is being assigned to Cannon Air 
Force Base in Nevada. Mr. Schuler is 
married to Gayle Frazier, formerly of 
College Park, Maryland. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

R. M. Ginnings 

J. Albert Miller Honored 

Mr. J. Albert Miller, recipient of one of 
the first degrees to be given in electrical 
engineering from the old Maryland 
Agricultural College, was honored at a 
May 9 meeting of the PTA of the 
Hyattsville Junior High School upon 
his retirement as principal of that 
school. Mr. Miller retired at the end of 
this past school year after 47 years of 
service in education in Maryland. 

After Maryland Agricultural College, 
Mr. Miller went on to Columbia and 
Johns Hopkins Universities and re- 
ceived a master's degree in education 
from George Washington University. 

Mr. Miller has been teaching in the 
Maryland School System since receiving 
his master's degree. In 1933 he was 
made principal of the Hyattsville Senior 
High School, where he also taught 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



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classes in senior mathematics, When the 
Hyattsville High School became .1 
junior high school 111 1951, Mr. Millei 
stayed on as its principal. 

John I). MORRIS \v 1 1 11 1 111 
i'i ws 1 ! 1 v \m\ Rah road 

John I). Morris, '26. has been appointed 

director, special services, of the Penn 

sylvania Railroad. Previously, he was 

regional manager ol the Chesapeake 

Region, at Baltimore. As director ol 

special services he will be responsible 
for continuing research in the general 
transportation field, including the direc- 
tion of activities and studies about sub- 
urban services oi the Pennsylvania Kail 
road. 

At this time he will head up lor the 
Pennsylvania Railroad the coordination 
of studies with representatives of the 
New York Central to develop a sug- 
gested plan of operation for the pro- 
posed new Pennsylvania-New York 
Central Transportation Company, and 
to assist in determining the economies 
that can be produced. 

Corcoran Receives 
Honorary Degree 

Ptofessor George F. Corcoran, head of 
the Electrical Engineering Department, 
received the honorary degree of doctor 
of science from South Dakota State 
College at commencement exercises in 
Brookings, South Dakota, on June 4. 

Professor Corcoran, a native of Red- 
field, South Dakota, was graduated from 
State College in 1923. He earned a 
master's degree from the University of 
Minnesota in 1926. 



School of 

LAW 



New Director of STC 

T. Hammond Welsh, Jr., '35, was 
elected a Director of the Suburban 
Trust Company at a recent meeting of 
the Company, it was reported by T. 
Howard Duckett, Chairman of the 
Board and Executive Committee, and 
J. Robert Sherwood, President of the 
Company. 

Mr. Welsh is Vice Chairman of the 
Board and General Counsel for Hyatts- 
ville Building Association: Maryland 
counsel for Levitt and Sons, Inc.; and 
is a senior law partner in the firm of 
Welsh and Lancaster in Hyattsville. He 
is a member of the bar of the State of 
Maryland and the District of Columbia 
and is a member of the American Bar 
Association, Prince Georges County 
Bar Association and the District of 
Columbia Bar Association. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Alumna in the Congo 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bowers and two 
children of Baltimore are among four 
married couples of Phoenix, Arizona, 
who flew into Leopoldville, Congo, in 
January to begin a two-year assignment 
as teachers for the Congo Polytechnic 
Institute. Their mission is to train semi- 
educated Congolese ranging in age from 
18 to 35 primarily in the modern tech- 
niques in agriculture. 

Mrs. Bowers, a 1944 graduate of the 
University Law School, and an earlier 
graduate in political science, practiced 
law for four years. An honor graduate, 
she edited the Maryland Law Review, 
and is a member of Phi Delta Delta, 
legal fraternity, and is listed in Who's 
Who of American Women. 

Lecture Series 

"The Lawyer in Public Life" was the 
title of the first in a series of lectures 
presented recently to the student body 
of the University of Maryland School 
of Law, by Theodore R. McKeldin, '25. 

Mr. McKeldin told the students that 
a young man just entering the Law pro- 
fession has a choice between public or 
private service. "Let me say right now 
that I do not believe that he is under any 
moral obligation either way," he said. 
"As for me, I have chosen to spend a 
great deal of my active career in public 
service, but I do not pretend to be par- 
ticularly virtuous on that account. Pri- 
vate practice may be just as honorable 
and useful. It is a matter of tempera- 
ment, a question of what a man desires 
to get out of life. 

"Everyone hopes to achieve success 
through his profession, no matter what 
profession it may be," he stated. "It is 
according to what is your measure of 
success that you ought, or ought not, as 
a lawyer, to proceed from private prac- 
tice into public service." 

Wealth is one measure of success, he 
said, and in a capitalistic society, a 
legitimate one. "If a man can acquire 
wealth through the practice of law," he 
said, "he has every legal and moral 
right to do so on the sole condition that 
he adhere scrupulously to the ethics of 
the profession. Social eminence is an 
equally legitimate aspiration. But if that 
is what a young lawyer wishes to ac- 
complish in the world, public service is 
not for him. It is not and can never be 
economically profitable. Nor does it 
offer a return in social popularity — 
rather the reverse." It is inevitable in a 
democracy such as ours for the man in 
public life to offend some for whose 
character he has the highest respect and 
whose good opinion he values, Mr. Mc- 
Keldin said. If public life is not the 
way for a lawyer to gain wealth and 
not the way to gain universal popularity, 
intelligent men go into this type of life 
because to these men, wealth and popu- 
larity are only secondary values, he said. 



2H 



the Maryland Magazine 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Important Resident Publications 
from the School oh Medicine 

Doctors Steven Borsanyi and Cyrus I.. 
Blanchard published their account of 
their researches in the use of computers 
in auditory investigation. Doctors Harry 
M. Robinson, Jr., Joan Raskin, and 
William Dunseath have pioneered in the 
use of a new treatment for certain skin 
inflammations. 

An editorial in the Bulletin of the 
School of Medicine, complemented by a 
report from the Walter Reed General 
Hospital in Washington, points to the 
increasing prevalence of syphilis, out- 
lining certain reasons for the reappear- 
ance of the disease, and suggesting 
methods for increased effective control. 

Doctor George Entwisle, Professor ot 
Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation, 
has announced the approval of a train- 
ing program in physical medicine and 
rehabilitation. 

Dean's Letter 

Dean Stone has called attention to the 
relative decrease in the number of qual- 
ified applicants to the Medical Schools 
in the United States citing certain facts 
possibly influencing the decline in the 
number of eligible applicants. Doctor 
Stone concludes with a statement in 
support of the Harris Bill (H.R. 4999), 
introduced in the current session of 
Congress providing for medical scholar- 
ships as well as aid to medical educa- 
tion. 



School of 

NURSING 



Joan White 



Membership in Alumnae 
Association 

Membership in the Nurses Alumnae 
Association has been extended to all 
nursing graduates who have received 
their baccalaureate degree in nursing or 
a higher degree related to nursing from 
the University of Maryland School of 
Nursing. Prior to this invitation, only 
those graduates receiving their basic 
nursing education from the University 
of Maryland were eligible for member- 
ship. All nursing graduates are encour- 
aged to contribute their ideas and to 
become active members of their Alum- 
nae Association. 

(Continued on next page) 



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VICTOR 

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COLONIAL FACE 

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WILLIAMSPORT. MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAM AM ST., N.E. 
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Sales Representatives in 
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PARK 
TRANSFER 
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Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 
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The 

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Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
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WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

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SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Personal Notes 

Class of 1921: 

Mrs. Jessie Rhodes Miller and Miss 
Ruby Reister have been with the 
Ashville County Health Department 
in Ashville, North Carolina for 25 
years. 

Class of 1932: 

Mrs. Julia Thompson Harris plans to do 
some nursing in Charlotte, North 
Carolina. Her husband passed away 
on July 10, 1960. 

Class of 1936: 

Mrs. Beryl Smith Thomas returned to 
her home town of Marlington, West 
Virginia with her two children in 
1958 following the death of her 
father. Mrs. Thomas is employed as 
a staff nurse at the local 45-bed hos- 
pital, Pocahontas Memorial Hospital. 

Class of 1939: 

Mrs. James B. Nuttall, formerly Virginia 
Belle Richardson, and her husband, 
Colonel Nuttall, have been living in 
Los Angeles, California, since July, 
1961 where Colonel Nuttall is sta- 
tioned. 

Class of 1942: 

Mrs. Helen Pauline Cope Ackerson and 
her husband, Major E. L. Ackerson, 
are now living in Anchorage, Alaska. 
Major Ackerson is stationed at El- 
mendorf A.F.B. 

Class of 1949: 

Mrs. Gloria Nestor Smith has been liv- 
ing in Fort Lauderdale, Florida and 
working in "our own drug store" for 
over six years. 

Class of 1952: 

Mrs. Ethel Sellers Henderson resigned 
her position as Head of the Depart- 
ment of Nursing at the Central Mis- 
souri State College in Warrensburg, 
Missouri, in March, 1961. She plans 
to spend another year at Columbia 
University, after which, the State of 
Florida. 

Mrs. Shirley Workman Shanahan and 
her husband, Lt. Commander Tom 
Shanahan, are now residing on Lynn- 
haven Inlet near Norfolk, Virginia. 

Class of 1953: 

Mrs. Dorothea Fenwick Fraleigh had 
been doing office and some school 
nursing until her "retirement" with 
her four children, Dorothea Lillie, 
born on April 14, 1961, Peter, seven, 
Donna, five, and James, three. 

Class of 1955: 

Mrs. Claudette Kantz Craig is now liv- 
ing in San Diego, California, where 
her husband is stationed at the NAS 
Miramar flying Jet Aircraft. In their 
three years of marriage, they have 
lived in Florida, Texas, Tennessee, 
and Northern California. 

(lass of 1960: 

Mrs. L. Gwendolyn Taylor Rodney is 
employed by the Wayne County 
Health Department in Goldsboro, 
North Carolina. 



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BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



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distributed by 
BON TON FOOD PRODUCTS 

801 Franklin St., N.E. 
HU 3-4232 Washington 




Give To Fight Cancer ! 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



Class of 1961: 

Mrs. Georgia Masser Boycc is employed 
as a staff nurse in pediatrics at the 
Frederick Memorial Hospital in Fred- 
erick, Maryland. 
Mrs. Helen Gates Dearborn was em- 
ployed in the Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital in Providence. Rhode 
Island, from July 10 to November 10, 
1961 while her husband attended 
Officer Candidate School in Newport, 
Rhode Island. 
Miss Patricia Lee Ashburn is employed 
as a public health nurse by the Balti- 
more City Health Department. 
Mrs. Eila Filbey Hogans is employed 
by Union Memorial Hospital in Balti- 
more, Maryland- 
Mrs. Mary Ahalt Barker is employed 
by the Prince George's County 
Health Department. 



School of 

PHARMACY 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 
Dr. B. Olive Cole 




MASSEY- FERGUSON, INC 

BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 



Look For our Local Dealer in Your Community 



Annual Banquet and Dance 

The Thirty-Seventh Annual Banquet and 
Dance of the School of Pharmacy of 
the University of Maryland was held in 
the Student Union of the professional 
schools of the University on June 7. 

Three hundred and eighty persons 
attended, including the graduates of 
1962, and their ladies or escorts, who 
were guests of the Alumni Association. 
In addition, many parents and members 
of the families of the graduates attended 
— some seventy in number. 

The invocation and benediction were 
pronounced by the Reverend H. Kear- 
ney Jones, Pastor, St. James Episcopal 
Church, Baltimore. 

President James P. Cragg, Jr., wel- 
comed the graduates, parents, members 
of the faculty, alumni, guests and 
friends, and introduced Mr. David L. 
Brigham, Director of Alumni Relations 
of the University of Maryland. 

Mr. Brigham, who has been active 
at the University of Maryland in alum- 
ni affairs for many years, introduced 
the guests, mentioning characterises 
and anecdotes concerning many of them 
as they were presented. 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice-Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs, brought 
greetings from the University of Mary- 
land and Dr. George F. Archambault. 
President of the American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association, and principal speaker 
at the Convocation preceding the ban- 
quet, brought greetings from the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association. 

Dr. Charles W. Bliven of Washing- 
ton greeted the group in the name of 

(Continued on next page) 



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July-August, J 962 



31 



the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy. He is the Executive Sec- 
retary of that Association. 

Dr. Noel E. Foss. Dean of the School 
oi Pharmacy, who received the Ph.D. 
ree from the University of Maryland 
through the School of Pharmacy, was 
presented by Mr. Francis S. Balassone, 
who enumerated the many activities and 
accomplishments of Dr. Foss and pre- 
sented him with a medal, citing him as 
the Honored Alumnus for 1962. 

Dr. John F. Wannenwetsch gave ap- 
propriate statements of the ability and 
worth of Mr. Simon Solomon as a phar- 
macist and alumnus, and also expressed 
his appreciation of Mr. Solomon as a 
long-time personal friend, after which 
h( introduced him as the recipient of 
the Honorary President's Award. 

In turn, Mr. Solomon addressed the 
candidates for graduation, stressing in 
particular the opportunities they had 
enjoyed as students, and their obligations 
and responsibilities as pharmacists and 
members of the Alumni Association. 

Dean Foss presented the members of 
the graduating class and mentioned 
honors and prizes many of them had re- 
ceived from the School of Pharmacy. 
The President of the class of 1962 — 
Sydney H. Hamet — responded in terms 
of pleasure and appreciation. 

Special certificates denoting gradu- 
ation fifty years ago from the School 
oi Pharmacy were presented to the fol- 
lowing by President Cragg: Mrs. Carrie 
Mossop Phillips, Robert R. Pierce, Fred- 
erick Minder, Lloyd N. Richardson, 
John A. Strevig and Daniel A. Warren. 

Certificates will also be sent to others 
who graduated in 1912 but were unable 
to attend. 

Reunions and members of other clas- 
ses were recognized, especially a grad- 
uate of 1912, Benjamin Klein, and Wil- 
liam J. Lowry, a graduate of the Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy in 1896. 

The officers for 1962-63 were in- 
stalled, with Samuel A. Goldstein as 
President and Miss Georgianna Sim- 
mons Gittinger as Honorary President. 

Mr. James P. Cragg, Jr., was pre- 
sented with the Past President's Award 
— a plaque — by President Goldstein. 

The beautiful flowers decorating the 
tables were by Hahn & Hahn in memory 
of Doctors Charles C. Neal, E. Frank 
Kelly and Andrew G. DuMez. 

Cigars were donated by Shafer Pfaff 
and ice cream by Hendler. 

Music lor the dinner and dance was 
furnished by Herman Bloom and his 
orchestra. 

The many expressions of commenda- 
tion and praise by those in attendance 
give heart and purpose to the officers 
and committees lor 1962-63 to plan and 
work for the routine and happy affairs 
of the Alumni Association. 



Alumni Meeting 

The annual meeting of the Alumni As- 
sociation of the School of Pharmacy of 
the University of Maryland was held 
at 8 p.m. on May 12 in the Student 
Union Building on Lombard Street. 

President James P. Cragg, Jr., wel- 
comed members and friends and gave 
a short resume of the activities of the 
year, expressing appreciation at having 
served, as President, with cooperative 
committees which successfully planned 
and executed the many affairs of the 
year. He particularly mentioned the 
Alumni Bulletin of the Association 
which has been published four times 
since January, 1961, by Milton A. 
Friedman and Nathan I. Gruz editors. 

Dean Noel E. Foss expressed the 
appreciation of the School for the con- 
tinued support of the Association in 
providing $400 annually to secure a like 
amount from the American Foundation 
for Pharmaceutical Education for tu- 
ition for undergraduate students, and 
also mentioned grants which had been 
received for research. 

Executive Secretary Frank J. Slama 
read communications from members 
and organizations. 

H. Nelson Warfield gave the annual 
report of the treasurer, which showed 
a healthy increase in finances, including 
money from the Souvenir Program of 
the party held on February 22 and con- 
tributions for the Scholarship Fund. The 
treasurer's report was audited by Mrs. 
Frank M. Budacz, Frank L. Black and 
John F. Wannenwetsch. 

The following reports were received 
from the Chairmen of Standing Com- 
mittees: Executive Committee, Irving 
I. Cohen; General Chairman, Samuel 
A. Goldstein; Souvenir Program Com- 
mittee, Harold Levin; Ticket Commit- 
tee, Milton J. Brownstein; Public Rela- 
tions Committee, Nathan I. Gruz; En- 
tertainment Committee, Ernest Snellin- 
ger; Place and Arrangement Committee, 
Samuel A. Goldstein; Publications Com- 
mittee, B. Olive Cole; Deceased Mem- 
bers Committee, Francis S. Balassone; 
Careers in Pharmacy Committee, H. 
Nelson Warfield; Student Aid and 
Scholarship Committee, Samuel I. 
Raichlen; Membership and Dues Com- 
mittee, Thomas Dawson; Kelly Me- 
morial Committee, Simon Solomon. 

The Committee on Honored Alum- 
nus, John F. Wannenwetsch, Chairman, 
reported that Dean Noel E. Foss had 
been chosen as the Honored Alumnus 
for 1962. 

Chairman Irvin I. Cohen of the Nom- 
inating Committee reported the follow- 
ing as the selection of officers for 1962- 
63: Honorary President, Miss Georgi- 
anna S. Gittinger; President, Samuel A. 
Goldstein (1930); 1st Vice President, 
Milton A. Friedman (1934); 2nd Vice 
President, Robert J. Kokoski (1952); 



Executive Secretary, Frank J. Slama 
(1924); Treasurer, H. Nelson Warfield 
(1924). 

Executive Committee members are: 
James P. Cragg, Jr. (1943), Milton J. 
Brownstein (1934), Thomas C. Daw- 
son (1955), Nathan I. Gruz (1939), 
Casimer T. Ichniowski (1929), Harold 
Levin (1943), Vito Tinelli, Jr. (1961), 
and Ex-Officio, Noel E. Foss, B. Olive 
Cole. 

The members of the graduating class 
were elected as new additions to the 
Alumni Association and will receive 
membership cards as place cards at the 
annual banquet of the Association. 

Elected as Associate Members of the 
Association were Edwin N. Kabernagel, 
Albert V. Ohlendorf and Robert E. 
Theiss. 



Directory of Advertisers 

Acme Iron Works 27 

Advertisers Engraving Company 24 

Alcazar 24 

American Disinfectant Co 20 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 21 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 22 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 20 

Baltimore Envelope Co 20 

Baltimore Photo & Blue Print Co 24 

Bard Avon School 26 

Bergmann's Laundry 29 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 27 

Bon Ton Food Products 30 

Brentwood Inn 24 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc. 21 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 27 

D. Harry Chamhers. Opticians 24 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 30 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters 20 

Del Haven White House Motel 21 

Electronic Wholesalers, Inc 29 

Embassy Dairy 28 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 25 

J. H. Filbert Co 31 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... 23 

John G. Fitzgerald, Plumbing and Heating . 25 

Franklin Uniform Co 24 

Fuller & d' Albert, Inc 27 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 25 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 26 

A. Gude Sons Company 29 

Harvey Dairy 21 

Hotel Harrington 20 

Frank B. Jones, Optician 21 

E. A. Kaestner Co 24 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 25 

King Bros.. Inc 30 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 24 

John D. Lucas Printing Company 31 

Lustine Chevrolet . , 22 

Macke Vending Machines 30 

Maria's Restaurant 20 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co. 26 

Massey-Ferguson, Inc 31 

Modern Machinists Co 31 

Murray-Baumgartner .... 21 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co.. Inc 23 

North Washington Press. Inc 23 

Norman Motor Company. Inc 28 

Ocean City. Md. 

Occidental Restaurant 18 

Oles Envelope Corp. 26 

Ottenberg's Bakers. Inc .27 

Park Transfer Co. ... ... 30 

Poor. Bowen. Bartlett & Kennedy, Inc. 26 
William A. Potthast, Insurance .22 

Rex Engraving Co., Inc 28 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 20 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co.. Inc. 20 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 2/ 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 22_ 

Strayer College . 25 

Student's Supply Store 21 

Sweetheart Bread 30 

Charles H. Tames, Jr.. Insurance 22 

Thomsson Steel Co.. Inc 31 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assoc. 25 

Wallop and Son. Insurance 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange, Inc. 30 

Westinghouse Defense Center 19 

Perry O. Wilkinson, Insurance 27 

Williams Construction Co. 2S 

1. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc 

Winslow Paints 23 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 30 






32 



the Maryland Magazine 



\\ VSHIM.KlN SI \K I'llllllis in IllM HOY. 



Alumnus 
Experiments 

with 

Classroom 

Size 



A UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ALUMNUS HAS CONDUCTED 
some interesting experiments dealing with classroom size. 

As part of his work for his doctorate, Lloyd K. Hoover, 
M. Ed. 1955, now serving as Principal of the Greenbelt Junior 
High School, was one of a group of 22 graduate students in 
the University of Maryland course in School Plant Planning 
which was offered at both the College Park and Baltimore 
campuses during the Fall semester of 1961-62. The classes 
were composed of assistant superintendents of schools, prin- 
cipals, vice-principals, and teachers who are increasing their 
competency in school administration. 

In the school plant course concern was aroused about the 
apparent lack of evidence as to the proper area for class- 
rooms. As educators, all knew that too little area per pupil 
handicaps instruction. The question raised was whether an 
area greater than needed might likewise handicap instruction. 
Therefore each member of the class carried on a project to 
discover what area-per-pupil is adequate to permit varied 
kinds of learning experiences to take place in the classroom. 
Lloyd Hoover experimented with a moveable partition and 
variations in classroom furniture arrangements as shown in 
the accompanying illustrations. 

Lloyd found, as reported in the Washington (D. C.) Even- 
ing Star, that instruction is handicapped by excessive class- 
room area in a number of ways, such as discipline, group 
solidarity, communications, and individual effort by both 
pupils and teachers. His findings were supported by those of 
the projects carried on by the other members of the class. 
It was generally found that a suitable area for a general type 
classroom was in the range of 17 to 22 square feet per pupil 
rather than the 30 to 40 square feet per pupil generally 
advocated. 

The project suggested that teaching and learning experiences 
may be handicapped by excess area. This alone is sufficient 
reason to explore the question thoroughly and to take the 
necessary corrective measures in the planning of school build- 
ings. However, in addition, every square foot of excess area 
costs money initially and entails debt service, operating, and 
maintenance costs for many years or the life of the building. 
This means that local and state wealth is unnecessarily tied 
up in school plant, is unproductive of improved learning, and 
is no longer available for either the improvement of instruc- 
tion or for any other community or personal purpose. Money 
so committed is withdrawn from the economy in such a way 
that it not only serves no productive purpose but also it 
cannot even be put to work to increase the wealth and poten- 
tial of the country. 

The projects in which Hoover and the others who did sim- 
ilar work were engaged have implications that are both educa- 
tionally and economically important to all of the people. It is 
gratifying to find our alumni exploring such an important issue 
and to know that the University of Maryland makes possible 
such exploration. 




The experiment began with seats in double rows and students 

have a comfortable 24 square /eel each. The experiment's mov- 
able wall is at the rear, ready to be moved up one foot a week. 




The wall has moved forward to reduce the room size to 19'/2 
square feet per student. Seats are in a double horseshoe. 




The classroom spiu-e experiment ends with /6'j square feet 
per student with all scats facing a side wall. Principal Hoover 
checks with the teacher, Mrs. Lynn Bigler. 



HERITAGE TRADITION PRIDE 



The University of Maryland is dedicated to all of the 
citizens of Maryland in the fields of research, teaching and 
service. 

The Alumni Association is organized to promote the 
interests of the University of Maryland and to assist in fur- 
thering the mutually-beneficial relations between the Univer- 
sity, its Alumni and the People of the State. 

The Individual Alumnus is one who knows both the 
University and the Association. He has the major concern 
for the future of both for, through his |interest, he can 
guarantee maximum opportunity, brilliant achievement and 
a preservation of the foundation upon which one of our 
country's largest institutions is based. 



PROGRESS SERVICE 



LEAD^sfflP 

! 







U*-fc 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 




Volume XXXIV Number Five • September-October 1962 



• Dr. Mary Shorb 

and the Development of Vitamin Br. 

• A Challenge for Johnny 

• New Alumni Officers are Elected 



What the world's best telephone service is built on 



The foundation of your telephone service is 
composed of three integrated Bell System 
activities. 

First, there's research at Bell Telephone 
Laboratories to find new telephone services 
and new ways to improve present services. 

Second, there's manufacturing by the 
Western Electric Company in order to produce 
top-quality telephone equipment at the lowest 
possible cost. 



Third, there's the operation of the Bell 
System performed by the local Bell Telephone 
Companies at high standards of economy and 
efficiency. 

The results of this three-stage action are 
improved local and Long Distance service... 
ever-better telephone instruments .. .the in- 
vention and use of such modern marvels as 
the Transistor . . . fast, dependable communi- 
cations for defense and for you. 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

Owned by more than two million Americans 





the 




magazine 



IVtg Lrylaji<i 

T 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIV Number 5 

I in Covi i<: The University became a lively and useful place last month 
when a record number of students registered for the Fall Semester. Dunn;' 
the period September 17 through September 21, some 15,474 students 
were processed through the registration procedure at College Park. On the 
Baltimore campus. 1,635 students were enrolled for day-time attendance 
in the professional schools. The College Park registrations represented a 
9.9 percent increase over the Fall Semester registration a\' last year. 



Z* Dr. Mary Shorb and the Development of Vitamin B12 

H" A Challenge for Johnny 

D New Alumni Officers are Elected 

/ A Dynamic Force for Economic Development in Latin America 

O Maryland Books and Authors 

J Inside Maryland Sports 

1 \J The Alumni Diary 

JL 1 Alumni and Campus Notes 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 

DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
HARRY E. HASSLINGER '33, President 
DR. EDWARD STONE, JR., '25, Vice-President 
MRS- ERNA RIEDEL CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN. Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



AD VERTISING DIRECTOR S 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

6451 Blenheim Road 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

DR 7-7692 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March3,1879.-$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Memher of American Alumni Council. 



Dr. Mary Shorb 

and the 

Development of the Vitamin Bi 2 



DR. MARY SHORB, RESEARCH PROFESSOR IN THE 
Department of Poultry Husbandry Nutrition, 
played an important role in the development 
of Vitamin B12, a red crystal substance that 
today is saving the lives of victims of pernicious anemia. 
The story of Vitamin B12 began in 1926, when scien- 
tists Minot and Murphy of Harvard discovered that per- 
nicious anemia patients could be removed from the "fatal" 
list by eating one-half pound of liver per day. Up until 
then, 6,000 Americans had died annually from the disease. 
Effects of this dreaded disease include loss of weight, 
weakness, and, finally, injury to the central nervous sys- 
tem. If a victim is not treated in two or three years, he 
will die. This type of anemia is characterized by a reduced 
number of red blood cells containing an abnormally high 
amount of hemoglobin. It was originally believed that this 
abnormality was due to the destroying of red blood cells, 
rather than a defect in the cell structure, as was later 
discovered. 

Various scientists discovered that pernicious anemia is 
a result of a vitamin deficiency, and, in a clinical treatment 
of the disease, it was discovered that an active anti- 
pernicious anemia substance is found in liver. 

From 1926 to 1946, scientists everywhere were con- 
cerning themselves with isolating this ingredient, and, in 
1938, Dr. Karl Folkers of the Merck, Sharp & Dohme 
Research Laboratories in Rahway, New Jersey, took up 
the search. By that time, enough progress had been made 
so that patients did not have to eat liver, but instead could 
take injections of a crude liver extract. But these treat- 
ments were expensive and since many people could not 
keep up with them, deaths continued to take place. 

In his research to find the anti-pernicious anemia sub- 
stance, Dr. Folkers encountered several stumbling blocks. 
I irst, the best liver extracts contained a mixture of ingredi- 
ents, most of them unknown and hard to separate from 
one another. 

Second, animals could not be made to contract per- 
nicious anemia, so new substances could not be readily 
tried out. 




Dr. Folkers discovered that by testing a series of hy- 
potheses, he could eliminate most of the compounds in the 
liver extracts. He solved the problem of separating out 
the ingredients he wanted to test by using the technique 
of chromatography, which is the filtration of substances 
through glass columns filled with an adsorbing agent. 

For awhile, he made rapid progress, but soon he was 
halted by the difficulty of having to wait for an untreated 
patient each time he had a new substance to test. 

It was at this point, in 1946, when Dr. Folkers was 
wrestling with the problem of finding patients when he 
needed them, that, quite by accident, Dr. Shorb of the 
University entered into the picture. Previously, a legal 
contract had been drawn up by Dr. George Briggs of the 
University's Department of Poultry Husbandry in an un- 
successful attempt to obtain funds for Dr. Shorb, who was 






the Maryland Magazine 



Microscopic photograph 

showing crystals of 

the Vitamin B ,, 




studying the nutrition of a bacterium. Dr. Briggs had given 
Dr. Shorb free laboratory space and she was working 
without pay. Dr. Briggs had shown the contract to Dr. 
Folkers as an example of the terms under which the Uni- 
versity would accept support for research. 

What interested Dr. Folkers was not the terms of the 
contract but the fact that, in her studies, Dr. Shorb had 
discovered that liver extracts, useful in treating pernicious 
anemia, also promoted the growth of her bacteria. Here 
was the solution to Dr. Folkers' problem. Dr. Shorb's 
work with bacteria might help him test new liver fractions 
quickly without having to wait for human patients. Within 
48 hours, Dr. Shorb had received the first shipment of 
liver fractions to test, and full support for her work. 

Dr. Shorb's testings and findings culminated the search 
by the Merck Laboratories for a substitute that would be 
more plentiful and less expensive than liver, and, after 
several months of extensive research, a pure red crystal 
substance was isolated. 

It took two months for New York hospitals to locate an 
untreated case of pernicious anemia for a conclusive test 
of whether the red crystals were the substance in liver that 
would control the disease. 

Finally, a 66-year-old woman was found in King's 
County Hospital in Brooklyn in early February, 1948. Two 
months before she was admitted, she began to notice 
weakness and fatigue, which became progressively worse, 
and a month before admission, her appetite became poor. 
She also began to suffer from swollen ankles and shortness 
of breath. Her skin had a pale, lemonish cast and her 
hemoglobin and red blood cell count were critically low. 

The patient remained in bed for several days and was 
given nothing that would confuse the results of the test 
of Vitamin B12, such as vitamins or liver extracts. On 
February 21, 1948, she was given Vitamin B12. The 
correct dosage was not yet known, so a single injection 
of 150 micrograms was administered. 

In five days, there was a great increase in the manu- 
facture of red blood cells in the patient. At the end of six 
weeks, her red blood cell count was up to normal and her 



strength and appetite were restored, as well as her feeling 
of well being. 

Since then, more than 2,500 papers on Vitamin B12 
have been published in scientific journals all over the 
world. Also important, Vitamin B12 was found to be the 
long-searched-for growth factor found in animal protein. 
This discovery was of great importance to farmers. For- 
merly, they had to add an expensive source of animal 
protein to their feed to speed the growth of poultry and 
livestock. Now they could get the same results at much 
less cost by enriching their vegetable protein feed with 
Vitamin B12. 



Dr. Shorb came to the University in 1949. Pre- 
viously, she was an immunologist for the Abel 
Fund Research on the Common Cold at Johns- 
Hopkins University from 1929 to 1932; a bac- 
teriologist for the Bureau of Home Economics 
and Human Nutrition from 1942 to 1944; a bac- 
teriologist for the Division of Nutrition and Physi- 
ology at the Bureau of Dairy Industry, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, in Beltsville from 1944 
to 1946; and microbiologist and Merck Post- Doc- 
torate Fellow in Poultry Husbandry Nutrition at 
the University of Maryland from 1946 to 1949. 

Dr. Shorb was recipient of the Hematology Re- 
search Foundation award in 1948; co-recipient of 
the Mead Johnson award for research on I 'itamin 
B complex in 1949; outstanding woman of Mary- 
land at Hood College in 1951; Alpha Xi Delta 
Fellow in 1933; Fellow of the New York Academy 
of Science; and is a member of the Washington 
Academy of Sciences, the Society of General Mi- 
crobiology, the American Society of Microbiolo- 
gists, the Society of Experimental Biology and 
Medicine, the Protozoology Society, the American 
Association of University Women, Sigma Xi and 
Delta Omega. 

Dr. Shorb's publications include over 30 papers 
and abstracts on research projects. 



September-October, 1962 



THOTOS BY AL DANEGGER 




A Challenge 
for Johnny 



TWELVE-YEAR-OLD JOHNNY HESITATED A MOMENT 
at the edge of the pool, then dived in and swam 
to the other side. Though totally blind, Johnny's 
small amount of light perception helped him de- 
termine his direction. The photographs accompanying 
this article record Johnny's challenge. 

Johnny and his three companions, Jeannette, Diane and 
Cynthia, ranging in age from 7 to 12, and all blind, par- 
ticipated in the Summer Session of the Children's Physical 
Developmental Clinic of the College of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health. The Clinic, which is spon- 
sored by the College Park Lions Club, is under the direc- 
tion of Professor Warren R. Johnson of the University's 
College of Physical Education. Wesley A. Stickney, Phy- 
sical Education Instructor at the University, volunteered 
to teach the children. He was assisted by Mr. Gale Brown, 
teacher of Special Education of Prince Georges County 
at Hyattsville Elementary School. 

The four children in this particular phase of the aquatic 
program were selected from the Prince Georges Special 
Education "Vision Program." All are better than average 
students in the Hyattsville Elementary School. 

When it came time to swim, these youngsters had many 
of the typical reactions of all children. Some had an easier 
time ducking, some could release themselves to the water 
and "jelly-fish" float easier than others, and others could 
hold their breath longer under water. At first, there did 
seem to be more tension involved in holding their heads 
under water. This may have come through the "uniqueness 
of audial sight" as their life-line. The self-discipline in a 
task that was unpleasant and fear-loaded was very evident 
in these children. They seemed to have learned to go be- 
yond themselves to achieve in the skill of swimming. To 
finally orientate themselves to the kick, the exhaling under 
water, the position of the body in flotation, and other 
general body mechanics, these youngsters had to use 
"tactile sight" as they "viewed" the skills of the instructor 
with their sensitive fingers. 

In spite of fears and some seemingly insurmountable 
problems, the students made great progress in their swim- 
ming lessons, and gained an increase in self-confidence. 
"My, how I like the feeling of that pretty-blue water," was 
a parting statement by one of the novice swimmers. 

the Maryland Magazine 




September-October, 1962 



5 



New Alumni Officers are Elected 



Mr. Hasslinger 



Dr. Stone 



Mrs. Chapman 




HARRY E. HASSLINGER OF COLLEGE PARK HAS BEEN 
elected president of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association for the year 1962-63. He 
succeeds Dr. Reginald V. Truitt of Stephensville 
(Md.). 

Selected to serve with him were two vice-presidents, 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, Jr., of Baltimore and Mrs. Erna 
Riedel Chapman of Gambrills (Md.). 

A native of Baltimore, Mr. Hasslinger graduated from 
the University of Maryland College of Education in 1933. 
After his graduation, he entered the business field and 
then, in 1936, became a member of the faculty at Mc- 
Donogh School in McDonogh (Md.). 

In 1940, Mr. Hasslinger entered on active duty as a 
Reserve Officer with the Army. He served in the United 
States and Europe, and during the closing months of 
World War II was Deputy Chief of Staff with XIII Corps. 
He is a Colonel in the United States Army Reserve and 
commands the first Reserve Corps Headquarters, activated 
by the Army in October, 1959. 

When he left active duty in 1945, Mr. Hasslinger be- 
came associated with the Veterans Administration in Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he is presently the Assistant Area 
Field Director of the VA's Department of Veterans 
Benefits. 

Throughout his life he has been very active in civic 
affairs, including extensive Methodist Church work, the 
Boy Scouts, the PTA, and numerous other organizations. 
He has served as PTA President for the College Park 
Elementary School, member of Prince George's County 
PTA Council, delegate to Maryland State educational 
conferences, City Councilman of College Park, and, in 
1961, was named Outstanding Citizen of College Park. 

Mr. Hasslinger's interest in the educational field has 
been well served by his active association with the Uni- 



versity of Maryland since his graduation. He has been a 
member of the University Alumni Council for a number of 
years, was Vice Chairman in 1947-48 of the University 
of Maryland (College Park) Alumni Association, organ- 
ized and served as the first President of the College of 
Education Alumni Chapter at the University, and was a 
Vice President of the University of Maryland Alumni 
Association. He was also a member of the Governor of 
Maryland's Commission to Study Expansion of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, and is co-author of the pamphlet, 
"Crisis in Education." 

He is married to the former Charlotte Farnham of 
Washington, D. C, who is also a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. The Hasslingers have two children. 
Their daughter, Carol Anne, is a freshman at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, and their son, Mark, is a cadet at 
the McDonogh School. 



D, 



R. EDWARD STONE, JR., '25, IS A GRADUATE OF WEST- 

ern Maryland College and the University of Maryland 
Dental School. He lived most of his early life in Delaware, 
the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

Dr. Stone has maintained a private practice since his 
graduation from the University. In addition, he is presently 
the Dental Surgeon for the Home Office of the Maryland 
Casualty Company, and dental consultant to the Balti- 
more City Health Department. He has served as President 
of Baltimore City Dental Society, President of the Mary- 
land State Dental Association, and delegate for three 
terms to the American Dental Association. He is also a 
member of Psi Omega, national dental fraternity, and 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon, national honor fraternity. 

Continued on next page 



the Maryland Magazine 




Mr. Jarvis ((inter with hand on pipe) in conference m ( 'aracas. 



HARRY A. JARVIS, ENGR. '30, IS CURRENTLY THE 
President of Creole Petroleum Corporation, a 
subsidiary of the Standard Oil Company of New 
Jersey. Engaged in his fourth decade of service 
to the oil industry, Mr. Jarvis' career is one of unique 
interest. 

After his graduation from the University of Maryland, 
he became a student engineer at the Bayway refinery of 
the Esso affiliate in New Jersey. The following year he 
was transferred to Argentina, at which time he began his 
long relationship with Latin America which has continued 
to the present. 

In 1947, Mr. Jarvis left Argentina to become the man- 
ager of the Amuay refinery in Venezuela. In this position 
he was largely responsible for the development of one of 
the major refineries in the western hemisphere. From 
Amuay, Mr. Jarvis transferred to Caracas, the capital city 
of Venezuela, where he became manager of Creole's re- 
fining department. In 1952 he was elected to the Board, 
in 1954 was named Vice-president, and in February of 
1961 he became the President. 

Throughout Mr. Jarvis' career, he has been, simul- 
taneously, a director of private enterprise and an emissary 
of Venezuelan economic welfare. His is a position of 
liaison for the furthering of the oil industry in Latin 
America, the development of numerous natural resources 
in Venezuela, and the coordinating of the consequent 
production to the advantage of private and public interests 
in the Americas. 



A Dynamic Force 
for Economic 

Development in 
Latin America 



To this end Mr. Jarvis has established the Creole In- 
vestment Corporation, with capital currently being invested 
in such enterprises as a firm to make use of yucca plants in 
the manufacture of starch and glucose, the production of 
fiberboard from bagasse, and a fish-meal plant. Numerous 
other diversified projects are under review at present and 
plans are being laid for future development of much of 
the natural wealth of Venezuela. 

Throughout his career in the oil industry and particu- 
larly in his association with Creole, Mr. Jarvis has made 
a noteworthy contribution to the furtherance of American 
enterprise and United States relations with Latin America, 
the economic growth of Venezuela, and the development 
of industrial independence and leadership in Latin 
America. 



New Alumni Officers are Elected 

Among his most widely recognized accomplishments is 
Dr. Stone's success in introducing fluoridation of the public 
water supply in the City of Baltimore. 



IVXrS. ERNA RIEDEL CHAPMAN, H.E., '34, IS CURRENTLY 

the Supervising Director of Home Economics for the 
District of Columbia Public Schools and is also the State 
Director of Home Economics for the District. 

Mrs. Chapman's career in Home Economics has been 
recognized as outstanding by the many associations with 
which she has been affiliated. While a student at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, she was elected to the freshman 
honorary, Alpha Lambda Delta, the Omicron Nu Home 



Economics honorary and Phi Kappa Phi. honorary scho- 
lastic fraternity. She graduated from the University with 
first honors in the College of Education and was offered 
a graduate assistantship, which enabled her to begin work 
on her master's degree. 

After completing her degree and her fellowship. Mrs. 
Chapman joined the faculty of Jefferson Junior High School 
in Washington, D. C and then became a teacher at Roose- 
velt High School in Washington, where, in 1956, she was 
appointed Principal and Dean of Girls. It was during her 
tenure at Roosevelt High School that she developed the 
concept of a rotation method of teaching home economics. 
In May of 1962, she received the annual University of 
Maryland Home Economics award for her outstanding 
contributions to the field of Home Economies. 



September-October, 1962 



Maryland Books and Authors 



by Mrs. Harold Hayes, 
Head, Maryland Room, McKeldin Library 



MUSIC: A DESIGN FOR LISTEN- 
ING by Homer Ulrich. 2d. ed. 
New York: Harcourt Brace. 1962. 
$6.50. 

PROFESSOR ULRICH, WHO HAS BEEN 
head of the Music Department at 
the University of Maryland since 
1953, has recently had published the 
second edition of his widely used 
and highly praised book, Music: a 
Design for Listening (New York: 
Harcourt, Brace & World, 1962). 

His qualifications for producing 
such a work are of the highest, for 
Professor Ulrich is the rare combina- 
tion of performing musician (bas- 
soonist with the Chicago Symphony 
and the San Antonio Symphony for 
a number of seasons), scholar, teach- 
er, administrator, and author. While 
these talents are not each mutually 
exclusive, the word "and" suggests 
an aggregate and therefore a some- 
what inaccurate appraisal. For excel- 
lence in each has enhanced the others. 
In spite of these high qualifications 
in music — or perhaps because of 
them — the main fruit of Professor 
Ulrich's mission as an author has not 
been to produce exhaustive scholarly 
treatises on any particular phase of 
music for an audience of his peers 
only (although he is well equipped 
to do so, and has indeed done so 1 ); 
but to write a number of books de- 
signed to encourage all people to ex- 
plore music and derive thereby the 
joy that only music can give. 

Professor Ulrich's thorough tech- 
nical knowledge of music, immense 
enthusiasm for his subject, and his 



ardent desire to communicate both 
to other people render him a most 
excellent author for such work. 

Concerning the book itself — who 
it is for, and why it is for him — no 
better statement could be made than 
the one given by the author in his 
introduction: 

"The book is for any listener who 
wishes to derive lasting benefit from 
his musical experiences. Its purpose, 
quite simply, is to guide him in his 
search for musical enjoyment and 
understanding. ... A listener exposed 
to a large and varied body of music 
can profit by knowledge of the ele- 
ments common to it all, as well as 
of the elements that differentiate one 
composition from another. It is only 
then that he becomes conscious of 
what he is hearing; and consciousness 
is the beginning of musical enjoy- 
ment." 

Usually books of this type do no 
more than recommend listening to a 
certain amount of selected music, ar- 
ranged from the most familiar to the 
least, and these recommendations are 
most likely accompanied with super- 
ficial biographical data about the 
composers, etc. However, the unique 
feature of Professor Ulrich's book is 
that he introduces the reader and po- 
tential listener to the basic vocabu- 
lary and syntax of music at the out- 
set. Such an approach prepares the 
reader, even if he has had no previous 
musical training (for this text has 
been successfully used in colleges for 
non-music as well as music majors 
and minors), for intelligent and fruit- 
ful participation in music. Professor 



Ulrich tells us, "the listener is an es- 
sential part of the musical process 
... the composer and the listener 
are the terminals between which the 
music flows." 

The reader, having found — perhaps 
to his amazement — that he has 
grasped the knowledge of the basic 
elements and forms of music, now 
moves quite easily into the second 
portion of the book, the "History and 
Literature" of music. This part treats 
the evolution of musical styles 
through selected compositions of ma- 
jor composers. These works are pre- 
sented in chronological order so that 
important historical relationships may 
be known and understood. 

The reader, by knowledge of the 
basic technical information and train- 
ing of his listening by such intelli- 
gence, and by possession of the per- 
spective given to him by historical and 
stylistic knowledge, is equipped bet- 
ter than most to reap one of the real 
joys of life — music. 

The book has been published with 
a revised "student manual," Designed 
for Listening, which was co-authored 
by Dr. Bryce Jordan of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Music faculty. This 
manual provides opportunities for 
self-testing and practice in analytical 
procedures. Included with the manual 
is a set of four long-playing records 
upon which many of the listening 
assignments are based. 

1 e.g. The Penitential Psalms of Lasso. 
Univ. of Chicago, 1939. 

Reviewed by Frederic A. Heut- 
te, Fine Arts Librarian, McKeldin 
Library, University of Maryland. 



Beginning with the November-December issue, personal 
news items concerning alumni will be reported by year of 
graduation in a Classnotes Section. The School and Col- 
lege Columns will be discontinued. All 45,000 Maryland 
Alumni have received survey forms in the mail. These will 
be used as the nucleus for the organization of the new 
Classnotes^ Section and should be returned completed to 
the Director of Alumni Relations, University of Mary- 
land at College Park. Thank you for your cooperation. 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 



Inside Maryland SpOrtS by Neil La Bar Director oj 'Mil. Spans Information 




FOR UN1VKRS1TY OF MARYLAND FOOTBALL, PROGRJ ss 
is their most important product, and since Head Foot- 
ball Coach Tom Nugent has been on the Terrapin scene, 
the Terps have progressed. 

From a 5-5 season in 1959 to 6-4 in '60 and 7-3 last 
year the Terrapins have been on the rise. There is reason 
to believe the steady climb will continue this season under 
colorful Tom Nugent. 

At the date of this writ- 
ing, we have won our first 
four games: 7-0, SMU; 13- 
2, Wake Forest; 14-6, North 
Carolina State; and 31-13, 
North Carolina. The fifth 
was lost by a whisker to 
Miami (Fla.) 24-28. 

Shiner is more than living 
up to preseason hopes of 
Coach Nugent and Tom 
Brown is having a great 
year. In fact, it looks like 
a great year for Maryland. 
Let's take a look at what 
we have. 

Nineteen lettermen return to the '62 Terrapin squad, 
with the best sophomore group in Coach Nugent's tenure 
at Maryland. Last year's freshman team was unbeaten 
and veteran Terrapin observers think the youngsters will 
fill in the spots. 

The Terps are going to the three-team system this sea- 
son for the first time. Coach Nugent and his staff toyed 
with the idea a couple of years back but felt as though the 
thinness of the ranks prevented the use of such a system. 
That fact in itself may be the tipoff on the strength of the 
'62 Maryland squad. 

The "M-Squad" will be the first unit or two-way squad 
(offense and defense). The "Gangbusters" will be the de- 
fensive unit and the "Hustlers" will be the offensive unit. 

At quarterback the Terrapins only have one letterman 
back but he should fill the bill more than adequately at 
that vital position. His name is Dick Shiner, a junior from 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania. Shiner has all the makings of 
Maryland's best quarterback of all time. 

Shiner has the command and poise of a senior, plus he 
is a strong, hard runner and to top it all, he is a passer 
deluxe. The 6-0, 195-pound junior tied an ACC record 
last year by tossing three touchdown passes in the Penn 
State game. 

Backing Shiner at the signal-calling post are three 
promising sophomores, Jim Corcoran, Mike Funk and 
Bruce Springer. Don White, carrying the best grade aver- 
age (3.67) on the squad, is a punting specialist. 

Tom Brown, probably the finest all-around athlete on 
the Terp roster, leads the halfback corps. The 185-pound 
senior broke the ACC record for interceptions (eight) 
last year, intercepting three against the Air Force, to tie 
another ACC mark. Brown has uncanny ability in return- 
ing punts and kickoffs. The Silver Spring boy averaged 
24.5 yards in punt returns last year for a new Terrapin 
record. Tommy is a fine receiver as evidenced by his 1 1 
receptions last season for 232 yards. 



Other halfback lettermen to watch are I mie Vrizzi, 
Murnis Banner, Dan Piper and Renin Smith. Senioi John 
Hannigan is a place-kicking specialist who kicked 17 

extra points last season in 17 attempts, ["he Oaklyn, New 

Jersey, youngster only missed one field goal in six tries. 

At fullback the Terrapins have two lettermen. Bob 
Burton and Joe Hre/o provide the experience needed at 
fullback. Neither Burton or Hre/o have great si/e but 
they have the running ability to keep the defense "honest ' 
up the middle. Backing up the veterans is a bright prospect 
with si/e. Jerry lishman. 6-1, 220 pounds, the top runner 
on last year's freshman team, could work into a starting 
role. The hard-running sophomore gained 593 yards last 
season lor the freshman team, while scoring six touch- 
downs. Three of the six TD's came against George Wash- 
ington, on runs of 34, 54 and 69 yards. 

The Terps only have one letterman at center but the 
vital position is not figured to be a trouble spot. Gene 
Feher, a 200-pound junior, is a smart defensive signal 
caller who has the ability to jar the ball loose from opposing 
runners. Bolstering the center are Ed Gilmore and Ron 
Lewis. Gilmore is a line offensive blocker and will prob- 
ably specialize with the "Hustlers" (offensive unit). Lewis 
is a sophomore who has good lateral movement. Ron is 
young but looks like a top prospect. 

The Terrapin end corps could be the weakest spot on 
the team with the loss of Ail-American Gary Collins, Dick 
Barlund and Hank Poniatowski. However, lettermen 
Harry Butsko, Joe Mona and Tom Rae should give the 
tlankmen experience enough to blend with a good-looking 
young prospect, Jerry Osier. Butsko is big (210) and 
strong and moves well. Mona was injured in the Spring 
but should be ready in the Fall for extensive duty. Rae 
has good hands plus good size (215) and could be the 
top Terrapin end. 

The Terp tackle slot could be another trouble spot 
with only two lettermen returning. The youngsters will 
have to come through to bolster such top performers as 
Dave Crossan and Roger Shoals. Crossan (215) and 
Shoals (240) are top pro prospects and are among the 
top college linemen in the country. Crossan is exceptionally 
aggressive, agile, strong and has good speed. Dave is one 
of the hardest workers on the squad. Shoals has the size 
(240), good lateral movement and is a good blocker and 
tackier. He has the ability to become a top pro lineman. 
Probably the best youngster in the group is Mike Fornilj 
(6-4, 255). The Washington, D. C, Sophomore could 
develop into one of the best all-time Maryland tackles. 

The guard position appears to be the strongest line- 
spot. Four lettermen return at guard: Chet Detko (215), 
Joe Ferrante (200), Gary Jankowski (190) and Walter 
Rock (225). Olaf Drozdov (210) seems to be the sopho- 
more with the best chance of cracking the veteran lineup. 
Detko is strong and one of the top Terp linemen. Fer- 
rante seems to diagnose plays well and is aggressive. 
Jankowski is a hard-nose ballplayer who has good speed. 
Rock is a line pro prospect and is a smart, heady-type 
player. Drozdov came into his own this spring and could 
move one of the veterans out. 

Whether the Terrapins progress to an 8-2 or better 
season of course depends on many factors. One thing 
for sure, it will be an interesting challenge. 



September-October, 1962 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representatives: 

IGII( U LTUI K 

Mylo Downey, '27 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
H. M. Carroll. 70 

UIS A SI HSI IS 

Joe Malhias, '35 
Jess Krajovic, '32 
Richard Bourne, '57 

BUSINESS * PUBLIC A I) M 1 N 1 S I K A T I n \ 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr. 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 
Jacob B. Sclar, '34 

DENTISTRY 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Edward D. Stone, Jr., '25 
Dr. George B. Clendenin, '29 

E DUCAT ION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 
Harry E. Hasslinger, '33 
Miss Dorothy Ordwein, '35 

ENGINEERING 

Emmett T. Loane, '29 

Tracy Coleman, '35 
James A. Stapp, Jr., '47 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '43 



Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 
Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplet!, '11 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth Roth Hipp, '29 

Miss Doris Stevens, '51 

Mrs. Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48 

PHARMACY 

Hyman Davidov '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen '25 
Dr. Frank J. Slama '24 



EXOFFICIO MEMBERS: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, A&S '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, A&S '57 

Field Secretary 
Past Presidents 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, DDS '19 
C. V. Koons, Engr. '29 
Talbot T. Speer, Agr. '17 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, MD '12 
Col. O. H. Saunders, Engr. '10 
J. Homer Remsberg, Agr. '18 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, LL.B. '33 
Joseph H. Deckman, Engr. '31 
Frank Block, Phar. '24 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., BPA '42 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, 

Nurs. '47; Edu. '51 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, A&S '14 



ALUMNI CLUB REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — John L. Lampe, A&S, '50 
"M" Club — George W. Knepley, Edu., '39 
Montgomery County — Donald M. Boyd 
Pittsburgh— A. B. "Budd" Fisher, Eng '26 
Prince Georges County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, DDS '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, Agr. '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens, Agr. '19 
U. S. Department of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, Agr. '26 
Washington County — 

Charles B. Huyctt, A&S '53 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



HE WAS AN ALUMNUS, THIS MAN WHO BROUGHT HIS YOUNGSTER TO THE 
campus to register as a freshman. It had been a number of years since 
he had left these grounds and there was as much wonderment in his eyes as 
in those of the son who had at least a four-year experience ahead of him. One 
enjoys this double reaction as two generations try to find their way through 
the routine that is registration for thousands and the maze of quite similar 
structures making up one of the country's most attractive campuses. 

The two were lost in what must have been memory for the one and antici- 
pation for the other. Then came the message as the alumnus spoke to himself, 
"It's Georgian all the way. Even the new buildings have blended in so rapidly 
you can hardly tell where the old buildings stop and the new begin." Then 
as an afterthought, "Son, you are taking up where I left off and after a little 
of the newness rubs off others will see about the same thing in both of us." 

So it is. . . . The campus grows, it progresses and it keeps pace with the 
times. The building program is constant and impressive. New research projects 
mean new discoveries and new knowledge. New minds are cultivated and 
add to the prestige of a University that somehow retains an identity recognized 
by the oldest who returns to seize once again the memory of an awestruck 
youth setting his foot on the University campus for the first time. 

How can anyone know the inner potential of those who take this first step. 
Will this hopeful young dreamer become a doctor, lawyer, businessman, 
scientist or farmer? Is he destined to be a leader or a follower? Will he achieve 
or fail? Will he become a sophomore? Will he go on to graduation (for sixty 
percent do not)? There is an old African proverb, "Any fool can count the 
number of apples on a tree. How many can count the number of trees in an 
apple." 

Yes, this was one green apple on the tree of opportunity. He, like all the 
rest, was getting a start. He might grow to be the most perfect and most de- 
sired. He might develop a blemish or even wither and drop before the harvest. 
He might turn sour or reach strongly for all the rich nourishment available 
to him. These must have been the thoughts of a hopeful parent as he saw 
his young man face the campus for the first time. From this point forward 
his son would be traveling the road alone. It was painful to release a boy's 
hand and with some uncertainty say, "Walk it alone son, for now you are 
a man." 

He was an alumnus and he knew something of this road. This is probably 
the reason he recalled a small lad on a winter day taking those giant steps 
in heavy snow. When he had questioned the little fellow concerning this 
great effort to stretch those short legs the reply had come quickly, "I'm trying 
to walk in your footsteps, Dad." 

The boy will succeed! Soon, all too soon, he'll be another alumnus who 
had made his mark and in whom the University and his Dad can be proud. 



Sincerely, 




tpv£_^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



OCTOBER 


3 


13 Football — North Carolina — 


10 


Away. 


17 


19 Football — Miami — Away. 




27 Football (Homecoming) — 


21 


South Carolina at College Park. 


24 


NOVEMBER 


26 


1-3 U. T. Production — "Paint Your 


30 



Wagon" — College Park. 



Football — Penn State — Away. 

Football — Duke — Away. 

Football (Parents Day) — 

Clemson at College Park. 

Thanksgiving Recess Begins. 

Football — Virginia at College 

Park. 

Thanksgiving Recess Ends. 

U. T Production — "The Lady's 

Not For Burning" — 

College Park 



DECEMBER 

19 Christmas Program — College 

Park. 

21 Christmas Recess Begins. 



JANUARY 

3 Christmas Recess Ends. 
23 Pre-Examination Study Day. 




An architect's rendering of the University of Maryland Denton 
Hall dormitory complex. Denton Hall, left foreground, now 
under construction and slated for completion in September 



1963, is the third, 500-unit, high-rise building on the College 
Park campus. Dining Hall Four, which will serve this dormi- 
tory complex, is also under construction. 



September-October, 1962 



11 



University Scientists Study the Plasma of Outer Space 



Better understanding of the dilute plas- 
ma which fills the "emptiness" of outer 
space may come out of a new program 
ol cooperative research between the 
University of Maryland and the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration. 

Dr. Thomas D. Wilkerson of the In- 
stitute tor fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics at the University has re- 
cently been awarded a NASA grant of 
MS. 179. 14 for supporting work on an 
•Interplanetary Plasma Probe." Parallel 
studies are being made by Dr. Keith W. 
Ogilvie at NASA's Goddard Space 
Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. 

Ogilvie and Wilkerson are adapting a 
highly sensitive laboratory device to 
study the abundance and energies of 
positively-charged particles in space. 
These particles, called "ions," are actu- 
ally atoms stripped of their negative 
parts (electrons). It is believed that most 
of the solar system contains a low- 
density mixture, or "plasma," of ions 
and electrons in about equal parts. This 
plasma can be thought of as part of the 
sun's atmosphere extending outward 
from the visible sun for a hundred mil- 
lion miles or more and thereby envelop- 
ing the earth and many of its sister 
planets. 

The plasma's temperature and motion 
are probably important factors in dis- 
turbances of the earth's immediate at- 
mosphere, such as "northern lights" and 
radio "fade-outs," which follow violent 
solar events like flares and sun spots. 
Many scientists believe that plasma 
steadily streams outward from the sun 
as a "solar wind" with a mean velocity 
about 200 miles a second and a particle 
density between 10 and 100 per cubic 



centimeter at the orbit of earth. One of 
the tasks for the NASA-Maryland plas- 
ma probe will be to measure this solar 
wind during satellite missions which go 
well outside the much denser atmosphere 
of the earth. The probe's great sensi- 
tivity will allow more detailed measure- 
ments than have been possible until now. 

In interviews following the announce- 
ment of this program, both Drs. Ogilvie 
and Wilkerson stressed the balance of 
theory and experiment necessary in sci- 
entific work. From their comments, the 
following history of the solar wind con- 
cept can be traced. The solar wind was 
first proposed about 10 years ago by 
Prof. Ludwig Biermann of Munich to 
explain telescope observations of comet- 
tail motion. The theory of solar winds 
has been developed extensively by Prof. 
Eugene Parker of the University of 
Chicago. 

The possibility has been raised that 
many other stars, besides the sun, emit 
plasma winds and that the large amount 
of matter involved might play a large 
part in the evolution of stars and the 
universe. Thus direct measurements of 
our own solar wind may give some indi- 
cations about broader astrophysical 
problems, as well as enlightening us 
about our own small portion of the 
universe. 

Plasma experiments in satellites have 
been carried out in Russia (Dr. K. I. 
Gringauz and others), and in this coun- 
try by groups at the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology (Profs. H. S. 
Bridge and B. Rossi and others) and at 
NASA's Ames Research Center in Cali- 
fornia (Dr. W. Bader). The results 
roughly confirm solar wind theory and 
show that the wind is diverted from in- 



timate contact with our atmosphere by 
the earth's magnetic field. 

The "interface" region where the di- 
version of the solar wind takes place 
will also be studied under the NASA- 
Maryland program. For this and other 
purposes, the new plasma analyzer may 
be more suitable than previous methods 
because it can register the arrival of 
much fewer ions in its detector unit. In 
the full solar wind, this analyzer will 
allow the density, temperature, direction 
and mean speed of the wind to be found 
very accurately. 

A laboratory analyzer of this type was 
developed a year ago and operated at 
the Plasma Physics Laboratory, Prince- 
ton University, by Dr. Wilkerson and a 
colleague, Dr. Harold P. Eubank. Dr. 
Eubank will be a consultant to the 
NASA-Maryland program, having taken 
part in original discussions of the space 
application with Drs. Ogilvie, Wilker- 
son, and Frank B. McDonald, head of 
the fields and particles branch of the 
space science's division at Goddard. The 
Goddard program is now in the plane- 
tary ionospheres branch under R. E. 
Bourdeau. 

Dr. Wilkerson's grant from NASA 
will also support the training of grad- 
uate students in space sciences. 

According to the Institute's director, 
Prof. Monroe H. Martin, one of the 
Institute's main functions is to provide 
such guidance and support for advanced- 
degree research in the fields of physics, 
astronomy, mathematics, and aeronauti- 
cal engineering. This new grant is viewed 
as an important addition to present In- 
stitute research in both experimental 
plasma physics and theoretical space 
physics. 



New, 500-unit Residence Hall 
to be Completed Next Year 

Construction of a new high-rise, 500- 
unit women's residence building and a 
dining hall on the College Park campus 
has been started and completion of 
these facilities is expected in August of 
1963. 

To be known as Denton Hall, the 
eight-story brick and stone dormitory 
will be located at the north entrance to 
the campus near Byrd Stadium. Denton 
Hall is the first of a three dormitory 
complex planned for this location and 
will be erected at a cost of $1,570,000. 
The dining hall which will serve the en- 
tire complex will be constructed at a 
cost ol $799,000. Denton Hall is 
financed by a 50 percent appropriation 
from the 1962 Maryland General As- 
sembly and 50 percent by self-liquidat- 



ing funds of the University derived from 
dormitory operations. 

Architect for the residence hall is 
Ted Englehardt, of Silver Spring. Jo- 
hannes and Murray, also of Silver 
Spring, are the architects for the dining 
hall. Both buildings will be constructed 
by James L. Partello, Inc., of Laurel. 

The lobby will contain an elevator, 
reception desk with two mail alcoves, 
and several small visiting areas. These 
will be a part of, yet separated from, 
the public lobby. 

Down a wide staircase there will be 
a 40' x 80' recreation room which, with 
mobile partitions, will be divided into 
small meeting rooms. Here, too, there 
will be a small kitchen for informal 
snacking and vending machines. The 
main student laundry with fourteen 
washers and twelve dryers will also be 
on this floor. There will be ten ironing 
boards in a separate room with ample 
folding tables and hanging rods. 



The living quarters will be on the 
upper floors. 

The graduate students, who serve as 
faculty residents, will live on the third, 
fifth and seventh floors, with thirty 
double rooms and six single rooms on 
each of those floors. The second, fourth, 
sixth and eighth floors will have thirty- 
four double and four single rooms. 

Elevators will open into lounges on 
each floor. These will serve as informal 
living room areas. 

The students' rooms will be finished 
in lightly tinted tones with clear varnish 
enhancing the natural grain of brick 
and pine. 

Each student will have bed, desk, 
chest, chair, mirror and closet space to 
which they will add their selected drapes, 
spreads and wall hangings. 

Corridors and rooms will have vinyl 
tile floors in appropriate colors. The 
corridors will also have wainscots in 
light glazed masonry. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 







ri »S EH WEIL ii M i 



>. 
^ 



•*j*&**- 





First Maryland-Trained 



Peace Corpsmen Leave for Foreign Assignments 



Certificates of completion were awarded 
on August 18 to 33 Peace Corps candi- 
dates who completed an eight-week 
training program at the University. 

This group has departed for British 
Honduras to assume duties during the 
next two years as secondary school and 
college teachers. 

During a ceremony in the College of 
Business and Public Administra'ion 
Auditorium, Peace Corps members 
heard addresses by Dr. R. Lee Horn- 
bake, Vice President for Academic 
Affairs, and Warren W. Wiggins, Act- 
ing Director of the Peace Corps. 

Two other ceremonies were held at 
College Park for the Peace Corps candi- 
dates, who completed their training in 
late August. On August 25, certificates 
were awarded a group being sent to 
Turkey. Peace corpsmen slated for 
Venezuela and Ecuador received certi- 
ficates on August 31. 

During the eight-week program, a 



University of Maryland faculty of 24 
and about 30 guest lecturers conducted 
ten hours of intensive training from 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and from 7:30 to 9:30 
p.m. daily. 

Peace corpsmen who are assigned to 
Turkey, Venezuela, and Ecuador re- 
ceived a crash language study program, 
including a minimum average of four 
hours of daily instruction. In addition, 
Turkish and Spanish nationals were as- 
signed to the Peace Corps dormitory 
area so that the students could practice 
the languages during meal hours and 
after classes. English is the national 
language of British Honduras. 

All of these trainees received instruc- 
tion in technical subjects, physical edu- 
cation and recreation, health and medi- 
cal training, and the history, geography 
and culture of the countries to which 
they were sent. 

A team of lecturers from George 
Washington University conducted 




courses in American studies. The Johns 
Hopkins School for Advanced Interna- 
tional Studies conducted a course on 
world affairs, which included training 
in the philosophy, tactics and strategy 
of Communism. 

Maryland is one of seven universities 
pooling their resources to help train 
Peace Corps volunteers. Other members 
of the consortium are: American. 
George Washington, Howard, George- 
town, Catholic and Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versities. 

The training program at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland is being financed by a 
$192,648.06 contract with the Peace 
Corps. 

Six of the University's eight colleges 
at College Park are involved in the in- 
structional program which is being co- 
ordinated by Dr. V. R. Cardozier under 
the University's Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs, Dr. R. Lee Hornbake. 



September-October, 1962 



13 



PHOTO BY AL DANEGGER 










14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Some Recent Grants 
to the University 

For acquisition of equipment to be used 
in a nuclear science and /or engineering 
program. 

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION TO DEPART- 
MENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

$27,250. 
* 

For supplemental expenses and staff pro- 
fessional development program. 

GRANT FOUNDATION, INC. TO INSTITUTE 
FOR CHILD STUDY 

$4,500. 

* 

For research in atmospheric and space 

physics. 

U. S. WEATHER BUREAU TO DEPARTMENT 
OF PHYSICS 

$150,000. 

* 

For mathematical research in fields of 

fluid and applied mathematics. 

U. S. AIR FORCE TO INSTITUTE FOR FLUID 
DYNAMICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

$60,060. 

* 

For research in behavioral repertoires 

under full environmental control. 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE AD- 
MINISTRATION TO DEPARTMENT OF 
PSYCHOLOGY 
$100,000. 

* 

For research on luminescence as a func- 
tion of dose, dose rate, and electron 
energy. 

THE WALLACE JOYCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEER- 
ING 

$25,000. 
* 

For research on boundary value prob- 
lems. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO IN- 
STITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND AP- 
PLIED MATHEMATICS 
$52,000. 
* 

For research on problems in the geo- 
metric function theory. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT TO DE- 
PARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

$53,000. 

For research on studies on arborvirus 
infections in equines. 

OFFICE OF SURGEON GENERAL TO DE- 
PARTMENT OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 

$42,724. 



Senate Passes BealTs Bill To Return 
Federal-Occupied Land to the University 



A bill introduced by Senator J. dlenn 
Beall to authorize the reconveyance to 
the State of Maryland of certain Fed- 
erally-owned lands on the University ol 
Maryland campus was passed by the 
Senate on September 12. Senator Beall 
said that he hopes the measure, S. 3019, 
will now receive prompt and favorable 
action in the House of Representatives. 

Senator Beall said that passage of S. 
3019 is '"essential for the proper accom- 
modation of the enlarged enrollment at 
the University," and he called particu- 
lar attention to "the fact that the Fed- 
eral government no longer has use for 
the land, and the further fact that the 
State of Maryland would pay the Fed- 
eral government for the land." 

According to the Maryland Senator, 
the College Park land involved in the 
reconveyance is presently held by 
the Federal Bureau of Mines and the 
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, both 
of the Department of the Interior, and 
that Department, through Under Secre- 
tary James K. Carr, "has agreed to the 
relinquishing of the land, and has rec- 
ommended enactment of the proposed 
legislation with two changes." 



Senator Beall explained that, "while 
in the original bill the sum ol $2,245,000 

would have been appropriated lor relo- 
cation of the Interior activities, the In- 
terior asked that the amount be changed 

to $3,480,000 because ol revised esti- 
mates ol actual cost." A further change 
asked by the Interior had to do with the 
price to be paid by the State of Mary- 
land for the land, the Senator said, con- 
tinuing: "In the original bill, the State 
would have paid the sum of $1,045,000; 
the Interior asked that this figure be de- 
leted and that in place thereof the fol- 
lowing be inserted: 'the lair market 
value for the described lands and the 
fixed improvements thereon, as deter- 
mined by the Secretary of the Interior, 
such fair market value to be determined 
as of the effective date of the subject 
contract.' " 

Senator Beall said that the officials 

of the University of Maryland had ac- 
cepted the Interior Department's pro- 
posal, and he offered for the record a 
copy of a letter from Dr. Wilson H. 
Elkins, President of the University, ex- 
pressing agreement with the recommen- 
dations of the Interior Department. 



New Bureau Established 

A Bureau of Educational Research and 
Field Services will be established by the 
College of Education. Dr. Walter B. 
Waetjen, Professor of Education, will 
head the new bureau. 

Purpose of the Bureau will be to assist 
local schools throughout the State of 
Maryland by: 

• acting as a coordinating agency 
which would make available consultant 
services from within, as well as outside 
the University, 

• assisting with surveys in a variety of 
areas, such as school plant, curriculum, 
finance and personnel, 

• conducting research, 

• assisting school personnel engaged 
in research, 

• assisting local schools in the select- 
ing, analysis and interpretation of tests 
and test data, and 

• cooperating with research agencies 
in the State Department of Education, 
the public schools, and other institutions 
of higher learning. 



According to Dean Anderson, the re- 
sponsibility of training teachers does not 
end when the teacher is graduated from 
the University. 

"Local school systems are increasingly 
identifying problem areas in which they 
want University help, and the College 
of Education wants to provide help on 
these problems," he said. 

Establishment of the Bureau resulted 
following a meeting of public school 
superintendents, and representatives of 
the State Board of Education and the 
University's College of Education fac- 
ulty. 

Preliminary conferences are now be- 
ing held on projects which will be 
started this fall. 



President Elkins 
Elected Trustee 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the 
University, has been elected a Trustee 
of the Maryland Academy of Sciences. 
Also elected to a trusteeship was 
Jacob Blaustein, Baltimore industrialist. 



September-October, 1962 



15 



College of 
AGRICULTURE 

A. B. Hamilton 



Heavner Heads 4-H Center 

A former 4-H member and Maryland 
graduate. Richard A. Heavner, '62, of 
Cumberland has been named manager 
of the National 4-H Center. The Na- 
tional 4-H Center is located in Bethesda, 
Maryland, and is operated in behalf of 
the Nation's 2,500,000 4-H members. 

Heavner was a Maryland delegate to 
the 1959 National Conference and was 
present when President Eisenhower cut 
the symbolic green and white ribbons, 
formally opening the National 4-H Cen- 
ter. Nearly three years later Heavner 
became the manager of this "working 
memorial" to 4-H Club work. 



Reed From Brazil 

Lowell H. Reed, '53, has returned home 
with his family after spending three 
years in Brazil as Agricultural Extension 
Advisor and Program Assistant to the 
U. S. Agency for International Devel- 
opment. Mr. Reed assisted and advised 
Brazilian State Extension Service work- 
ers in the northeast State of Pernam- 
buco and Parailba. This one of the larg- 
est sugar-producing states of Brazil. 



Shipley to Hall of Fame 

H. Burton Shipley, '41 alumnus and 
legendary basketball and baseball coach 
at the University, was named to the 
Helms Hall of Fame at Los Angeles in 
July. "Ship" was more than a coach; he 
was a molder of men. 



Capt. Miller to Andrews 

( apt Thomas D. Miller, '53, has been 
reassigned to Andrews Air Force Base, 
Maryland, following his completion of 
the Tactical Air Command deep sea 
survival course at Tinker Field. 



Dyas Commissioned 

John J. Dyas, '61, has been commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the Air 
Force and has been assigned to Chanutc 
Air Force Base. 



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the Maryland Magazine 



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College of 

ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



Pittsburgh Fellowship 

William H. Hussman, Jr., '60, was one 
of lour recipients of Pittsburgh Plate 
Glass Foundation Fellowships tor grad- 
uate study in Urban Renewal and Re- 
development at the University of Pitts- 
burgh's Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs. 

The grants permit a maximum stipend 
of $1500 per term for each Fellow and 
may be extended to cover the two or 
three terms necessary to complete the 
Urban Renewal program at Pitt. 

Mr. Hussmann has served as assistant 
planner to the mayor and council of 
Rockville, Maryland, during the past 
two years. Prior to his graduation from 
the University, he had been associated 
with the U. S. Bureau of Census and 
Department of Interior as a geographic 
aide. He is married and the father of 
two children. 

Named General Manager 

William F. Keller, '43, of Red Bank, 
New Jersey, was named General Man- 
ager of the Blakiston Division (medical 
books), of the McGraw-Hill Book Com- 
pany of New York. 

Mr. Keller joined the Blakiston Com- 
pany in 1945, prior to the merger of 
Blakiston with McGraw-Hill in 1954. 
He became an editor in the College Di- 
vision of McGraw-Hill in 1954, and re- 
turned to Blakiston in 1956 as editor- 
in-chief. 

Admitted to Supreme Court 

Nicholas Kozay, Jr., '50, of Philadelphia 
was admitted to the Supreme Court on 
May 28, 1962, on the motion of the 
Honorable Edward J. Griffiths of the 
Court of Common Pleas No. 1 in Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Kozay was admitted to the Su- 
preme Court of Pennsylvania by the 
same judge on June 2, 1958, and has 
been practicing since April of 1958. In 
conjunction with his practice, he has 
held the position of Deputy Clerk of 
the Court of Quarter Sessions in Phila- 
delphia for 10 years. At present, he is 
considering an offer of appointment to 
the District Attorney's office in Phila- 
delphia. 

Mathematics Grant 

A team of University of Maryland 
mathematics researchers have received 
a grant of $53,000 from the National 

(Continued on next page) 



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September-October, 1962 



17 



Science Foundation to continue some 
technical investigations they started two 
years ago. 

The mathematical study they are di- 
recting is entitled "Problems in Geo- 
metric Function Theory." 

The project is under the direction of 
Dr. James Hummel. Dr. Mischael Ze- 
dek. and Prof. Robert H. Mountjoy. all 
of the Mathematics Department. They 
are assisted by four graduate-student 
researchists. 

The $53,000 grant is a renewal of an 
original grant which was made two years 
ago. 



New Trade Director 

Edward M. Rider, '47, of Chevy Chase, 
has been appointed Executive Director 
of the new trade association, the Na- 
tional Vitamin and Drug Association, 
located at 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Rider previously held positions 
of responsibility with both government 
agencies and trade associations in the 
Washington area. During the past three 
years, he was Assistant Director of Gov- 
ernment-Industry Relations for the Na- 
tional Canners Association. He is a 
member of the Washington Trade Asso- 
ciation Executives and the National 
Press Club. 

While at the University, Mr. Rider 
served as Editor-in-Chief of The Dia- 
mondback and was former president of 
Sigma Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa. 
He has served on the General Alumni 
Council and also as President of the 
College of Arts and Sciences Alumni 
Association. He is a member of Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon fraternity. 



Alumni Notes 

James H. Benner, '30, of Bethesda, 
Maryland, reports that at present he is 
an attorney, a member of the Maryland 
and District of Columbia Bars, and a 
chartered life underwriter with the Mas- 
sachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, of which he is also a member of 
the President's Club for having written 
$1,000,000 worth of life insurance in 
1961. 

The Benners have a summer home on 
the Patuxent in Calvert City, Maryland. 

Richard S. Margeson, '61, of Lake- 
wood, California, has been commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the United 
States Air Force upon graduation from 
Officer Training School at Lackland 
Air Force Base, Texas. 

The lieutenant, a member of Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon fraternity, is being re- 
assigned to James Connally Air Force 
Base, Texas, for navigator training. 

In a recent letter to Tom Orpwood of 
the News Bureau, Herbert Allison, '35, 
of New York City reports that his wife, 




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Mary, has finished two years of college 
and plans to major in Anthropology. 
The Allisons' oldest son, Herbert, Jr., 
is serving as an orderly at Meadowhrook 
Hospital this summer to determine 
whether he wants to enter the medical 
profession, and their second son. George, 
15. a sophomore in high school, is a 
licensed ham radio operator who sends 
his father on "endless errands to Radio 
Row in Lower Manhattan to bring back 
esoteric items of equipment." 

Kenneth F. Woods. A & S, '59, re- 
ceived a Doctor of Philosophy degree 
from the Graduate School at American 
University, Washington, D. C, with a 
major in Latin American History, at 
annual commencement exercises at the 
University on June 10. 

Mr. Woods' dissertation topic was: 
"Samuel Guy Inman — His Role in the 
Evolution of Inter-American Coopera- 
tion." He plans a career as a college 
professor. 

University of Maryland graduates 
who received advanced degrees at the 
Spring Quarter Commencement at Ohio 
State University, Columbus, Ohio, were: 
Alfred J. Pratt, B.S., '51, M.S., '54, a 
doctor of philosophy degree; Thomas 
Salimeno, Jr., D.D.S., '52, a master of 
science degree; and Jacqueline E. Spen- 
cer, A & S, '60, a master of arts degree. 

University alumni who were recipients 
of advanced degrees at the University 
of Delaware at commencement exer- 
cises on June 10 were: J. Jefferson Mil- 
ler II, LL.B., '53, a master of arts de- 
gree; Clyde F. Culver, Agr., '59, James 
William Dickerson, Agr., '59, Domi- 
nick Mangano, A & S, '53, and Gerald 
F. Baughn, Agr., '61, master of science 
degrees; Raymond George Mueller, 
Agr., '43, and Russell Perry, Phy. Ed., 
'50, Master of Education degrees. 

Four alumni of the University re- 
ceived graduate degrees at commence- 
ment exercises at Harvard University on 
June 14. They were: John W. Biggs, 
BPA, '54, a master's degree in Business 
Administration; Paul A. Brown, BPA, 
'57, a master's in Business Administra- 
tion; Robert E. Carignan, University 
College, '59, a master's in Business Ad- 
ministration; and Howard S. Chasanow, 
A & S, '59, LL.B., '61, a master's degree 
in Law. 

Joseph Martin Mehl, Jr., A & S, 39, 
was graduated from The American Uni- 
versity, Washington, D.C.,at commence- 
ment exercises on June 10. Mr. Mehl 
received a Doctor of Philosophy degree 
in History from the Graduate School 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
title of his dissertation was "Intelligence 
Reporting by American Observers from 
the European Neutrals, 1917-1919; Se- 
lect Cases." 

Mary V. Molden, A & S, '45, re- 
ceived a master of arts degree in Edu- 
cation at the 136th annual commence- 
ment exercises on June 13 at Western 
(Continued on next page) 



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erve University in Cleveland. Ohio. 

Manuel San Sabino, the former 

Fones, A & S. '56, was awarded 

a master of education degree from 

cher College, Tow son. Maryland, at 

,'iiencement exercises on June 10. 

Mr. Daniels Receives Grant 

Walter E. Daniels, a graduate student 
in the Department of Physics, has been 
awarded a $2,500 grant by the Ameri- 
can Machine and Foundry Company's 
Research and Development Division. 

This grant will be used by Mr. Dan- 
iels to finance a graduate research proj- 
ect on the properties of metals during 
the academic year of 1962-63. 

Dr. Cohn Morrison, Research Direc- 
tor of the A.M.F.'s Arlington, Virginia, 
Division, announced that the award had 
been arranged through the office of Dr. 
Hamilton Herman, Vice President for 
Research and Development, in New 
York City. This is one of several awards 
being made by A.M.F. in support of 
particularly promising graduate research 
projects in physics throughout the 
country. 

Mr. Daniels has been a second-year 
graduate student in physics working un- 
der the supervision of Associate Pro- 
fessor Rolfe E. Glover, III, on research 
related to the superconductivity of thin 
films. He has held a research assistant- 
ship at the University of Maryland this 
past year, and previously served as a 
teaching assistant in physics. He is a na- 
tive of Omaha, Nebraska, and a gradu- 
ate of Dartmouth College. 

Producer for TV Series 

Dr. Charles G. Niemeyer, Associate 
Professor of Speech and Drama at the 
University, acted as an Associate Pro- 
ducer for a series on Channel 26 
(WETA-TV) entitled "Film Classics," 
which began January 29 and continued 
through June. Dr. Niemeyer supplied 
the program with research material for 
program notes and also selected the 
films which were shown, as well as 
furnishing the music. He was also guest 
speaker on several of the programs. 

Dr. Niemeyer has been a film con- 
sultant for some time at the Corcoran 
Gallery of Art. Recently, the Board of 
the Corcoran Gallery appointed him 
officially as its film consultant. Begin- 
ning this fall, Dr. Niemeyer will select 
eight films to be shown at the Gallery 
and will prepare program notes. 

Ai umnus Language Teacher 

Mr. Theodore Macdonald, Maryland, 
'50, has just been appointed to teach 
French and Spanish at the new Adiron- 
dack Community College in Hudson 
I alls, New York. Mr. Macdonald has 
been teaching ever since his student days 
at Maryland where he was president of 
the Cercle francais. 



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Dr. Ni w< omb Promoi i d 

Dr. Robert Newcomb, '48, I'll I).. "57. 
ol the Ball State Teachers College 1 ng 
lish Department, Muncie, Indiana, is 
one of io professors to be promoted 

trom assistant to associate rank. I he- 
action was taken by the State Teachers 
College Board on the recommendation 
of President John F. I mens. 

Dr. Newcomh has published several 

articles in scholarly journals on Ben- 
jamin Franklin and is presently writ- 
ing "A History of the English Maxim" 

as a result ol a sear's study on an 
American Philosophical Society Grant 
in 1960-61. 

Coming to Ball State in 1958, Dr. 
Newcomb received his bachelor's, 
master's and doctor's degrees from the 
University of Maryland, doing half of 
his doctoral work at Princeton Uni- 
versity. He is sponsor of the English 
Club at the College, and, as a member 
of the Student Publications Committee, 
recently revised the by-laws of that 
committee. 



Dr. Draper Elected 

Dr. John D. Draper, '48, Professor and 
Chairman of the Department of Chem- 
istry at Bethany College, Bethany, West 
Virginia, was recently elected President 
of the West Virginia Academy of Sci- 
ence. The election came during the 37th 
annual meeting of the Academy at West 
Virginia University. 

Dr. Draper joined the Bethany faculty 
in February, 1951, and has served as 
Professor of Chemistry and Head of 
the Department since 1954. Since 1954, 
he has served as a research consultant 
for the Stoner-Mudge Corporation, 
Pittsburgh, both for that firm's Mellon 
Institute Fellowship and at the research 
laboratories in Pittsburgh. In addition 
to the West Virginia Academy of Sci- 
ence, he is a member of the American 
Chemical Society, Phi Beta Kappa. 
Alpha Chi Sigma, Sigma Pi Sigma and 
Sigma Xi. 

A native of Hagerstown, Maryland, 
Dr. Draper majored in chemistry at 
Franklin and Marshall College, Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, and was graduated 
from there in 1941. He received his 
Ph.D. at the University of Maryland 
after doing graduate work in Organic 
Chemistry. 



Appointed Assistant Professor 

David M. Lewis, A.B.. '54. M.A.. '56, 
has been appointed Assistant Professor 
of Sociology at Western Michigan Uni- 
versity, Kalamazoo. 

Before joining the staff at Western, 
Mr. Lewis was an instructor in the De- 
partment of Sociology at Michigan State 
University. 

{Continued on next page) 



September-October, 1962 



21 



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Joins Staff of INA 

William Pratt, '62, has joined the staff 
of the Indemnity Insurance Company 
of North America as an Assistant In- 
structor in the Education Department, 
Philadelphia branch. 



Master's Degree 

Gerald U. Liddel, '60, was awarded a 
master of arts degree at commencement 
exercises in June at The Pennsylvania 
State University. 



Mr. Phelps New Assistant 

Norman N. Phelps, '62, of Hyattsville, 
was recently appointed Classification As- 
sistant for Reservation Institutions, De- 
partment of Corrections, Washington 
D. C. 



Appointed Chairman at AU 

Dr. Ray Eldon Hiebert, M.A., '61, 
Ph.D., '62, has been appointed Chair- 
man of the Department of Journalism 
and Public Relations at The American 
University, it has been announced. 

Dr. Hiebert was also promoted to 
Associate Professor. Prior to his four 
years on The American University fac- 
ulty, he taught English and Journalism 
at the University of Minnesota. 

Dr. Hiebert is a graduate of Culter 
Academy in Los Angeles. He earned his 
B.A. degree from Stanford University 
and his M.S. from the Pulitzer Graduate 
School of Journalism at Columbia Uni- 
versity, prior to receiving his M.A. and 
Ph.D. in American Studies from the 
University of Maryland. 

Before entering teaching, Dr. Hiebert 
worked on the editorial staff of news- 
papers in Los Angeles, New York, and 
Washington, D. C. He has worked as 
a free-lance magazine writer and book 
editor and on special news projects for 
NBC News in Washington. He is the 
author of a biography, Ivy Lee: Pioneer 
in Public Relations, now in publication, 
and of numerous magazine articles. 

He has served as a consultant to the 
United States Department of Commerce, 
and to Sigma Press, Washington text- 
book publishers. 

He is a member of Sigma Delta Chi, 
Pi Delta Epsilon, the American Studies 
Association, the Association for Edu- 
cation in Journalism, the Public Rela- 
tions Society of America, and the Amer- 
ican Association of University Pro- 
fessors. 

Dr. Hiebert resides with his wife and 
three children at 3226 Blueford Rd., 
Kensington, Maryland. 



Awarded Graduate Fellowship 

Mrs. Virginia Peaseley Harvey, '29, 127 
West Elm Street, Kent, Ohio, has been 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 Half St., S.E. 

Lincoln 3-8151 

Virginia residents JEfferson 4-1110 

Bethesda OLiver 2-5270 

Baltimore MEdford 3-6500 

Towson VAIley 5-7133 

Glen Burnie SOuthfield 1-0190 

Annapolis COIonial 8-3451 

OFFICES: 

THE DISTRICT, VIRGINIA, 

MARYLAND 



Garden, Farm and Flower Seeds 
Fertilizer and Garden Supplies 

Power and Hand Mowers 
Plants and Bulbs — Insecticides 



F. W. Bolgiano & Company 



1220 H Street, N.W. 
NAtional 8-0091 

411 New York Ave., N.E. 
Lincoln 7-4800 



The gathering place for 
\ Marylanders of Good Taste 



mmmmmimm i 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 

RESTAURANT 
1722 L Street 

(Two doors west of Conn. Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Open 'til Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p.m. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

"Year Round Comfort in Your Home and Office" 

CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 



(Wholesale Distributor) 
501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 



OTis 4-3700 



Arlington, Va. 



^ D. C. Ignition ^ 
Headquarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor troubles 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

• Bowers Batteries — Mallory 
Ignition . . . 



authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

1230 20th St., N.W. 

V. Washington, D. C. _J 



W*i 



HOTEL SUPPLY CO, 

EST - Purveyors of Fine 19 27 

MEATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foodj 
Food Specialties 

To Hotel*. 

Institutions, Ships 

Clubs, Etc. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Washington's Spare Bedroom 


For Your Guests 


3lie | |SJ 

Motor 




TOWN 

utotels 


• Open 24 Hrs. A Day 

• Swimming Pool 

• Phones & Free TV In Each Room 

• Suites, Lounges & Conference Room 

• Wall To Wall Carpeting > 


"•ihctO" 1, 


• Tub & Shower In Each Room 

• Individually Controlled 
Heating & Air Conditioning 

• Free Washer & Dryer 
. • Sightseeing Tours 


On Silver Spiinq V 

76 ROOMS & RESTAURANT 


(jty 


/ On i^kevu Kinase 

95 ROOMS & RESTAURANT 


Cor. 13th St. & Eastern Av. 






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JUniper 8-5801 






OLiver 4-1400 



chosen to receive a graduate fellowship 
awarded by Welleslej College, Welles- 
ley, Mass.. tor the i l ^'>- -63 academic 
year. 
Twenty-five women scholars have 

been granted the awards which will en- 
able them to do advanced stud) and re- 
search at universities ot their choice. 
throughout this country and abroad. 
Most of the fellowship recipients are 
candidates for the Ph.D. degree, and the 

majority are preparing tor careers in 
college teaching. 

Already well established as a teacher 
of physical education, Mrs. Harvey has 
been awarded an Amy Morris Momans 
Fellowship tor advanced study in her 
field. She is working toward the doctoral 
degree at Western Reserve University. 

At various times since 1938 Mrs. 
Harvey has been a member of the fac- 
ulty of Kent State University, where 
since 1954 she has been an associate 
professor in the Division of Health, Phy- 
sical Education, and Athletics. She is a 
graduate of the University of Maryland 
and has the master's degree from the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Articles by Mrs. Harvey have ap- 
peared in the Ohio High School Athlete 
and in the Research Quarterly, and in 
a 1961 publication of the American As- 
sociation for Health. Physical Educa- 
tion, and Recreation. 



College of 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Alumni Notes 

Robert Callaway, '48, is an assistant 
agency director with the State Farm Mu- 
tual Automobile Company and lives at 
34-27 Duke St., College Park. 

Mr. Callaway received his bachelor 
of science degree at Maryland. He is 
married to the former Dorothy Ann 
Jones of Macon, Georgia. 

He was recently honored by State 
Farm for completing 10 years of service 
with the company. 

Col. Thomas P. Corwin. '35, former 
Assistant to the Vice Commander, 
Headquarters, Air Force Systems Com- 
mand, Andrews Air Force Base. Mary- 
land, was recently awarded the First 
Oak Leaf Cluster to the Legion of Merit. 
The presentation was made by AFSC 
Commander, General B. A. Schriever. 

Colonel Corwin left Andrews Air 
Force Base to assume new duties July 
16 as Vice Commander of the Air Force 
Accounting and Finance Center, Den- 
ver, Colorado. 

Army Capt. Robert C. Ebersberger. 
'50, of Baltimore completed the nine- 

( Continued on next page) 



September-October, 1962 



23 



, officer career course at The Fi- 
School, Fort Benjamin Harrison, 

( n June 1. 
iin Ebersberger received ad- 
zed instruction in Finance Corps 
fine, operations and procedures and 
is now qualified for command and stall 
s at the highest levels. 
I he 37-year-old captain is a 1944 
graduate of McDonogh High School. 
He recei\ed his B.S. degree from the 
University of Maryland and his M.B.A. 
degree from Indiana University, Bloom- 
ington. Captain Ebersberger is a mem- 
ber of Sigma Pi fraternity. 



Hardy Appointed 

Time. Inc.. President James A. Linen 
and Chairman of the Board Andrew 
Heiskell have announced the appoint- 
ment of Jerome S. Hardy, '39, to a vice 
presidential post. 

Mr. Hardy has served as Publisher 
of the Time, Inc. Book Division since 
its inauguration in January, 1961, and 
Doubleday & Co.'s Vice President for 
Advertising before he became Director 
of Life's book department in 1959. 

Following his graduation from the 
University, Mr. Hardy worked for sev- 
eral years before World War II in pub- 
lic relations for the automobile industry 
in Washington, D. C, and served with 
the Air Force from 1942 to 1946. Be- 
fore joining Doubleday & Co. in 1947, 
he headed an industrial public relations 
concern operating in Central and South 
America. At Doubleday he served as 
trade Advertising Manager and Direc- 
tor of Advertising before his appoint- 
ment in 1956 as Vice President for Ad- 
vertising. In 1959 he became Director 
of Life's book department and was ap- 
pointed Publisher of the Time, Inc. Book 
Division when it began operation in Jan- 
uary, 1961. He is Chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of Silver Burdett and 
past President of the Publishers AD 
club. 

Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Hugh 
H. Saum, Jr., '36, Timber Cove, Sea- 
brook, Texas, is serving as escort officer 
for a group of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) 
cadets now touring Greece as part of 
the 15th annual International Air Cadet 
Exchange. 

Colonel Saum's group is one of 21 
such touring units of selected CAP ca- 
dets now visiting countries in Europe, 
South America and the Middle East. 

The Colonel will return to his assign- 
ment as Director of Administrative 
Services at Headquarters, Civil Air Pa- 
trol, at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas, 
upon completion of the tour. 



Assistant to Controller 

Arthur E. Biggs, '51, of Stamford, Con- 
necticut, has been named Assistant to 
the Controller and Director of Man- 




See And Drive The '63 

Ford, Falcon and Thunderbird 

At Suburban Maryland's Largest Ford Dealer 



ALMER FORD 

Jamestown Rd. & Hamilton St.-Hyattsville, Md., AP. 7-01 10 



The Largest, Most Modern Sales And Service Facilities In The Area 



Sales Offices Open Daily 'til 9:00 p.m. 
Service Department Open Daily 'til 1:00 a.m. 



NOXZEMA CHEMICAL CO. 

Makers of 

NOXZEMA SKIN CREAM AND COVER GIRL COSMETICS 

for skin health and beauty 

NOXZEMA INSTANT LATHER & BRUSHLESS CREAM 

for shaving 



oA H&ell Pressed SMan R&ears a ^Kat 



OUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 

Neckwear 




109 E. BALTIMORE STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LExington 9-5799 



PeWuf, 0. Wdki+Ua+i 

Class 1928 
Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 
Tree Moving 



Trees 
Sodding 



Shrubs 
Grading 

EVergreen 4-6400 

15710 Colesville Road 

SILVER SPRING. MARYLAND 



BETHESDA CINDER BLOCK 
MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

MASONRY SUPPLIES 

BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 

BETHESDA, MD. 



fuller & b'jaifaert 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



agement Information tor Mobil Oil 
Company. 

Mr. Biggs received a B.S. degree in 
accounting at the University and an 
M.IJ.A. in finance from the Harvard 
Graduate School of Business. He lias 
been a consultant with Mckinscv & 
Company, Inc., and is Vice President 
of the National Society of Business 
Budgeting. Mr. Biggs is married and 
has two sons. 

Cikants Management Assisiwi 

John Caponiti, Jr., '62, of West Hyatts- 
ville, was recently appointed Grants 
Management Assistant for the National 
Institutes of Health in Bethesda. 

Fi.ynn Joins Boucher Company 

H. Timothy Flynn, '57, and a stalwart 
at end on Jim Tatum's forces joined the 
staff of C. Robert (Bob) Boucher, 
Educ, '35. 

Bob, who was a track man in his day, 
has run an appraisal-consultation busi- 
ness in The Investment Building, Wash- 
ington, D. C, since graduation, with the 
exception of a World War II tour in the 
Air Force as a Major. Bob, a Sigma Nu, 
also is active in University affairs, cur- 
rently serving as Vice President of The 
"M" Club. He has also been a Terrapin 
Club member for many years. 

Tim will assist in the appraisal of real 
estate as well as negotiate mortgages for 
the lateral firm, Byrd-Boucher and Com- 
pany, Correspondents for Connecticut 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

Bob's daughter, Carol Robin is pres- 
ently a senior at the University. 



College of 

EDUCATION 



Mary J. A halt 



Institute Receives Grant 

Dr. H. Gerthon Morgan, Director of the 
Institute for Child Study, announced re- 
ceipt of a grant from the W. T. Grant 
Foundation, Inc. to be used for supple- 
mental expenses and the staff profes- 
sional development program. The In- 
stitute has gained an international repu- 
tation as a center for helping teachers 
and school administrators to understand 
the behavioral development of children. 

Special Education Workshop 

Spearheaded by a staff of University of 
Maryland and Montgomery County in- 
structors, about 100 teachers from seven 

(Continued on next page) 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT. MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



THE 

E. A. KAESTNER 

COMPANY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

5401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



KIDUIEU & HIDWELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 

Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

Box 266 

COLLEGE PARK 

GR 4-4500 MD. 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones GRanite 4-B5G5 



ATTENTION STUDENTS 
BOOKS FOR SALE 

Order your current text books, ref- 
erence books, etc., etc., from a whole- 
sale house direct. Hard cover or 
paper back. New or slightly used. 
The largest selection in the market 
on all subjects. Catalog sent on re- 
quest. Send 25t" coin or stamps for 
handling and postage. (Deductible 
from first order.) Prompt service. 
Midwest Book Center, 7635 N. 
Paulina St., Chicago 26, Illinois. 



September-October, 1962 



25 



states worked with 100 mentally-gifted 
80 mentally-retarded children from 
Montgomery County in the Special Edu- 
cation Workshop conducted at Newport 
Junior High School. Wheaton. Dr. Jean 
R. Hebeler, Assistant Professor of Edu- 
>n, College of Education, was Co- 
ordinator for the Workshop. Assisting 
consultants were from the universities 
ol Maryland, Illinois, Pittsburgh, Syra- 
cuse, and Columbia and from the United 
States Office of Education and Florida 
State Department of Education. 



Faculti Activities and Publications 

Dr. J. Paul Anderson, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Education in the College of Edu- 
cation, gave the Commencement address 
at the Prince George's County summer 
high school graduation. 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson's book, Be- 
fore You Teach Children and Teachers 
Guide: Before You Teach Children, has 
been released by The Lutheran Church 
Press in Philadelphia. This book is one 
of the Leadership Education Series 
planned under the Board of Parish Edu- 
cation of the new Lutheran Church of 
America. The Series is the basic intro- 
duction to a new church school curricu- 
lum to be published in 1965. 

Mrs. Margaret Stant, Assistant Pro- 
lessor of Education in Early Childhood 
Education, is serving as National Secre- 
tary of Phi Delta Gamma for 1962-64. 

Dr. Donald Maley, Head of Indus- 
trial Arts Department in the College of 
Education, served as chairman of the 
section on "Graphics — A Leadership 
Tool" at the National Leadership De- 
velopment Conference for Manpower 
Development and Training. This con- 
ference was sponsored by the United 
States Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare; Office of Education, Bu- 
reau of Educational Assistance Pro- 
grams, and Division of Vocational and 
Technical Education. 

Dr. Lucile Bowie, Associate Professor 
in the Institute for Child Study, and Dr. 
H. Gerthon Morgan, Professor and Di- 
rector of the Institute, contributed the 
article "Personal Values and Verbal Be- 
havior of Teachers" to the Journal of 
Experimental Education, Volume 30, 
Number 4, June 1960. 



Ai umni Notes 

Bernard J. G. Caradec, '61, of Hyatts- 
villc has been awarded the silver wings 
ol a United States Air Force navigator. 
He is being reassigned to Mather AFB, 
California, for advanced training. 

Quentin L. Earhart, M.Ed., '61, was 
recently appointed Assistant Superin- 
tendent ol Instruction in the Baltimore 
( ounty public school system. 

Ronald L. Ellis, '60, of Baltimore, is 
pilot of the C-I24 Globemaster trans- 



For Greatest Satisfaction . . . 



Select Shade Trees Now for Fall and 
Winter Planting 




Good gardeners know that 
deciduous trees transplant best 
when dormant. However, they 
are best selected when in foliage. 
Drive out now to our nurseries 
2 miles north of Rockville on 
Route 355 and make your per- 
sonal selection from our many 
OAKS, MAPLES, SWEET- 
GUMS, BIRCHES, WILLOWS, 
BEECHES, LINDENS, and others 
in all sizes. 



A. GUDE SONS COMPANY 1 




LANDSCAPE OFFICE 

1318 Eye St. N. W. 



NURSERIES, 
Rockville, Maryland 

National 8-6880 Poplar 2-6141 

Hours: 9:30-5:00 Monday-Saturday. Closed Sundays. 



Look for trie Sign 




Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2, Md. MU 5-2812 



Bacon for 
breakfast 




Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 




Albert F. Goetze, Inc 

CHOICER MEATS 
Baltimore, Md. 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, Inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Sorority tea ? 
Fraternity party? 




order your favorite 

MRS. SMITH'S PIES 

So good ! So modestly priced ! 

just call 
JU 9-2818 

4 MRS. SMITH'S COLONIAL 
BAKING COMPANY 

Served in the University's own cafeteria 




tor JLroarams 

— V aWoa 
and J\)aaazl 



\azmcs 



Tk 



ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



port carrying astronaut John Glenn's 
spacecraft on its round-the-world exhi- 
bition tour. 

Captain Willard R. Mumford of An- 
napolis, '56, has been named winner of 
the Aerospace Power Study Award in 
the 870 member graduating class at the 
United States Air Force Squadron Offi- 
cers School at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. 

Assistant PROFESSOR AT Ii i inois 

John C. Hadder, '49, who has served 

as an Assistant Professor at Muhlen- 
berg College since 1957, has been ap- 
pointed Assistant Professor of Biological 
Sciences in the undergraduate division 
at the University of Illinois, Chicago, 
beginning September 1, it was recently 
announced by the University of Illinois. 
After receiving his master's degree in 
education in 1949 at the University of 
Maryland, Mr. Hadder went on to re- 
ceive his doctor's degree from Michigan 
State University in 1957. He served as 
graduate assistant at the University of 
Maryland from 1947 to 1950; as a 
research assistant at Brookhaven Na- 
tional Laboratory in Upton, New York, 
from 1951 to 1954; as an assistant at 
Michigan State University from 1955 
to 1956 and an instructor from 1956 
to 1957; and as an Assistant Professor 
at Muhlenberg College from 1957 to 
1962. 



College of 

ENGINEERING 

Russell B. Allen 

Radiation Research Grant 

The Walter F. Joyce Foundation of Dal- 
las, Texas, has given Dr. Joseph Silver- 
man a grant of $25,000 for research in 
radiation. The Grant will help install a 
powerful Van de Graaff generator in 
the laboratories of the Chemical Engi- 
neering Department. With the aid of this 
generator and assistance from a graduate 
student, Ralph Belcher of Silver Spring, 
Dr. Silverman will study the effects of 
radiation on the luminescence of phos- 
phors. 

Tau Beta Pi Elects Funk 

John B. Funk, Chairman of the Mary- 
land State Roads Commission, has been 
initiated as a member of the Maryland 
Beta (University of Maryland) Chapter 
of the Tau Beta Pi Association, in rec- 
ognition of his attainments in the field 
of engineering. 

Commissioner Funk studied Civil En- 
gineering at Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity where he was elected to Phi Beta 

{Continued on next page) 




N 



^H>^H^V| 



A 



&&*■*-% 



"The Paradise of The Pacific" brought io 
Baltimore. Native Hawaiian entertainment, 
taste-tingling Polynesian food, Hawaiian music 
for your dancing pleasure. 

EMERSON 
HOTEL 

KEMP C. GATLING 

Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



KOESTER'S 
TWINS 

PLEASE 



September-October, 1962 



27 



Kappa. His other engineering assign- 
ments include: draftsman for the Amer- 
ican Bridge Co.. City Engineer of 
Brunswick, Maryland. Construction En- 
gineer. Chief Engineer of the State of 
Marj land, and Director of Public Works 
of Baltimore County. 

Chairman Funk also served as a mem- 
ber of the Maryland House of Delegates 
$5-39), Majority Floor Leader of 
the Maryland Senate < 1939-46). Secre- 
tary of State ( 1947). and a member or 
chairman of a large number of state 
committees or commissions before being 
appointed to his present post by Gov- 
ernor Tawes. 



Alumni Notes 

Edmund C. Mayo, M.E., '04, Chairman 
of the Board of the Gorham Corpora- 
tion of Providence, Rhode Island, was 
awarded an honorary degree of Doctor 
of Science in Business Administration 
at the 1962 commencement of Bryant 
College in Providence. 

The University of Maryland awarded 
Dr. Mayo the honorary degree of Doc- 
tor of Engineering in 1956 for a long 
and distinguished career in Mechanical 
Engineering. His career began with the 
Newport News Shipbuilding Company 
from which he progressed to assistant 
to the superintendent of the American 
Locomotive Company of Richmond, 
Virginia, General Manager of the Cam- 
eron-Tennant Machine Works, Vice 
President and General Manager of the 
Viaduct Electric Company of Maryland, 
General Manager of the Worcester 
Pressed Steel Company in New England 
and President and General Manager of 
the American Tube and Stamping Com- 
pany before he joined the Gorham 
Manufacturing Company in Providence 
in 1924 as Vice President and General 
Manager. He became President in 1925, 
a position to which was added the Presi- 
dency of the Alvin Corporation which 
he held until 1959. 

* * * 

William R. Welsh, B.S., '29, EE, '32, 
is Technical Administrator in the Ad- 
vanced Systems Planning Section of 
RCA's Major Systems Division. Except 
for a very short period immediately fol- 
lowing graduation, his career has been 
entirely with Radio Corporation of 
America which has given him many 
broadening opportunities including par- 
ticipation in technical conferences in 
Europe as well as this hemisphere, par- 
ticularly the international aviation field 
and the BMEWS (Ballistic Missile Early 
Warning Systems). 

Mr. Welsh's work with RCA included 
si\ years of design engineering, five years 
as Chief Engineer of the Canadian sub- 
sidiary in Montreal, the war years as 
manager of a group in Camden on air- 
borne electronic equipment and continu- 
ing afterwards as Manager of Engineer- 



Be Really 
Refreshed! 

Have A 

Oofee 




Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Silver Spring 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



A ^B/RoK 



designers 



ORKS 



imcE 



1933 



NE. 



PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



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IN MARYLAND 
IN BALTIMORE 

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V*QUALITY^# 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to whole- 
some, flavorful perfection. Be 
sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
SCHLUDERBERG-KURDLE CO., INC. 



Zmk&te' CoumPuj Vuaum 



ney m 

OLNEY. J MD. 
LUNCHEON* DINNER 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
Daily and Sunday, 
CLOSED MONDAYS I 

Georgia Avenue Extended] 



WHitehall 6-5757 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



INSURED 



SURE SIGN OF SAFETY 

This emblem at Vermont 
Federal means your savings 
are insured by an agency 
of the U. S. Govt. They also 
earn high dividends. Open 
your account here now! 

VERMONT 
FE DERAL 
S AVI NGS 

and Loan Association 

Baltimore at Charles, SA. 7-0250 
Northwood Shopping Center, TU. 9-5551 



ing lor aviation, mobile, microwave and 
scientific instruments. For the past tew 
years his assignments have been more 
toward the administrative and forward 
planning aspects of RCA's Defense 
Electronics business. 

Mr. Welsh has maintained contact 
with the University through his eldest 
daughter, Carol Anne Benton ( nee 
Welsh), a I960 graduate of the College 
of Education, and world-wide confirmed 
contacts with 184 different countries 
through his amateur radio station 
W2PTM. 

Carroll S. James, '30, on September 1 
assumed the duties of Manager of Sys- 
tem Operations on the general head- 
quarters staff of the West Penn Power 
Company. Mr. James, a registered pro- 
fessional engineer in Maryland, has been 
involved in engineering and systems 
operations activity for Potomac Edison 
for the past 28 years and leaves a similar 
position with Potomac Edison at Hagers- 
town. He is familiar with West Penn 
operations as a result of his service on 
intra-company and Allegheny Power 
System Committees. 

* * * 

Col. William E. Roberts, CE '31, is 
now Deputy Post Commander at Fort 




OLES 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



Jjalllmore s Jrioneer Onvelope JManufaclurer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 1500 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 5, D. C. 234-3979 



PLANNING . . . 



for Your 

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517 N. Charles St. 

539-0084 Office 
653-5340 Residence 



AREA CODE 
301 



WILLIAM A. POTTHAST 

5547 Baltimore Nat'l Pike 
744-4475 Office 
744-4641 Residence 



George G. Meade, Maryland. He came 
to his aew post from a tour oi duty as 
professor ol military science at the I 
versus ol West Virginia. 

Colonel Roberts, a native ol the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, went on active duty 
in 1941 with the Sixth Infantry Division 
in the Pacific Theatre. Other assignments 
included the Infantry School at I Oil 

Benning, Georgia, the Army War ( ol- 

lege at Carlisle. Pennsylvania, the 
Seventh Army in I mope, the ( ommand 
and Genera] Staff College at Fort Leav- 
enworth, Kansas, and chief of stall lor 
the Iceland Defense Force. 

* * * 

Charles F. C'ashell. CE '31, received 
a fifth "Outstanding" rating in recogni- 
tion of his work as Assistant Chief of 
the Electrical Department at the U. S. 
Army Engineer Research and Develop- 
ment Laboratories, Fort Belvoir. 

* * * 

Turner G. Timberlake, ME '41, re- 
ceived a Meritorious Civilian Service 
Medal, the Army's second highest award 
to a civilian employee, in recognition of 
his work as chief of the Engineering De- 
partment at the U. S. Army lingineer 
Research and Development Laboratories, 
Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The citation ac- 
companying the medal commended Mr. 
Timberlake for his "service in planning, 
staffing, and supervising the new Engi- 
neering Department" — and "effectively 
overcoming difficulties in revising en- 
trenched policy and operational con- 
cepts, implementing an increased Engi- 
neering mission, and recruiting experi- 
enced engineers from industry in spite 
of salary disadvantages." 

Mr. Timberlake joined the Labora- 
tories in 1956 after being employed for 
a number of years at the Engineer Main- 
tenance Center, Columbus, Ohio. A 
1937 Westinghouse National Scholar- 
ship winner, he is presently a lieutenant- 
colonel in the Army Reserve and served 
on active duty from 1941 to 1945 and 
again from 1951 to 1954. He was the 
recipient of a Secretary of the Army 
fellowship in 1959 and received an "Out- 
standing" rating earlier this year. He 
has authored a number of papers on 
earth moving and construction equip- 
ment. 

Donald L. Murphy, EE '58, was re- 
cently promoted to Staff Engineer at 
the International Business Machines 
Corporation, Endicott, New York. He 
has been with IBM since graduation. 

Sharon L. Henderson, EE '60, first 
woman graduate in Electrical Engineer- 
ing, is now an Assistant Engineer in 
Technical Management with NASA, as- 
signed to the Mercury Project. For two 
years she was employed by Vitro Labor- 
atories, Inc. 

$ * * 

( Continued on next page ) 



September-October, 1962 



29 



Andrew Hobokan. EE "60, is the 
NASA Technical Manager for Project 
Gemini at the McDonnell Aircraft plant 
where the spacecraft is being made. He 
has been quoted in the newspapers about 
the on-board computer, an electronic 
brain about the size of a week-end suit- 
case, under development by IBM, which 
is so essential to the tricky and vital job 
of re-entry of the two-man spacecraft. 



Rodney Chatham. ME '61, was com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
U. S. Air Force at the Officer Training 
School, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. 
He is being reassigned to Kirkland Air 
Force Base, New Mexico. 



David C. Fullarton, EE '61, as of Au- 
gust 1, 1962, assumed the duties of 
Executive Manager of the National Tele- 
phone Cooperative Association of Wash- 
ington, D. C. Before his new appoint- 
ment Mr. Fullarton was with the Na- 
tional Rural Electric Cooperative Asso- 
ciation. 

* * * 

Francis Zeltman, Jr., CE '61, was a 
June, 1962, graduate of the Basic Engi- 
neering Air Force at Wright-Patterson 
Air Force Base and is now Lieutenant 
in the U. S. Air Force. 



Among candidates for advanced de- 
grees of Master of Science at Drexel 
Institute of Technology's June, 1962, 
commencement in Philadelphia were: 
William R. Brown, Jr., EE '50, who re- 
ceived a master's in Engineering Man- 
agement; Jacque E. Goeller, ME '55, 
who received a master's in Mechanical 
Engineering; Michael Stanka, ME '50, 
who was awarded a master's in Engi- 
neering Management; and John J. Za- 
bawa, EE '56, a master's in Electrical 

Engineering. 

* * * 

The master of science degree was con- 
ferred on Paul Y. Hu, ME '61, of Balti- 
more by the California Institute of Tech- 
nology at Pasadena, California, June 
1962. 

* * * 

James Gilchrist Steffler, CE '50, was 
awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Industrial Management at the June, 
1962, commencement exercises at the 
Carnegie Institute of Technology in 
Pittsburgh. 



Joins Chemical Laboratory 

Robert E. Fischer, '60, formerly em- 
ployed by the Dow Chemical Company, 
recently joined the Allied Chemical 
Company's General Chemical Research 
Laboratory in Morris Township, New 
Jersey. 




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the Maryland Magazine 



College of 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Dean Selma Lippeatt 

Gourmet Institute 

The Gourmet Institute, offered in co- 
operation with the College of Home 
Economics, will be held in three sec- 
tions: Fall Section — Saturdays, October 
6, 13, 20, 1962 — American Cuisine: 
Spring Section — Saturdays, March 23, 
30, April 6, 1963 — Oriental Cuisine: 
Summer Section — Saturdays, June 15, 
22, 29, 1963 — European Cuisine. 

The Gourmet Institute is a humanistic 
and esthetic approach to creativity in 
the epicurean arts, emphasizing an ap- 
preciation of cultural influences upon 
food selection, preparation and presen- 
tation. 



Alumni News 

Two 1962 Home Economics alumni 
have been granted Graduate Assistant- 
ships. Miss Claudia Brush will be doing 
graduate work at Pennsylvania State, 
with Textiles and Clothing as her major 
field, and Miss Edith Crammatte, a 
Home Management major, will be do- 
ing her work at Cornell University. 



Japanese Student 

Miss Mihoko Matsuyama, a Japanese 
student and an AHEA Fellow, will be- 
gin her studies in September in the Col- 
lege of Home Economics. 



Faculty Notes 

Dr. Helen I. Brown has been asked to 
serve as a Food and Nutrition Consultant 
for a two-year flight into space, a new 
project being planned in conjunction 
with NASA. 

New faculty members of the College 
of Home Economics, announced by 
Dean Lippeatt, are: Mrs. Margaret Mc- 



kinley, M.S., Columbia University; Miss 
Brunhilde Seidel, M.S., Iowa State; and 
Mrs. Ann Ouidis, M.S., University ot 
Tennessee. All three will teach in the 
Foods and Nutrition Department. 

Dean Selma Lippeatt has been asked 
to serve on the Committee on Interna- 
tional Exchange of Persons and review 
applications of candidates for University 
lecturing and post-doctoral research 
awards in Home Economics, under the 
Fulbright-Hayes Act. 

Dean Lippeatt was also recently ap- 
pointed a member of the AHEA com- 
mittee on Federal Research in Home 
Economics. 



Alumna Named Home Economist 

Phyllis Lorraine Garbis, the top 1961 
home economics graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, has been named 
home economist of the Wilkins-Rogers 
Milling Company, Inc., Samuel H. Ro- 
gers, Jr., president of the Washington 
based company, announced recently. 

Mrs. Garbis will handle the school 
demonstration programs in the com- 
pany's market area, conduct baking tests 
at the plant kitchen, and develop and 
test new recipes for Wilkins-Rogers, 
manufacturer of flour. 

Prior to her appointment, the Wash- 
ington, D. C, girl was a home economist 
with Herbert V. Shuster, Inc. of Boston, 
and before that she was a dietician at 
the George Washington University Hos- 
pital. 

As a home economics major at the 
University of Maryland, Mrs. Garbis 
received the Borden Home Economics 
Scholarship presented to the senior with 
the highest average in the food and nu- 
trition field. She also received the Tri 
Delta Scholarship Grant and the Execu- 
tive Stewards Scholarship Grant. 

She was a member of Phi Kappa Phi, 
Omicron Nu, president of the college 
club chapter of the American Home 
Economics Association and graduated 
first in the College of Home Economics 
at Maryland. 

Mrs. Garbis presently lives with her 
husband at 1635 Massachusetts Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, D. C. 



School of 

LAW 



Pki/i -Winning I [obbi im 

R.N. "Moli'' Pritchard, '47, writes that 
he has been busy in Real I state busi- 
ness, writing articles tor the National 
stamp publications, operating a mail 
order stamp shop and a stamp page 
album company, and mounting stamp 
exhibits lor the national and interna- 
tional shows. 

Mr. Pritchard entered his prize win- 
ning Booklet Pane stamp exhibit and 
his Miniature Sheet stamp exhibit, which 
had just won a Merit Award at the New 
Zealand National Show, in the Royal 
Canadian Internation show at Windsor 
May 3-5, as well as his Perfin stamp 
exhibit, which won many awards at the 
Argentina '62 International stamp show 
at Buenos Aires May 19-29. 

On December 19, 1960, in the na- 
tionally publicized Realtor's Headlines, 
and also in the April 18, 1961, Prentice 
Hall's Real Estate Opportunities and in 
the nationally circulated Chicago Title 
and Trust Company's The Guarantor, 
certain specific details of Mr. Pritchard's 
real estate practice were featured. 

Following his graduation from the 
Law School, Mr. Pritchard worked as 
a legal Editor for West Publishing Com- 
pany in St. Paul, Minnesota. He passed 
his Illinois' Broker Examination in 1959 
and entered the Real Estate field. 



Author's New Book 

Gerald J. Robinson, '56, member of the 
New York and Maryland Bars and co- 
author of Legal Instruments & Federal 
Taxation, has authored a new Law 
publication, Going Public, Successful 
Securities Underwriting, published by 
Clark Boardman Company, Ltd. of New- 
York. 

Mr. Robinson's book is a guide of a 
general nature that covers the areas of 
importance in public financing. It pre- 

(Continued on next page) 



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>cnts business problems, finders and un- 
> riting procedures, securities, regu- 
lations, and tax applications involved 
public offering. 

Michaei Manley Honored 

Michael Manley. '49. who is a claim 
superintendent with the State Farm Mu- 
tual Automobile Insurance Company, 
Baltimore, was recently honored at the 
vrn Regional office of the State 
Farm Company in Charlottesville for 
having completed 10 years of service 
with the company. 

Mr. Manley is married to the former 
Mildred Jean Morne, Nursing, '59. They 
have three children. 



Class Notes 

Captain Richard R. Burgee, '57, of Fred- 
erick, Maryland, an Air Force reserve 
officer, was a member of the recently 
concluded Command and Staff College 
orientation course at the Air University 
at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. 

Captain Burgee was one of 383 se- 
lected reserve officers from a wide range 
of civilian occupations and professions 
to be chosen for the special course. 

First Lieutenant Robert A. Dunham, 
LL.B., '59, of Galesville, Maryland, was 
graduated from the United States Air 
Force's Squadron Officer School at the 
Air University at Maxwell Air Force 
Base, Alabama, on August 3. 

Lieutenant Dunham was selected for 
the special professional officer training 
in recognition of his demonstrated po- 
tential as a leader in the aerospace 
force. 

The Lieutenant is a member of Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha. 

He is being reassigned to Lackland 
Air Force Base, Texas. 



President of PR Council 

John B. Lotz, LL.B., '35, has been 
elected president of the Baltimore Public 
Relations Council. 

Mr. Lotz is industrial relations assist- 
ant superintendent at the Western Elec- 
tric Company's plant on Broening High- 
way. 

Prior to Mr. Lotz's present assign- 
ment, he has served in the manufactur- 
ing end of the business as well as in the 
Purchasing organization where he was 
the Assistant Purchasing Agent. 

Mr. Lotz attended the Johns Hopkins 
University, School of Engineering, and 
the University of Maryland. He is a 
member of the Maryland Bar. 

Mr. Lotz is also a member of the 
Public Relations Society of America, a 
director of the Personnel Administration 
Association ol Baltimore and the Balti- 
more Association of Commerce. 



Chairman of MTA 

Philip Heller Sachs, LL.B., '28, has been 
elected Chairman of the Metropolitan 
Transit Authority, which regulates all 
mass transit facilities in the Baltimore 
metropolitan area. 



School of 

MEDICINE 



Dr. John Wagner 



Howard Hall Progresses 

Active progress in the refurbishment 
and internal reconstruction of Howard 
Hall begins to take shape with antici- 
pated occupancy for the research and 
basic sciences departments of the School 
of Medicine scheduled for mid- 1963. 
Greatly expanded facilities for research 
will be afforded by this new facility and, 
in addition, the medical curriculum will 
now be able to include multiple disci- 
plined laboratory facilities, laboratories 
designed for the performance of many 
different types of experiments. This new 
innovation will enable the students to 
remain in one laboratory area with sev- 
eral departments serving the specially 
designed areas from service zones ad- 
jacent to the principal student labora- 
tory. 



Betatron Unit Being Installed 

A betatron unit is being installed with 
a complete redesigning of the northwest 
junctional wing of the University Hos- 
pital. It now becomes possible to include 
a new betatron to be employed in the 
treatment of deeply-lying cancerous dis- 
eases. The betatron will complement the 
cobalt 60 apparatus which has been so 
successfully employed in the past five 
years and will thus greatly enhance the 
efficiency of the radiation therapy ap- 
paratus possessed by the University Hos- 
pital for the treatment of malignant dis- 
eases. The betatron will be under the 
direction of Doctor Fernando G. Bloe- 
dorn. 



Medical School Class to be 
Expanded 

The medical school class beginning in 
September, 1962, will be increased to 
a size of 1 30 students. Additional class- 
room and laboratory facilities under 
construction or in prospect make the 
increase in the student body possible. 

Alumni Day 

Alumni Day was celebrated on Thurs- 
day, June 7, with addresses by Doctor 




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32 



the Maryland Magazine 



Albin O. Kuhn, who spoke on the ex- 
pansion program of the University of 
Maryland, and Dean William S. Stone, 
who discussed the changing philosophy 
in medical education. Lad F. Grapski 
discussed plans for the development of 
new facilities in the hospital division. 
Doctor Arturo R. Casilli of the Class of 
1914 received the Alumni Honor Award 
and Gold Key presented by Doctor 
Frank K. Morris, President of the Medi- 
cal Alumni Association. 



New Ai.umni Meeting Date 

At the annual meeting of the Medical 
Alumni Association it was moved to 
combine the annual meeting of the Med- 
ical Alumni Association with the annual 
meeting of the Medical Society of the 
University Hospital, the University Hos- 
pital Surgical Association and the Louis 
H. Douglass Obstetrical and Gyneco- 
logical Association. In 1963, the joint 
scientific and Alumni meetings will be 
held in April. Alumni will receive sepa- 
rate communication on this topic. 



Rehabilitation Unit Established 

A Rehabilitation Unit for adult Mary- 
land citizens suffering from handicaps 
has been established at University Hos- 
pital within the Department of Preven- 
tive Medicine and Rehabilitation. 

In announcing the new unit, Lad 
F. Grapski, Director of the Hos- 



pital, said that it was designed to meet 

recommendations made last year to the 
State Planning Commission by the sub- 
committee on chronic illness headed by 
Dr. Allen F. Voshell, in that it coordi- 
nates the evaluation and rehabilitation 
of handicapped persons throughout the 
state. 

Although responsibility for long term 
chronic care cannot be assumed, the 
new unit for adults goes one step beyond 
the hospital's Central Evaluation Clinic 
for Children in providing outpatient 
treatment in addition to evaluation and 
recommendations for treatment. 

One of the objectives of the unit is to 
restore handicapped persons to indepen- 
dent living even though they may not 
be fitted for employment. "It is hard to 
estimate the value to a completely bed- 
ridden person of being able to walk 
again, or to use a wheelchair," Mr. 
Grapski said, "to say nothing of the 
benefit to the person who has been car- 
ing for him." 

The new unit will be headed by Dr. 
Paul F. Richardson, Assistant Professor 
and Head of the Division of Physical 
Medicine and Rehabilitation at the 
School of Medicine. Dr. Aubrey D. 
Richardson, Assistant Professor of Pre- 
ventive Medicine and Rehabilitation, 
will be Medical Director of the unit, and 
Dr. Clara J. Fleischer, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Medicine and Re- 
habilitation, will be the physiatrist. 

Lydia M. Blakeslee, Instructor and 
Research Associate in the Department 
of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilita- 



tion, will direct social work, and Jerome 
Menchel, Instructor ol Physical Medi- 
cine and Rehabilitation, will coordinate 
the unit's activities and prepare a survey 

ol facilities available in other hospitals 
throughout the State in order to avoid 
duplication. 

Because preparation for employment 

is the goal wherever this is possible. .1 
representative ol the State Division ol 

Vocational Rehabilitation will also be 
a member of the team, to assist persons 
who have vocational potential. 

Medical specialists at University Hos- 
pital will serve as consultants. 

Services of the Rehabilitation Unit 
will be available to patients at University 
Hospital who may afterward become 
outpatients at the unit. Other patients 
will be referred from physicians through- 
out the State or from health and welfare 
agencies. 

A standard fee schedule has been 
established for individuals and agencies 
that underwrite such services. 

Mr. Grapski stated that the unit is 
accepting patients now and at the outset 
expects to treat from 10 to 15 patients 
a week. As the number of patients grows, 
the staff may later be increased accord- 
ingly. 

George H. Yeager, M.D., 
1963 President 

George H. Yeager was elected president 

of the Medical Alumni Association for 

1962-63 and Doctor Gibson J. Wells was 

(Continued on next page) 



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33 



nominated president-elect. Vice-presi- 
ts included Doctor Hugh Ward, Wy- 
lie Faw and Philip Insley; Secretary. 
Doctor Francis Borges: Treasurer, Doc- 
tor Howard B. Mays: tor the Board of 
Directors. Harold Biehl, Doctor Renner 
Smelzer and Doctor Joseph D" Antonio. 

Dr. Dodge President of PAMWA 

Dr. Eva Dodge. M.D.. "25, Professor 
of Obstetrics-Gynecology at the Univer- 
sitj of Arkansas Medical Center, was 
recently elected President of the Pan 
American Medical Women's Alliance 
while on a two months' trip working 
with and observing hospitals and medical 
schools in Costa Rica, Panama, Guate- 
mala, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil 
and Paraguay. 

I he Pan American Medical Women's 
Alliance was organized in 1949 by a 
group of women physicians in the Amer- 
icas. As President of the organization, 
Dr. Dodge has also been appointed to 
the Medical Advisory Board MEDICO, 
a non-profit organization developed by 
the late Dr. Tom Dooley which provides 
medical personnel for underdeveloped 
countries. 



UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 



G. Allen Sager 



Three Graduates Awarded Air 
Force Commendation Medals 

Three University College graduates have 
been awarded the United States Air 
Force Commendation Medal recently in 
recognition of meritorious performance 
of duty. 

Lt. Col. Clarence R. Glasebrook, 
B.S. '55, was recognized for his service 
as a member of the Air University areo- 
space briefing team at Maxwell AFB, 
Alabama. 

Major Samuel R. Haggard, B.S. '59, 
was cited for outstanding performance 
of duty while assigned to Chateauroux 
Air Base, France, as aircraft mainte- 
nance officer. 

Chief Master Sergeant Ralph C. Mor- 
gan, B.S. '58, was awarded the medal 
for meritorious service while serving as 
school project officer at Albrook AFB, 
Canal Zone. 

School Completions 

first It. John D. Miles, B.S. '56, was 
named a Distinguished Graduate in the 
April class of 900 USAF officers at the 
Squadron Officers School, Maxwell 
\l B, Alabama. 

( ol. Oscar S. Anderson, Jr., B.S. '54, 
and Col. Fred E. Kycr, B.S. '55, were 



graduated from the USAF's senior pro- 
fessional school, the Air University War 
College, in June. 

Army Lt. Col. Clark O. Irving, B.S. 
'60, and Col. Harlan J. Long, B.S. '57, 
recently completed the senior officer 
advanced operations course at the Army 
Command and General Staff College. 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Maj. Donald E. Allen, B.S. '60, Lt. 
Col. Eugene J. Braun, B.S. '60, Capt. 
Richard R. Duemler, B.S. '61, Lt. Col. 
Herbert S. Moore, B.S. '60, and Maj. 
Wilbert F. Higgins, B.S. '60, were 
among a class of 411 U. S. Army offi- 
cers and 33 officers from allied nations 
who recently completed the 16-week as- 
sociate course at the Army Command 



and General Staff College, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas. 

Maj. Frank A. Buchanan, Jr., B.S. 
'61, Maj. Charles L. Stevenson, B.S. '58, 
both of the Air Force, and Army Maj. 
Ebbin P. Scott, Jr., B.S. '58, M.B.A. 
'61, were graduated from the Air Force 
Command and Staff College at the Air 
University, Maxwell AFB, Alabama, in 
June. 

Army Lt. Col. Jay P. Thomas, B.S. 
'50, recently graduated from the Armed 
Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Roman Joseph Lutz, B.S. '58, re- 
ceived the Master of Arts degree from 
the State University of Iowa in Feb- 
ruary. 



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the Maryland Magazine 




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Promotions 

The following University College 
graduates have been recently promoted 
in their respective branches of the armed 
services: Howard A. Handran, B.S. '60, 
from Lt. Col. to Col.; Oscar A. Ander- 
son, B.S. '54, from Lt. Col. to Col.; 
William L. Dodge, B.S. '57, from Maj. 
to Lt. Col.; Murray W. Cole, B.S. '58, 
from Maj. to Lt. Col.; Earl Ingram, 
B.S. '61, from Maj. to Lt. Col.; James 
M. McGovern, B.S. '58, from Maj. to 



Lt. Col.; Stanley J. Nixon, B.S. '59, from 
Maj. to Lt. Col.; Robert L. Kane, B.S. 
'55, from Maj. to Lt. Col.; Donald M. 
Thompson, B.S. '50, from Lt. Col. to 
Col.; Leslie A. Smith, B.S. '57, from 
Lt. Col. to Col.; Benedict A. Karnosky, 
B.S. '60, from Lt. Col. to Col.; Lucius 
Theus, B.A. '56, from Maj. to Lt. Col.; 
and Gordon E. Mulvey, B.S. "61, from 
Maj. to Lt. Col. 

Maj. Arthur E. Allen, USAF, was 
promoted to the rank of Professor of 
Air Science at Brown University. 



( AKI VI i Nun i v, Jk. 

Army Major (arlylc Nihley, Jr.. A & S. 
'58, of Laurel, a medical entomologist, 
died May \'». 1962 m a traffic accidenl 

Oil Route 1, two miles south ol laurel. 

Major Nibley was graduated from 
Woodrow Wilson High School, Wash- 
ington, in 1943, and served for three 
years as an Army enlisted man in the 
South Pacific in World War II. Alter 
his discharge, he entered American 
University and was graduated in 1950 
with a bachelor of science degree. He 
re-entered the Army the same year as an 
ollicer. He served in Korea in 1950-5) 
and later attended the University of 
Maryland, where he received a master 
of science degree. Major Nibley re- 
turned to this area from an assignment 
in Okinawa last May, assigned to the 
University of Maryland, where he was 
majoring in medical entomology and 
working for a doctor of philosophy 
degree. 

He leaves his wife, Betty Jean; two 
sons; a daughter; two brothers, a sister; 
and his mother. 

Edwin F. Darner 

Edwin F. Darner, Engr., '22, of Hagers- 
town, Maryland, died April 9, 1962. 

T. B. Mackall 

T. B. Mackall, Agr., "08, of Mackall, 
Maryland, died April 6, 1962. Mr. 
Mackall was for many years Treasurer 
of Christ Episcopal Church, of which 
he was a life-long member, and Senior 
Warden at the time of his death; a past 
Vice President and member of the 
Board of Directors of the Farm Bureau; 
and a charter member of the Calvert 
County Historical Society. Funeral serv- 
ices were held April 8 at Christ Epis- 
copal Church, Port Republic. Burial was 
in the Church cemetery. Mr. Mackall 
is survived by his wife, the former Mary 
Evelyn Parran; two daughters; two 
brothers; and two grandsons. 

Carroll E. Tauszky 

Carroll E. Tauszky, Engr., '09, died 
February 18, 1962. at the age of 74 
years. Funeral services were held Feb- 
ruary 22 at Huntington, West Virginia. 
Mr. Tauszky is survived by his wife. 
Artha, now residing at 420 E. First St. 
Huntington, West Virginia; and two 
sons, presently on active duty with the 
United States Air Force. 

{Continued on next page) 



September-October, 1962 



35 



Lemuel F. Zerkel 

Lemuel Ferdinand Zerkel, A & S, '06, 
U S. Park Commissioner in Shenan- 
doah National Park since 1939, died 
April 17. 1962 at Page Memorial Hos- 
pital. Luray, Virginia, after a short ill- 
ness. He was 76. As Page County di- 
rector of Shenandoah Valley. Inc., Mr. 
Zerkel helped form the Park in the 
I930's. He operated a lumber business 
and was a real estate dealer in Luray. 
He leaves his wife, Mrs. Helen Minis 
Zerkel; a daughter; a son; and a sister. 

Frank W. Smith 

Frank W. Smith, who served as fore- 
man of the machine shop in the Physics 
Department at the University of Mary- 
land since September, 1954, died June 
3, 1962, at Washington Sanitarium after 
two months of critical illness. Mr. Smith 
died on his 59th birthday. 

Mr. Smith was a gifted craftsman 
and often remained long hours after 
work to help individual faculty members 
and students with special problems in- 
volved in construction of their research 
and teaching apparatus. 

During Mr. Smith's career as fore- 
man, the shop of the Physics Depart- 
ment increased four times over in num- 
ber of workers and more than tripled in 
the quantity of machines and tools. Mr. 
Smith developed the machine shop into 
a flexible tool available for basic ex- 
perimental research and the develop- 
ment of teaching equipment. 

Mr. Smith is survived by his wife, 
Catherine, and two sons. 



William C. Gibbs 

William Campbell Gibbs, A & S, '61, a 
medical student in the top third of his 
class at the University of Maryland 
Medical School, died May 19, 1962, at 
the University Hospital in Baltimore 
after brain surgery. He was 23. 

Mr. Gibbs is survived by his parents, 
Malcom M. and Tommie A. Gibbs, of 
4712 Hunt Avenue, Chevy Chase, and 
a brother. 



William F. Cassedy 

William F. (Bill) Cassedy, A & S, '48, 
of East Grccnbush, New York, died 
May 26, at the Albany, New York, Med- 
ical Center after an operation. 

Mr. Cassedy won both the Maryland 
and [District of Columbia schoolboy golf 
championships while he attended Mont- 
gomery Blair High School, where he also 
Starred in baseball and basketball. After 
World War II. he helped organize the 
University of Maryland's golf team. 
After his graduation from the Univer- 
sity, he had been a bacteriologist with 
the Sterling-Winthrop Company. Mr. 
( assedy also managed a Little League 
baseball team and was active in civic 



work in East Greenbush. He is survived 
by his wife, Mary; two sons, his par- 
ents, and a brother. 

George Eli Bennett 

Dr. George Eli Bennett, M.D., 09, died 
July 17 at his home in Baltimore at the 
age of 77. 

Dr. Bennett, one of baseball's leading 
physicians, was a member of the medical 
profession for 50 years and a longtime 
professor at Johns Hopkins School of 
Medicine. Among his patients in earlier 
years were Dizzy Dean, Allie Reynolds, 
Lefty Gomez, Dixie Walker, Joe Di- 
Maggio, Phil Rizzuto, Pee Wee Reese, 
Red Rolfe and Pete Reiser. 

Dr. Bennett's skill at treating baseball 
injuries was a result of experience gained 
when he played semi-pro ball in his 
youth. 

Dr. Bennett served as president of the 
American Orthopedic Association and 
the American Academy of Orthopedic 
Surgeons. Under his direction, the first 
iron lung center in the world was organ- 
ized at Children's Hospital in the early 
1940's. 

Thomas Howard Evans 

Thomas Howard Evans, Phy. Ed., '42, 
athletic director of the Cambridge, 
Maryland, High School, died August 5 
of an apparent heart attack. He was 52. 

Mr. Evans taught at the Cambridge 
Seminary, Cambridge Junior High 
School, and, since 1958, was a teacher 
and athletic director of the Cambridge 
High School. 

A bachelor, Mr. Evans is survived by 
six sisters. 

Joseph Bransky 

Joseph Bransky, Phar. D., '14, School 
of Pharmacy, died in Philadelphia on 
February 17, 1962. 

Dr. Bransky was a retired supervisor 
of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics in 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Dela- 
ware. He had been in the Bureau for 
41 years prior to his retirement in 1960. 

After the Second World War he was 
sent to Japan by the U. S. Army to study 
the illicit narcotics trade. He was later 
made a life member of the Japanese 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

Dr. Bransky originated the mass-raid 
technique in the early 1950's, sometimes 
arresting up to 100 suspects at one time. 

He was a member of the International 
Chiefs of Police Association and of the 
International Association of Identifica- 
tion. 

He was a native of Baltimore and at- 
tended the 1961 banquet of the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy. 

Theresa B. Nicht 

Theresa B. Nicht, Ed., '29, of Frostburg, 
Maryland, died March 11. 



Estel Kelley 

Estel C. Kelley, LL.B., '24, of Cumber- 
land, Maryland, died July 10. He was 
60 years old. 

Mr. Kelley, a Republican member of 
the House of Delegates, was a native of 
Westport. He had practiced law in Cum- 
berland since 1924 and was former 
president of the Allegany County Bar 
Association. His wife, the former Delta 
Coulter, died earlier. He is survived by 
five children. 

Walter C. Capper 

Walter C. Capper, LL.B., '06, of Cum- 
berland, Maryland, died on January 21, 
at Cumberland. 

Henry H. O'Neill 

Henry H. O'Neill, Agriculture, '12, re- 
tired Justice of the Peace and former 
trial magistrate at Hyattsville, died at 
Mount Alto Veterans Hospital after a 
long illness. 

Joseph Mason 

Joseph L. Mason, Agriculture, '36, a 
Stockbroker in Silver Spring, died at 
Mount Alto Hospital. Funeral services 
were held at Fort Myer Chapel and 
burial was in Arlington Cemetery. 

William K. Robinson 

William K. Robinson, A & S, '13, of 103 
North Beacon Street, West Hartford, 
Connecticut, died March 4, 1962. Burial 
was in Christiansburg, Virginia. Mr. 
Robinson was the owner of the W. K. 
Robinson, Inc., Oil Company. He is 
survived by his wife. 

Harry G. Neumann 

Harry G. Neumann, Agriculture, '49, 
died recently at his home in Royal Oak, 
Maryland. For several years he was 
engaged in food processing on the East- 
ern Shore. 

Clayton P. Harley 

Clayton P. Harley, Agriculture, '23, died 
recently after a long illness. He retired 
from the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture in 1961 after a colorful career in 
research in fruit production. 

Morris L. Yubas 

Morris L. Yubas, M.D., '09, Philadel- 
phia ophthalmologist, died April 20, 
1962, at his home at 250 S. 17th Street, 
Philadelphia. Dr. Yubas was one of the 
founders of what is now the Pennsyl- 
vania College of Optometry. 

Claude C. Smink 

Claude D. Smink, M.D., '09, of 914 
Riverside Drive, Salisbury, Maryland, 
died April 15. He was 74. 



36 



the Maryland Magazine 



DID YOU KNOW 

that 



The University of Maryland through its non-tax supported Uni- 
versity College serves the citizens of Maryland throughout the State 
and overseas? 



• The facilities of the University have been extended to 52 state, 
federal, and industrial centers within Maryland. 

• Last year 34,000 part-time students registered for courses offered 
at U. S. military installations on four continents. Many of these military 
students are from the Old Line State. 

• Annually 6 to 10,000 people attended various Conferences and 
Institutes ranging from Space Technology to Fine Arts to Law Enforce- 
ment. 



Have you or your group taken advantage of what your state uni- 
versity has to offer through its University College? 

For further information regarding evening courses write or phone 
University College WArfield 7-3800, Extension 7111; or for Confer- 
ences and Institutes WArfield 7-3800, Extension 7117. 






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MARYLAND HOSPITALITY 

When playing hosts to guests from out of town, Baltimoreans are now 
frequently including a visit to McCormick's Friendship Court in their tour 
of picturesque and historic sites. Few places afford a more sweeping view 
of the Baltimore harhor as it stretches toward storied Fort McHenry. 

McCormick & Company's hostesses, all well versed in the historical 
and romantic lore of the spice and tea trade, are ever ready in Friendship 
Court to assist you in providing a friendly welcome to Baltimore. Also 
as part of McCormick hospitality, a refreshing cup of tea or coffee awaits 
"iiests in Ye Olde Tea House. 



McCORMICK & CO., INC.— "The House of Flavor 






Volume XXXIV Number Six • November-December 1962 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 







magazine 



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1 



HAVE YOU SUPPORTED THE COLLEGE OF YOUR CHOICE? 



America needs ideas to hold its place among 
nations. Ideas stimulate progress ... in science 
and invention, in business and trade, in the cul- 
tural impact America makes on world affairs. 

But are we heading for trouble? Most good 
ideas come from higher education. And colleges 
aren't keeping up with population growth. 
Some are overcrowded and, in ten years, appli- 
cants will double. 

It would be tragic if a great nation like ours 



should fall behind because it lacked ideas, and 
leaders. Our colleges must have more class- 
rooms and libraries, up-to-date laboratory- 
equipment and many more top-quality teachers. 

Don't let this happen. Give to the college of your 
choice— help it further America's future. 



To find out how the college crisis affects you, send for a free 
booklet to: HIGHER EDUCATION, Box 36, Times Square Sta- 
tion, New York 36, N.Y. 



lOMtR EDUCATION 




Published as a public service in cooperation with 
The Advertising Council and the Council for Financial Aid to Education 



j^Za 



Hrre it omOHT 



the 




magazine 



]VI»r~;yl<\ricl 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXIV Number 6 

The Cover: The University of Maryland Madrigal Singers have achieved 
a growing reputation as a distinguished musical group. Officially organized 
as a class in the Department of Music in 1959, they have made numerous 
appearances at University affairs and on television stations WBAL in 
Baltimore and WTOP, WRC and WTTG in Washington. They have also 
produced programs for the Voice of America and for the Armed Forces 
overseas. Among their personal appearances the Singers are well known 
for their performance, by invitation of the Secretary of State, in honor of 
all the Chiefs of Diplomatic Missions and their wives in the State Dining 
Room in the new Department of State Building. 



Z* The Importance of Scholarship 

D Maryland Holly Decorates the American Christmas Scene 

D Homecoming Victory 

O A Reference Library for Alumni 

11 C. E. Tutfle 

J. Z* The Alumni Diary 

1 D Alumni and Campus Notes 

J. J America's Musical Life Comes of Age 

Z*\J Through the Years 



BO ARD OF REG ENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
HARRY E. HASSLINGER '33, President 
DR. EDWARD STONE, JR., '25, Vice-President 
MRS. ERNA RIEDEL CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-Prefident 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, '38, Executive Secretary 
VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTORS 
MRS. H. B. GILLESPIE 

411 Range Road 

Baltimore 4, Md. 

828-9050 



RICHARD F. ROSS 
6136 Parkway Drive 
Baltimore 12. Md. 
435-6767 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3,1879.-$3.00peryear-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



President Elkins addresses 
the third Annual Honors Convocation on 



THE IMPORTANCE 




OF SCHOLARSHIP 



Excepting Commencement, this is the most important aca- 
demic event of the year, and I am pleased to be the main 
speaker. Perhaps I should not be, since I am in a posi- 
tion to know that I was far down the line when the Con- 
vocation Committee began to look for someone to address 
you. By a process of declined invitations, 1 was selected. 
Notwithstanding the circumstances, I was a willing party 
to the draft, as it afforded me an opportunity to talk about 
scholarship which is the main purpose of any University 
worthy of the name. 

The terms scholar and scholarship have been used and 
are defined in several ways. We hear of athletic scholar- 
ships, music scholarships, legislative scholarships, and a 
host of others, although they may have little, if any, re- 
lation to high academic performance. Use of the word 
"scholarship" in referring to various kinds of student aid, 
often for worthy purposes, is confusing and misleading. 
Of course, we expect all who receive aid to be students, 
but we do not expect them to be "scholars" in one sense 
of the word. 1 am thinking of scholarship as high academic 
performance either in study, teaching or research. In this 
connection, it is appropriate to discuss the high academic 
performance which you have shown, although all of us 
recognize that scholarship is usually associated with high 
academic achievement over a much more extended period 
of time. 



Incidentally and parenthetically, this occasion may be 
rather timely. It comes at a time (by chance I assure you) 
when we have just lost two football games, and it is not 
surprising that while I was preparing this talk someone 
reminded me that we could now turn to scholarship with 
a vehemence. In any event, our concentration on academic 
matters will no longer be disturbed by the incipient bowl 
fever which was beginning to rise on and off the campus. 

Tonight we are recognizing academic performance and 
honoring students who have applied their talents. You 
have demonstrated your ability to make an exceptional 
record and your desire to excel. We are also pleased to 
recognize the parents, relatives and friends of the honored 
students — particularly the parents. Most mothers and 
fathers place at the top of their mental list of desires a 
good education for their children, and they hope that 
their children can and will take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities afforded them. Parents should be grateful for un- 
usual ability, but perhaps they should be even more grateful 
when their children perform at a high level since perform- 
ance is somewhat unpredictable and subject to many en- 
vironmental influences and factors. Disappointment is not 
uncommon. When expectations or hopes are fulfilled, par- 
ents have a right to be proud, to take some credit for 
success, and they should be as quick to praise as they 
might have been to criticize. We arc glad that you are 



The Maryland Magazine 



here this evening to share the honors and to enjoy the 
satisfaction of knowing that your sons and daughters pos- 
sess both ability and the will to go above the average level. 

We are also pleased to have with us three special guests 
who will be cited for their achievements. They have been 
selected not because they are famous or rich — they may 
be both — but because of noteworthy service. There are 
many people in this country who contribute immensely 
in many fields who neither gain nor seek fame. We are 
especially pleased that the awards to be made arc given 
in the name of the Board of Regents. This suggests, and 
rightly so, that the Regents' primary interest is in accom- 
plishment — high academic achievement by students and 
outstanding service by prominent citizens. 

In this age of acceleration, it is not easy to achieve dis- 
tinction. As knowledge accumulates rapidly and competi- 
tion becomes keener, it is increasingly difficult to get to 
the top and stay there. In many subjects a high achieve- 
ment of twenty or even ten years ago is inadequate today. 
Despite the self-appointed critics of education, there has 
been notable progress. I am often amazed, and sometimes 
embarrassed, by the content of high school courses. It is 
not that I am convinced that good students of yesterday 
would fail today; it is because I realize that, in general, 
today's students have to learn a lot more than was required 
of students a few years ago. This striking fact causes me 
to appreciate more fully than ever before the capacity of 
the human mind and the fact that human beings seldom 
work up to full capacity. 



THE PURSUIT OF SCHOLARSHIP 

There are a number of influential factors in the suc- 
cessful pursuit of scholarship. The most important, it 
seems to me, are ability and aptitude, self-discipline, and 
the urge to excel — and all of these need to be applied for 
any successful endeavor. A relatively small percentage of 
students have superior ability, and they are deeply in- 
debted to their parents and ancestors. Some of them, at 
least, seem to make excellent records without great effort, 
just as some people seem to be able to make a lot of 
money without extraordinary exertion. Most of the high 
potentials, however, have to work hard to remain at the 
top. This is so because of the amount of work required 
and, perhaps of even more importance, because they are 
being pushed by extraordinary application on the part of 
ambitious students with average ability. 

These efforts are made possible by self-discipline. The 
successful student has learned to control himself. When 
there is a choice, as there is in most colleges and univer- 
sities, he not only recognizes the main purpose of going 
to college, but he also pursues it with diligence. Fortu- 
nately, self-discipline can be developed; but, unfortunately, 
there are too many students who would like to learn how 
to study without studying. The student who has disciplined 
himself may improve his reading skill and make some use 
of mechanical teaching devices, but he does not attempt to 
substitute teaching aids for fundamental requirements in 
the learning process. 

In reaching for the top, the urge to excel is an invaluable 
asset. This is often called motivation and it is as difficult 
to measure as it is to determine its origin. It seems to be 
a part of some people. Others do not have a self-starter 
and require a "cranking" by some outside source. It is 



I Ik- Honors Convocation 

Three hundred and fifty-nine students were recog- 
nized lor outstanding academic achievement at the 
third annual Honors Convocation, November 16, 

in the Reckon! Armory at College Park. An audi 
ence of 1,200 parents, (acuity and friends gathered 
to recognize student achievement oi at least a 3.5 
cumulative grade average. 

Distinguished Service Awards were conferred upon 
two Maryland Citizens and an alumnus by the ho. ud 
of Regents tor their contributions to their communi- 
ties. State and University. Board Chairman Charles 
P. McCormick made the Aw arils to Adelyn Dohme 
Breeskin, and Dr. Akin Thalheimer, both oi Balti- 
more, and Sterling Rullin Newell, of Falls Church, 
Virginia. 

University President Wilson H. I.lkins addressed 
the Convocation on "The Importance of Scholarship." 
Vice President for Academic All airs R. l.ee Horn- 
bake presided. 

Mrs. Breeskin was cited "as one of the few women 
serving as a curator of a large city museum and one 
who has made a distinct contribution to the culture 
of Baltimore City and the State of Maryland." 

A noted writer, academician, lecturer and art au- 
thority, Mrs. Breeskin was associated with the Balti- 
more Museum of Art as Curator. Acting Director 
and Director from 1930 until her appointment as 
Director of the new Washington Gallery of Modern 
Art in July. 

She was decorated by the Italian Government and 
awarded the '"Star of Solidarity" in 1954 for pro- 
moting intercultural betterment, elected a Benjamin 
Franklin fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Lon- 
don, in 1960 and appointed U. S. Commissioner in 
charge of the American Pavilion at the 30th Venice 
Biennale Exhibition during the same year. Also dur- 
ing 1960, she was the recipient of the Afro-American 
Award for superior public service without thought of 
gain. 

Mr. Newell was recognized "as a Maryland alum- 
nus who has headed with distinction an important 
national program under the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture." 

A member of the Class of '22, Mr. Newell has 
had a distinguished career in agriculture. Prior to 
retirement, he served as Director of the Agricultural 
Estimates Division and Chairman of the U. S. Crop 
Reporting Board for the Agricultural Marketing 
Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. He has 
also served as Chief of the Livestock Branch and 
Assistant Chief of the Market Research Division, 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

Dr. Thalheimer was cited for his outstanding con- 
tributions to the welfare of the citizens of the State. 
A former Chairman of the Council of Social Agen- 
cies of the State Department of Public Welfare, he 
has been extremely active in many philanthropic and 
cultural agencies. 

He is Vice President of the American Trading and 
Production Corporation and Chairman of the Mary- 
land Board of Public Welfare. Formerly President 
of the Lord Baltimore Filling Stations. Dr. Thal- 
heimer has served also as President of the Associated 
Jewish Charities and the Board of Jewish Education. 

Dr. Thalheimer is the author of Existential Meta- 
physics published in 1960. 



November-December, 1962 



not. however, unrealistic to believe that the urge can be 
cultivated. In view of the satisfaction which comes to all 
individuals when they do well, it is reasonable to assume 
that thej can do something about it. One does not need 
to wait aimlessly for some impetus to strike him. One may 
need simply to get more deeply involved in a subject. The 
urge to excel is often influenced by outside stimuli, but 
it must be developed within the individual. Like other 
qualities, it grows when attended properly. 



UNIVERSITY'S RESPONSIBILITY TO DEVELOP 

SCHOLARSHIP 

It has been said by educational critics that the only real 
crime that a college can commit is to waste the time and 
talents of its students. In spite of the cold and hot wars 
that confront and threaten us, I suspect that the final test 
of democracy will be on the question of how fully the tal- 
ents of all of the people have been developed. Certainly, 
there can be no doubt as to what should be given the 
highest priority. The extent to which we cultivate human 
resources will determine our security and our prosperity. 
Educational institutions can accept some responsibility for 
the full development of the individual; but, their central 
purpose must be on intellectual growth. The human mind, 
if directed by virtue, can accomplish wonders for the 
advancement of civilization. In the area of the intellect, 
man is unique. He possesses powers which, even in this 
enlightened age, are largely untapped. The remarkable 
discoveries of the past will appear as only a preface to what 
man may accomplish in the future. His attributes may be 
applied in the writing of beautiful music, in the achieve- 
ment of economic hope for the underprivileged, in the 
enlightened management of industrial and commercial or- 
ganizations; also in the prevention of dread diseases, and 
in probing the mysteries of the universe. All kinds of minds 
arc needed to make progress. The universities should not 
ignore the direction of the intellect, but they must concen- 
trate upon the development of our most promising intel- 
lectual resources. 

To achieve significant results there is an urgent and 
almost desperate need for leadership. While a superior 
academic record does not necessarily mean that one will 
become a leader in his field, it does mean that the chances 
arc better than they arc for one who does not perform at 
a high level. Scholarship is a sign of certain exceptional 
qualities, and it is the university's obligation to identify 
and strengthen the qualities which are essential to leader- 
ship in every field. Only in this way can we expect real 
progress and hope for an improvement in man's relations 
with man. 



FACTOR IN INDIVIDUAL HAPPINESS 

Scholarship is also an important factor in individual 
happiness. In a highly competitive economy each person 
must be equipped to make a living and to stand on his own 
feet in times of adversity as well as prosperity. Performance 
in college is considered to be the most important criterion 
for judging what the individual will do outside of college. 



Indeed, there are notable exceptions, but they are decreas- 
ing as conditions become more complex. Your perform- 
ance, if maintained, will give you preferential treatment 
in starting a career; and, if you are dependable, have 
initiative and have learned how to learn you will continue 
to make progress. If you have been only a so-called 
'"grade-hound," you may find that grades are not enough 
to assure success. If you have learned to think for your- 
self, however, and to distinguish between a mere recitation 
of facts and the meaning, interpretation and application 
of them you will profit by your educational attainments. 

Tonight we honor your academic achievement over a 
period of one year, hoping that it is prophetic of future 
accomplishments. We do not say that this is a passport 
to fame and fortune; we merely say that you are on the 
right track and we commend you for it. We know that 
grades are not everything — that social, spiritual and phy- 
sical development is essential to the making of a useful 
man or woman. We also know that there are trained fools 
and that there always will be, and that some of them have 
graduated magna cum laude. But, we know that the over- 
whelming majority of honor students have continued to 
excel in college and in their chosen professions. 



ENCOURAGEMENT OF SCHOLARSHIP 

It is inevitable that the University will be judged by its 
peers and by others. The best criterion for a judgment is 
the performances of its students and graduates. To produce 
extraordinary results the University must have extraordi- 
nary talent. It must not be seriously handicapped by a mass 
of students who do not possess academic aptitudes or in- 
terests. The University is attempting, therefore, to attract 
ever more promising high school graduates and is following 
a policy toward low achievers that will enable the faculty 
to do a better job with those who can and will achieve. 
We have made some progress, and we recognize that we 
need to do more for those who have the qualities of leader- 
ship, even if we have to do less for those whose perform- 
ance is questionable. To avoid wasting the time and talent 
of students, the University must, at times, depart from 
traditional practices. It must conceive and inaugurate plans 
that display creative thinking. There is a need to preserve 
what man has learned, but there is also a need to project 
man into the future. Although difficult, it is a task that 
must be undertaken if we are to provide the kind of leader- 
ship that will be needed in the years ahead. 

You, and those who follow your example, merit our 
encouragement, our gratitude and our praise. You have 
helped yourselves and you have helped to raise the level 
of the University. In all probability you will derive tangible 
benefits from the application of your ability; but, notwith- 
standing the importance of material things, your main 
reward will come from an inner feeling of satisfaction. It 
will come from a realization that you have done your 
best, and that you have taken advantage of the most 
precious privilege of free men — the opportunity to achieve 
personal success and to perpetuate and improve a social 
order which is the only hope for a better tomorrow. 

Congratulations, and may the future be even brighter 
than the past. 



The Maryland Magazine 



Maryland Holly Decorates the 
American Christmas Scene 



ARRY DENGLER, EXTENSION FORESTER AT THE UNI- 

vcrsity, has a very special way of wishing his 
friends and acquaintances a Merry Christmas: he 
gives them holly. 

Since the 1800's, Maryland holly has provided Amer- 
icans living in the eastern half of the country with wreaths 
used during the Christmas season. 



As Maryland faculty, students and alumni 
prepare for the happy holidays ahead, the 
editors of The Maryland Magazine have writ- 
ten this short feature as their way of wishing 
all readers a very Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year. 



And Mr. Dengler, of Holly Hollow, Maryland, is the 
acknowledged holly expert in this area. 

Guest editor of Handbook of Hollies, published by the 
National Horticultural Magazine, Mr. Dengler has received 
recognition from the Holly Society, the American Forests 
Magazine, and numerous area newspapers. 

Mr. Dengler cannot stress enough the important role 
holly plays in bringing cheer to the Christmas season, and 
to every day of the year. For example, when the late Mrs. 
Eleanor Roosevelt made her first return trip to Wash- 
ington after her husband's death, Mr. Dengler sensed how 
unhappy her arrival would be, and was on hand with a 
special spray of holly, though he had never met the wife 
of the late Franklin D. Roosevelt. Onlookers reported that 
Mrs. Roosevelt's smile was bright enough to light an en- 
tire tree! 

Launching into an explanation of the wreathmaking 
business, Mr. Dengler said that the Delaware-Maryland- 
Virginia Peninsula has furnished holly for the eastern half 
of the United States since the 1800's. "Fruitland, Mary- 
land, is the only place in the world where holly auctions 
are held each year, usually on three successive Wednesdays 
and Saturdays before Christmas," he said. 

"Shortly after Thanksgiving, wreathmakers search 
swamps and woods for trees having a great number of 
berries," explained Mr. Dengler. "They gather berried 
sprigs of holly three to six inches long and remove the 




leaves. Four to eight sprigs arc wired together to form a 
cluster of berries approximately four inches in diameter. 

"Wreathmaking is usually a family affair," continued 
Mr. Dengler. "When the time of auction draws near, holly 
from the larger and greener trees are gathered by the men. 
Hoops are formed from switches of gum or maple and 
wreaths are started by tying three to six sprigs of holly 
to the hoop with holly wire. Clumps of twigs are then 
placed on the hoop to cover the ends. To finish off the 
wreath, four clusters of berries are spaced evenly around 
it, the result being a wreath approximately 14 inches in 
diameter. Experienced wreathmakers are able to complete 
a wreath in about 10 minutes." 

When the day of auction arrives, cars, station wagons 
and trucks line up and trunk lids are promptly and proudly 
lifted to display the wreaths. 

"By 10 o'clock in the morning, everyone is anxious to 
get started," said Mr. Dengler. "The first vehicle in line 
moves up to the group of buyers and to the auctioneer, 
who collects a flat fee of 50 cents a load. The buyers hold 
up and examine the wreaths carefully, and bid on a per- 
wreath basis. Prices vary from 40 cents to over a dollar 
a wreath. Auctions are fast-moving because buyers are 
anxious to move their wreaths to market. 

"Unfortunately," concluded Mr. Dengler as he gathered 
up holly twigs from his desk, "the wreathmaking industry 
is slowly declining. Gathering holly is hard work and the 
profits are not great. It's mostly the old folks who are still 
engaged in the art of wreathmaking." 

On a happier note, he added, "But holly will continue 
to promote good will and cheer among peoples every- 
where, just as it has for centuries past." 



November-December, 1962 



w 




No words are necessary to describe this ingenious Homecoming float. 




The 1962 Homecoming Queen is escorted by (left) Roland L. Harrison, '96, member of the first football team to represent 
the University, and (right) Harry E. Hasslinger, '33, new President of the Alumni Association. 

6 The Maryland Magazine 



t 




Better' 



IDeLCerthingg 

For better kinq. 
' i nrough Chemistry 



■M 



Homecoming 
Victory 

by Dave Brigham 

HOMECOMING WAS A TERRIFIC SUCCESS! THE EN- 
thusiasm, the attendance, the football team and 
the weather combined to provide a completely 
victorious day. Broadway could not have staged 
a better production as the Terrapins turned defeat into 
victory with a field goal in the closing seconds of a grueling 
exhibition. 

Nearly 600 returned for an informal buffet luncheon at 
the main dining hall. A similar number enjoyed a Coffee 
Hour and Reception following the game. 

The post-game Reception was the first affair in the new 
ballroom of the Student Union Addition. Attendance was 
the largest for any such function in recent years, and the 
host club, representing Prince George's County, provided 
excellent hospitality under the direction of their President, 
Dr. John Cronin. Both the Alumni President, Harry E. 
Hasslinger, and the University President, Dr. Wilson H. 
Elkins, were on hand to greet and visit with the returning 
alumni. President Hasslinger and Mr. Roland L. Harrison 
escorted the Homecoming Queen around the Stadium Oval 
at half-time. Mr. Harrison was halfback on the first foot- 
ball team to represent the College. It was Maryland Agri- 
cultural College at that time. Dr. Elkins crowned Queen 
Bunny Little. 

Other honored alumni joining in the day's festivities 
included former football great, Granville Lewis, Class of 
'97, Dr. Thomas B. Symons, '02, Dr. Edgar Friedenwald, 
'03, Thomas Mullendore, '04. Among the younger alumni 
were J. J. Graham, '06, Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, and 
Genl. Lindsay McD. Silvester, '11. 

After a full day, some of the more hardy took part in 
the Homecoming Dance at the Armory in the evening. 
House decorations, a fine float parade, and open house on 
the part of fraternities and sororities made the day com- 
plete for an estimated six to eight thousand of the faithful 
who came home for Homecoming. 




President Elkins crowns the Homecoming Queen, 

Bunny Little, Alpha Omicron Pi. 




President Elkins visits with alumni during 
the pre-game luncheon. 

Alumni post-game coffee 'n cake get-together. 




November-December, 1962 



;ri'." 7 g' pa i ^' — -" l *H.,'.iq 



^W rT r? 




A Reference Library for Alumni 

Compiled by 
HOWARD ROVELSTAD, Doctor 0/ Libraries 

AND 

ROBERT M. PIERSON, #<?ad 0/ the Humanities Room, McKeldin Library 



IN ONE YEAR, 1961, THERE WERE PUBLISHED IN THE 
United States 18,060 books; this total includes 
neither the thousands of publications emanating from 
state and Federal governments nor subscription 
books. The number of books published in this country 
yearly is steadily increasing: the 1961 output represents 
an increase of 9% over the 1960 output. 

To select from such vast numbers the titles that you 
may want to read might be an impossible task except 
that there are many aids available to assist you in the 
process of selection. Book reviews and bibliographies in 
newspapers and magazines are obvious sources of infor- 
mation to which you may turn. Readers' advisers on the 
stall's of public libraries are prepared to help you. The 
problem remains, however, of selecting the comparatively 
few books which you may actually wish to purchase in 
order to have at hand, whenever you want them, the books 
which you need to consult frequently. 

The bibliography which follows is a list of reference 
books in print (and thus readily obtainable at or through 
your local bookstore) that altogether occupy three and 
one half feet of shelf space. From the accumulation of 
thousands upon thousands of books in print these have 
been selected as a basic group of books that could be ex- 
pected to answer most questions for which you would 
turn to books for answers. 

A reference book is, as you know, not the sort of book 
that you would expect to read from cover to cover; it is 
rather a book that you would turn to in order to find an 
answer to a specific question. But no hard and fast line 
should be drawn. Many people, for example, have read 



the Bible cover to cover; some enjoy reading encyclopedic 
articles for general edification and enlightenment; and 
others with a philological bent are fascinated by browsing 
through dictionaries. 

But generally one consults books on his reference shelf 
to find specific bits of information or brief articles about 
particular subjects. A small reference collection should 
not be expected to be all things to all people, but it should 
provide for the basic informational needs of the entire 
household. The children in the upper grades and in high 
school will benefit greatly by having such sources of in- 
formation within reach when they are doing their home- 
work; alumni may find a wealth of material, ranging from 
solutions to child care problems to statements as to the 
membership of religious bodies in the United States. 

Our list of volumes consists of items which we think 
will be helpful in an imaginary "average well-educated" 
home. But we should not expect every reader to accept 
our list in toto: the needs of each will vary more or less 
from those of others. With this thought in mind we have 
at several points suggested possible substitutions. 

It is not enough, however, to accept a list of books (or 
draw up one's own list), buy the books, and shelve them 
where they can be readily found. A collection thus as- 
sembled may soon gather dust. Spend an hour or two with 
each book; sample its riches; speculate as to how it might 
help you (think of how you could have used it, had you 
had it before). Then, when the moment comes — tomorrow, 
next week, next month, or next year — when the book 
could help you, you will remember that you have a copy 
of it on your shelf. 



8 



The Maryland Magazine 



Columbia Encyclopedia in 
One Volume. 2d ed. Columbia 

University Press. $35.00. 

This one-volume encyclopedia is 
designed for quick, ready-reference 
use. The 70,000 articles are notably 
concise and fact-laden and, in general, 
cover the range of the larger encyclo- 
pedias. 

World Almanac, and Book 

OF FACTS, 1962. World-Telegram. 
$1.85 (paperbound $1.10). 

This popular American almanac 
contains much information, including 
statistics, on social, industrial, politi- 
cal, financial, religious, educational, 
and other matters. An index is con- 
veniently placed at the beginning of 
each annual issue. A similar work, 
somewhat different in arrangement, is 
Information Please. 

World Atlas, i ith ed. Goode, John 

Paul. Rand McNally. $9.95 (textbook 
ed. $7.50). 

Goode's atlas, while less detailed 
than some more ambitious — and more 
expensive — atlases, is quite adequate 
for most purposes. The material on 
map interpretation should be studied 
if one is to derive the fullest benefit 
from the use of this work. Many dis- 
tribution maps are included, showing 
resources and products. Coverage of 
the United States is particularly thor- 
ough. Various tables are appended, 
and a detailed index makes it possible 
to locate very quickly even the smaller 
physical features and political sub- 
divisions. 

Maryland Manual, 1961- 

1962. Maryland Hall of Records. 
$4.50 (paperbound $3.50). 

The Maryland Manual, pub- 
lished every two years, is an official 
publication of the State. It presents 
an up-to-date, concise description of 
the State government; a directory of 
state, county and municipal officers; 
copies of the Charter and the Consti- 
tution, and a map of Maryland; and 
much miscellaneous information about 
the State. 

U. S. Government Organiza- 
tion Manual 1962-63. u. s. 

Government Printing Office. $1.50. 

For alumni living in the Washing- 
ton area or associated with the Fed- 
eral government this manual is of spe- 
cial interest. It describes agencies in 
the legislative, judicial, and executive 



branches, as well as quasi-official 
agencies and some international or- 
ganizations. It is published annually. 

An Encyclopedia of World 

HISTORY. Rev. ed. Langer, William 
Leonard, ed. Houghton. $8.75 (text ed. 

$6.50). 

Langer's work is primarily a series 
of historical outlines with emphasis 
upon recent events. Use it in survey- 
ing developments, in cheeking se- 
quences, in compiling lists of rulers, 
popes, etc., in checking dates of 
events, and in discovering what oc- 
curred at particular points in history. 
By no means confined to the "West," 
it should be particularly helpful for 
its coverage of the "minor" coun- 
tries and of the periods which many 
histories of civilization neglect — e.g., 
the Byzantine Empire, central Africa 
before the nineteenth century, and the 
reigns of the later Mongolian em- 
perors. 

Webster's New Internation- 
al DICTIONARY. 3d ed. una- 
bridged. Merriam. Regular style with 
buff buckram. $47.50. 

A scholarly and up-to-date descrip- 
tion of the English language, the third 
edition of Webster's has been the 
subject of much debate. The chief 
problem is that it lacks the designa- 
tions as to acceptability in formal dis- 
course which students and others have 
found to be a useful feature of the 
earlier editions (for some readers, 
therefore, the second edition would 
be a more useful purchase). 

Those who have used unabridged 
dictionaries primarily to check spell- 
ings may not be aware of their riches. 
If you are one of these people, you 
should find an hour or so spent with 
your public library's copy of Web- 
ster's second or third an illuminating 
experience. If still not convinced, you 
might settle for a good "collegiate" 
dictionary, like Webster's New Col- 
legiate or Harper's American Col- 
lege Dictionary. 

New Roget's Thesaurus of 
the English Language in 
Dictionary Form. Rev. ed. 

Roget, Peter. Putnam. $4.50. 

This is a book of synonyms and 
antonyms arranged by subject. It is 
a valuable tool for the writer or for 
the person interested in words. The 
alphabetical index, comprising almost 
half the volume, is the key to the 
work. (Some readers may prefer 



\\ ebsti r's I)h iion ut\ oi Syno- 
nyms; its special feature is its ex 
planations of the subtle differences 
between apparently synonymous 

words. ) 

C'omi'i i 1 1 Secre i \kv's Hand- 
book. Dons. I Lilian and Bo 
Miller. Prentice-Hall, ss 95 (|cx , L .a. 

$4.45). 

Perhaps the best single at biter foi 
those small but vexing problems, such 
as where to place the semicolon, how 
to set up a letter of application, and 
how to address a letter to the Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

Familiar Quotations. 13th ed., 

completely rev. Bartlett, lohn. Little. 
$10.00. 

Books of quotations are a pleasure 
to browse through. Bartlett's — cer- 
tainly the best known and probably 
the most useful — arranges extracts 
according to their authors and in- 
cludes a "word index" which enables 
one to identify passages by looking 
up their important words. Another 
useful quotation book is by Burton 
Stevenson: it differs from Bartlett's 
in that it classifies its material under 
broad subject headings. 

HOLY BIBLE. Rev. Standard Version. 
Nelson. $9.00 (price varies depending 
on paper and binding). 

In choosing a Bible one should con- 
sider ( 1 ) which version is most ac- 
ceptable to his particular religious 
denomination, (2) which acceptable- 
version is most suited to his particular 
needs. For many, the King James, or 
Authorized, version will be best, be- 
cause it provides the text from which 
English-speaking people have for over 
three hundred years quoted. Among 
scholarly modern versions, the Re- 
vised Standard Version is, however, 
the one most likely to meet the needs 
of Protestant readers. 

The Reader's Encyclopedia. 

Benet. William Rose, ed. Crowell. $7.50. 

To those who have used it. The 
Reader's Encyclopedia is about as 
indispensable as any book can claim 
to be. Its contents are wonderfully 
varied. Brief articles are included on 
authors, books, and characters; on 
literary terms; and on persons, places, 
institutions, doctrines, etc.. often re- 
ferred to in literature and literary 
criticisms. Besides these are many sur- 
prising items — a list of those who 
have been called "the Just." a list of 



November-December, 1962 



intv. and an article on some 
ises (as in Yankee Doodle) 
of the terra "macaroni." 

Reader's Digest of Books. 

Rev. ed. Keller. Helen Rev Maemillan. 
W. 

This digest contains synopses of 
outstanding works of fiction and non- 
action, representing many countries 
and periods. Brief evaluations are 
often included, these provide clues as 
to the value of particular works and 
to their place in intellectual history. 
Notice that the "supplement" consti- 
tutes over a third of the volume. With- 
in each section synopses are arranged 
alphabetically by title. Author indexes 
to each section facilitate searches. 

Complete Works, i vol. ed. 

Shakespeare. William. Oxford. $4.50 
(text ed. $3.00). 

A complete Shakespeare has long 
been regarded as a necessity in the 
cultivated home. The edition cited is 
one of a number available. If there 
are children in the household, a com- 
plete edition of the Tales from 
Shakespeare of Charles and Mary 
Lamb would also be a wise purchase. 

Home Book of Modern Verse. 

2d ed. Stevenson, Burton Egbert, ed. 
Holt. $10.00. 

An extremely "inclusive" collec- 
tion, with selections not only from 
the major modern poets but also from 
many minor figures passed over in the 
average collection of Twentieth Cen- 
tury verse. The arrangement is by 
general subject — childhood, old age, 
love (in its various aspects), nature 
(also subdivided), and so on. This 
approach facilitates browsing and 
searches for poems according to sub- 
ject matter: for the convenience of 
those making other approaches, in- 
dexes are included which enable one 
to find poems of which he knows 
authors, titles, or opening lines. 

A similar collection is Stevenson's 
Home Book of Verse, of which the 
Home Book of Modern Verse may 
be considered a supplement. For many 
households, both works would consti- 
tute wise investments. 

Twentii iii Century Au- 

MIORS, ed. hy S. J. Kunitz and H. 
Haycraft II W. Wilson Co. $8.50 
(first suppl. SS.00). 

Longish articles on the major 
writers — American. English, Conti- 
nental, etc. — of the present century. 



Portraits are included and brief bibli- 
ographies are appended. In using this 
aid, keep two things in mind: (1) 
the "authors," far from being confined 
to writers of poetry, fiction, and 
drama, include many leading figures 
in philosophy, religion, history, social 
theory, and science; and (2) the sup- 
plementary volume brings more near- 
ly up-to-date many articles in the 
main volume and includes articles on 
many writers omitted from the main 
volume. 

Art Through the Ages. 4th 

ed. Gardner, Helen. Harcourt. $9.50 
(text ed. $7.25). 

An excellent illustrated history, 
covering not only painting and sculp- 
ture but also architecture and the so- 
called minor arts. The art forms of 
each major period are treated sepa- 
rately, with helpful summaries inter- 
spersed. A bibliography, a glossary, 
and an index contribute, as do the 
summaries, to making this a book for 
reference as well as for reading. 

International Cyclopedia 
of Music and Musicians, 

ed. by Oscar Thompson. 8th ed. Dodd. 
$25.00. 

The tremendous public interest in 
stereo and hi-fi as well as in actual 
performance (in choirs, bands, and 
the like — and in circles of friends 
equipped with recorders) makes ref- 
erence works on music of particular 
interest. Thompson's cyclopedia is 
very broad in scope: it describes 
works, tells of composers' and per- 
formers' lives, explains musical terms, 
and discusses theory. Separate sec- 
tions are included on plots of operas, 
on pronunciation, and on musical bib- 
liography. The long articles on major 
topics are particularly noteworthy. 

Van Nostrand's Scientific 
Encyclopedia. 3d ed. van Nos- 

trand. $29.75. 

Brief articles (copiously illustrated 
with photographs, drawings, maps, 
tables, and charts) on a multitude of 
topics in the pure and applied sci- 
ences. The presentation is such as to 
render the work useful both to the 
beginner and to the advanced student. 
The arrangement is alphabetical. Par- 
ents who received their education fif- 
teen or more years ago may find that 
perusal of Van Nostrand will help 
them keep up with their children's 
scientific achievements! 



Modern Home Medical Ad- 
viser, ed. by Morris Fishbein, M.D. 
Rev. ed. Doubleday. $4.95. 

One school of thought opposes the 
widespread use of medical reference 
works; but surely the intelligent lay- 
man will not rely on this or any medi- 
cal reference work to the point that 
he neglects to consult a physician. 
The Modern Home Medical Ad- 
viser is an excellent source of infor- 
mation on a variety of medical topics 
ranging from descriptions of common 
syndromes through sickroom tech- 
niques to suggestions as to how to 
select a family doctor. A very copious 
index facilitates rapid finding of 
needed information. 

Your Child from 1 to 6. u. s. 

Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare. Government Printing Office. 
$.20. 

This authoritative pamphlet of al- 
most 100 pages covers the five years 
during which one develops faster than 
during any other five years of his life. 
This best seller of the Children's Bu- 
reau is one of six pamphlets published 
by the Bureau and available from the 
U. S. Government Printing Office, 
Washington 25, D. C, at $1.00 for 
the complete set: Prenatal Care, 
Infant Care, Your Well Baby, 
Your Child from 1 to 6, and The 
Adolescent in Your Family. 

Vogue. Book of Etiquette, a 
Complete Guide to Tradi- 
tional Forms and Modern 

USAGE, ed. by Millicent Fenwick. 
Simon and Schuster. $6.50. 

A reviewer in Time wrote, not very 
politely, that the Vogue etiquette 
book "makes Emily Post look like an 
aborigine." Not all will feel that Mrs. 
Fenwick altogether overshadows 
Emily Post and Amy Vanderbilt. Still, 
her book is a competent and remark- 
ably complete treatment of its sub- 
ject. 

New Complete Hoyle; an 
Encyclopedia of Rules, 
Procedures, Manners and 
Strategy of Games Played 
with Cards, Dice Coun- 
ters, Boards, Words, and 

NUMBERS. Rev. ed. Frey, Richard 
L.. ed. Doubleday. $3.95. 

An unrivalled work, with a self- 
explanatory title. Other Hoyle's are 
available, from various publishers; the 
prospective buyer should compare so 

Continued on Inside Bock Cover 



JO 



The Maryland Magazine 




C. E. TUTTLE 



C. E. TuTTLE, Baltimore industrialist and financier, 
died on October 6 at the age of 78, following a long 
illness. Preceding his hospitalization in Portland last April, 
Mr. Tuttle had been residing at his ranch in Prairie City, 
Oregon, where he was recuperating from surgery. 

His home in Maryland was Caves Valley Farm in 
Garrison. 

Mr. Tuttle was appointed in 1953 to a nine-year term 
as a member of the Board of Regents of the University 
of Maryland. In this position he served as chairman of 
several committees and prior to his illness was devoting 
much of his time to committees on planning for the ex- 
pansion of the University. His interest in education was 
further served in obtaining for the University an experi- 
mental nuclear reactor, secured in 1961. He was also 
the Representative of the Board of Regents in connection 
with the University's Nuclear Program. 

Mr. Tuttle's activities ranged from cattle ranching to 
investment banking, and have been, of his own making, 
a record of continuous success. 

A native of Hastings, Minnesota, he attended the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota for a time, leaving in 1904 to begin 
his business career. 

In 1923, after having served in a number of positions, 
he became President and Chairman of the Board of Pitts- 
burgh Terminal Railroad and Coal Company. 

At this time he became interested in investment banking 
and, in particular, in the furthering of new industries. In 
1928 he became Vice President and a director of Payson 



and Company, a New York banking firm specializing in 
tne financing of such enterprises. 

He served in this capacity until 1936, when he became 
President and Chairman of the Board of the Rustless Iron 
and Steel Corporation. In 1929, this company, then in its 
infancy, was one of the enterprises which claimed his at- 
tention. Mr. Tuttle acquired a controlling interest in the 
company and assumed its management. In 1944, when he 
sold his interests to Armco Corporation and relinquished 
the management, the firm had become the largest single 
producer of stainless steel in the world. 

Mr. Tuttle became most active in the uranium field in 
1957, when he organized and became President of Jen, 
Inc., one of the largest uranium producers of the world. 

In addition to his many business enterprises, Mr. Tuttle 
was a member of Mr. Hoover's Special Advisory Com- 
mittee when Mr. Hoover was Secretary of Commerce, 
and was an active member in the Republican Party. His 
club memberships included the Maryland, Greenspring 
Valley, Elkridge and Elkridge-Harford Hunt clubs in 
Maryland, and clubs in New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh 
and Salt Lake City. Until 1952, Mr. Tuttle had been a 
Director and Voting Trustee of the Maryland Jockey Club. 
His hobbies included hunting, fishing, riding, and thing. 
He is said to have flown over 50,000 miles a year. 

Mr. Tuttle's wife, the former Amy Sterns o( Hastings. 
Minnesota, died in 1940. He is survived by his daughter. 
Mrs. James F. Colwill of Halcyon Farm in Lutherville, and 
by one grandson. 



November-December, 1962 



11 



The General Alumni Council 

school and college 
representatives: 

\l\lo Downey, '27 
Abram Z. Gottwals, '38 
II M. Carroll, 70 

ARTS & SCIENCES 

Joe Mathias. '35 
Jess Krajovic, '32 
Richard Bourne, '57 

NESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas E. Bourne, Jr. 
Chester W. Tawney, '31 
Jacob B. Sclar, '34 

DEM I I S T R V 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup, '32 
Dr. Edward D. Stone. Jr., '25 
Dr. George B. Clendenin, '29 

EDUCATION 

Edward S. Beach, Jr., '49 
Harry E. Hasslinger, '33 
Miss Dorothy Ordwein, '35 

. NGINEEEING 

Emmett T. Loane, '29 
Tracy Coleman, '35 
James A. Stapp, Jr., '47 

II O M i; ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Thompson Clarke, '42 
Mrs. Mary Ward Davis, '55 
Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '43 



Hon. W. Albert Menchine, '29 
Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, '29 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Arthur G. Siwinski, '31 
Dr. William H. Triplett, '11 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 

NURSING 

Mrs. E. Elizabeth Roth Hipp, '29 

Miss Doris Stevens, '51 

Mrs. Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48 

P II AR M AC V 



Hyman Davidov '20 
Samuel I. Raichlen '25 
Dr. Frank J. Slama '24 



EX OFEICIO MEMBERS: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 
David L. Brigham, A&S '38 

Director & Executive Secretary 
Victor Holm, A&S '57 

Field Secretary 
Past Presidents 
Dr. Arthur I. Bell, DDS '19 
(V. Koons, Engr. '29 
Talbot T. Speer, Agr. '17 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, MD '12 
Col. O. H. Saunders, Engr. '10 
J. Homer Remsberg, Agr. '18 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, LL.B. '33 
Joseph H. Deckman, Engr. '31 
Frank Block, Phar. '24 
Harry A. Boswell, Jr., BPA '42 
Mrs. Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, 

Nurs. '47; Edu. '51 
Dr. Reginald V. Truitt, A&S '14 



ALUMNI CLUli REPRESENTATIVES: 
Baltimore — John L. Lampc, A&S, '50 
"M" Club— George W. Kncpley, Edu., '39 
Montgomery County — Donald M. Boyd 
Pittsburgh — A. B. "Budd" Fisher, Eng '26 
Prince Cieorgcs County — 

Dr. John W. Cronin, DDS '36 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix, Agr. '36 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens. Agr. '19 
U. S. Department of Agriculture — 

William H. Evans, Agr. '26 
Washington County — 

( harles B. Huyett, A&S '53 



THE 




LUMNI DIARY 



Peace on Earth, Good Will to Men\ 

WE HAVE COME ONCE AGAIN TO THE BEND IN THE ROAD. ... A MOMENTARY 
pause between the yesterday and the tomorrow, the closing of an old 
year and the starting of a new. This is a time for reflection on assignments 
completed and tasks remaining. 

This is a pleasant bend for now we find the time in a festive mood for the 
ready smile, the warm handshake, the joyful wish and those great expressions 
of gladness and cheer for all. Messages travel through the mails, across the 
lips, over the wires, and in radiant faces! In prose, poetry and song we say, 
"Peace on Earth, Good Will to All Men!" 

For a fleeting moment we are certain that today there would be room in 
the Inn. There can be peace in the world. Men really are yearning to forget 
their differences, bury their prejudices and destroy their hate. This bend in 
the road is a thing of rare beauty. For the view behind is one of rich experi- 
ence and ahead lies the highway of hope in a New Year. 

The haunting thoughts of the past cannot dampen the desire of the strong 
to continue the journey. Out of the past come inspirational and commanding 
thoughts. The wise have said "It takes a strong man to be gentle, even though 
such strength is often costly." Another adds "Those who do not study history 
must experience it." There is also the continuing refrain "Be brave enough 
to know when you are afraid, and strong to know when you are weak." 

It is at this point that we hold out the admonition that to summarize one's 
own faults produces friends for the individual and his cause. To emphasize 
the shortcomings of others is to guarantee enemies. It is easy to ask why men 
so readily forget pledges, promises and becoming attitudes. All of us can recall 
the sincerity of wishes freely given at the bend in the road. Often they seem 
in retrospect as only idle thoughts which filtered through the last sands of 
a dying year. 

There are those who find the bend in the road a perfect place to be. Here 
they hesitate rather than take the step which would make them turn the corner. 
But this is no time to remain with the timid or the tired. 

The road of another year lies ahead and it must be travelled. We who 
said "Peace on Earth" also said "Happy New Year" and meant it. The view 
ahead is bright. Together we strive for a new and limitless frontier, the un- 
known for which we have prepared through years of formal and practical 
education. Surely we will falter through the storm, but we will be reassured 
by an education that breeds confidence, tolerance and a desire to provide 
for the needs of others. The one asset of the uneducated is brute force, a 
force that must be harnessed and restricted by the educated. 

In education lies faith, lies hope, lies understanding. Without it we are 
lost, and we dare not leave the security of the peaceful bend in the road. With 
it we can conquer all; we can bring peace to the world; hope to mankind; 
and freedom to unborn generations. 

At the bend in the road we stand together to pray and say "Peace on 
Earth, Good Will to Men." 



Sincerely, 




^C_^ 



David L. Brigham 
Alumni Secretary 



12 



The Maryland Magazine 






UNIVERSITY 


CALENDAR OF 


ACTIVITIES 




DECEMBER 


JANUARY 




FEBRUARY 




4 


Basketball, Georgetown, Away. 


3 


Christmas Recess Ends. 




1 


Basketball, 


(ieorge Washington. 


8 


Basketball, Duke, Away. 


5 


Basketball, South Carolina, 






Away. 










Home. 




4 


Basketball. 


Georgetown, Home. 


11 


Basketball, North Carolina 
State, Home. 


8 


Basketball, George Washington, 
Home. 


7 


Basketball. 

Away. 


North Carolina. 


15 


Basketball, Virginia, Away. 


12 


Basketball, Navy, Home. 




9 


Basketball. 


Clemson, Away. 


19 


Christmas Program, College 


14 


Basketball, North Carolina, 




1 1 


Basketball. 

Away. 

Basketball, 


South Carolina, 




Park. 




Home. 




14 


Wake Forest. Away. 


19 


Basketball, Wake Forest, Home. 


19 


Basketball, North Carolina 




16 


Basketball, 


Virginia. Home. 


21 


Christmas Recess Begins After 




State, Away. 




19 


Basketball. 


Duke, Home. 




Last Class. 


23 


Pre-Examination Study Day. 




23 


Basketball, 


Clemson. Home. 



Baltimore Convocation 

Two physicians, one a Pakistan states- 
man and the other an American re- 
searcher, received honorary degrees on 
October 24 at the Fall Convocation of 
the School of Medicine, in the audi- 
torium of the Health Sciences Library. 

Lieutenant General Wajid Ali Burki, 
Special Assistant to the President of 
Pakistan, received an honorary doctor 
of laws degree, and Dr. Joseph Edwin 
Smadel, Chief of the Laboratory of 
Virology and Rickettsiology of the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health's Division of 
Biologic Standards, received an honor- 
ary doctor of science degree. Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, President of the University, 
conferred the degrees. 

After introductory remarks by Presi- 
dent Elkins, Mr. Charles P. McCormick. 
Chairman of the Board of Regents, and 
Dr. William S. Stone, Dean of the 
School of Medicine, General Burki de- 
livered an address titled "World Medi- 
cine." 

An ophthalmologist. General Burki 
served as Pakistan's Minister of Health. 




L 


tl 


i*fe 






5 I 



Lieutenant General Wajid Ali Burki speaking at the Baltimore Convocation. 



Social Welfare, and Labor from 1958 
to early 1962. He has represented his 
country at Geneva conferences of the 
International Labor Organization and 



also at the Congress of International 
Military Medicine and Pharmacy in 
Belgrade and Opatija. 

(Continued on next page) 



November-December, 1962 



13 





Two awards were presented to dave brigham on the occa- 
sion of the seventh anniversary of the television program 
To Promote Good Will. In the photograph to the left Mr. 
Brigham, moderator of WBAL-TV 11 's award-winning pro- 
gram, accepts the certificate of distinguished Citizenship from 
Edmund C. Mester, Executive Assistant to the hon. j. 
miii ard tawes. Looking on is harry E. hasslinger. Presi- 
dent of the University Alumni Association. Presented at the 
conclusion of To Promote Good Will on October 28, the 
certificate read: "For service to the citizens of the State, con- 
sistent interest in the well-being of your fellow citizens as 
demonstrated by your outstanding activities in countless civic 
organizations, your exemplary leadership in The American 
Legion and your distinguished service to the University of 
Maryland, manifesting your ability and integrity and meriting 



our trust and great respect." The certificate was signed by 
J. Millard Tawes, Governor of the State of Maryland. 

Dave Brigham has been moderator of To Promote Good 
Will since its inception some seven years ago on Television 1 1 . 
To Promote Good Will is seen each Sunday at 6:30 p.m. 

The photograph to the right records another ceremony in 
which Station WBAL-TV presented life-sized Praying Hands 
to the four participants of this weekly, national, award- 
winning television presentation. Left to right are the reverend 
william kailer dunn, Chaplain of the College of Notre 
Dame, dave brigham, Moderator, reverend dr. Abraham 
shusterman, Rabbi of the Har Sinai Congregation, and 
reverend dr. Frederick w. helfer. Minister of the Chris- 
tian Temple of Baltimore. 



Baltimore Convocation 

(Continued from preceding page) 

He received his M.D. degree from 
St. Andrews University, Scotland in 
1919 and was commissioned into the 
Indian Medical Service in 1926. When 
Pakistan was established he was ap- 
pointed Deputy Director General of 
Medical Services of the Pakistan Army 
and in 1955 he advanced to Director 
( reneral. 

Genera] Burki has done much to im- 



prove medical education and community 
health conditions in Pakistan. He was 
instrumental in collaboration between 
the Government of Pakistan and the 
University of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine in establishing the International 
Center for Medical Research and Train- 
ing at the Institute of Hygiene in La- 
hore, Pakistan. 

Dr. Smadel has made many major 
contributions to the diagnosis, treatment, 
and prevention of rickettsial and viral 
diseases. An alumnus of the University 



of Pennsylvania, he received his medi- 
cal degree from Washington University 
School of Medicine, in St. Louis. His 
career of research in communicable 
diseases has included eight years at The 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Re- 
search, four years in the Army in World 
War II, 10 years at the Walter Reed 
Army Institute, and the past six years at 
the National Institutes of Health, where 
since I960 he has directed the Division 
of Biologic Standards' laboratory of 
(Continued on page 19) 



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The Maryland Magazine 



AMERICAS 

MUSICAL LIFE 

COMES OF AGE 



H 



" "J" "J^ERR WAGNER, YOU ARE THE SILAS G. PRATT OF EUROPE."* THUS SPOKE SILAS 

Gamaliel Pratt, American composer, to Richard Wagner on the occasion 
of a visit to Bayreuth in 1875. Pratt, a colorful Chicagoan more noted in 
the annals of American music for his energy and audacity than for his 
talent, was a man with ambition. It was his idea that by writing large symphonic 
works with titles such as Paul Revere's Ride, The Battle of Manila, and The Tri- 
umph of Columbus he could make himself the great American composer and pro- 
duce for the first time a tradition of art music in his native land. 



* Aaron Copland, Our New Music, Whittlesey House, N. Y., 
1941. 



by DR. H. BRYCE JORDAN, Professor of Music, who recently 
served as a member of the faculty at the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. 






November-December, 1962 15 



UNFORTUNATELY HE WAS NOT ABLE TO DO ANY- 
thing of the sort. His music, like most of that 
composed by Americans of his time — even by 
those of much greater talent than he — was but 
a pale imitation of what was being written in Europe. 
The reasons for this state of musical affairs were simple 
enough. Our young society, just beginning to be relieved 
of the toils of conquering a frontier, had not yet created 
the professional environment or the public atmosphere 
which would bring about artistic independence. Good 
music was European music, and to experience it one either 
imported it or travelled to the Continent, usually to 
Germany. 

Thus young Americans who wanted to be composers 
crossed the Atlantic in pursuit of their goal. From the 
middle of the century on, men such as John Knowles 
Paine (the first American whose music in the larger forms 
is still occasionally performed), George Whitefield Chad- 
wick, Arthur B. Whiting, and Horatio Parker went to Mu- 
nich, Berlin or Leipzig to acquire the skills which led to 
distinguished careers at home; and Edward MacDowell, 
perhaps the best American composer up to the time of 
his death in 1908, studied both in France and Germany. 
Some of this first generation of professional composers 
served as teachers of a second generation, most of whom 
were born around the turn of the century. As their elders 
had done, however, many of these younger men ultimately 
went abroad for advanced instruction in their art. But it 
was not to Germany that they turned. The First World 
War had changed the American attitude. "Before the war," 
Aaron Copland has noted, "it was taken for granted that 
'abroad' for composers meant Germany. But I belonged 
to the postwar generation, and so for me 'abroad' in- 
evitably meant Paris." 

So it was with other outstanding members of the second 
generation — Roy Harris, Walter Piston, and Virgil Thom- 
son, for example; and younger Americans of great talent 
such as Samuel Barber, William Schuman, and Elliott 
Carter soon followed suit. Almost without exception, these 
men went to Paris to work with the remarkable Nadia 
Boulanger, a woman who continues even today to train 
many young composers from the United States. It is sig- 
nificant, however, that Boulanger's American pupils bear 
no particular French, or even European, imprint. Those 
with the requisite talent have gone on to develop their own 
individual styles. 

Rome, too, has been a magnet for gifted Americans. 
Among others, Howard Hanson, Randall Thompson, and 
Roger Sessions worked there in the twenties under the 
auspices of the American Academy, beginning a tradition 
which continues to the present day. Like the Paris-trained 
group, these men have largely pursued their own ways 
of writing music. 

Beginning with Copland's generation, then, the hold of 
German romanticism was broken, and musical life in the 
United States began to reach for a maturity which it had 
not known before. 

Musical composition, however, was not the only aspect 
of musical life in the United States to be dominated by 
Europe until the twenties and thirties. The concert and 
operatic stages were similarly affected. Beginning in the 
1 840's, singers such as Jenny Lind and Henriette Sontag, 
and instrumentalists such as Sigismond Thalberg, Henri 
Vieuxtemps, and Ole Bull made triumphant and profitable 
tours of the country; and toward the end of the century, 
such personalities as Paderewski, Godowski, Hofmann, and 



Schumann-Heink were the principal musical attractions. 
Unquestionably the lack of great American singers, pian- 
ists, and violinists in those times may be explained in the 
same way as the lack of an environment favorable to com- 
posers. The country was young and had been concerned 
with the forging of the elements of national power rather 
than with the training of artists. 

While the situation began gradually to change in the 
present century (one thinks of the American singers Rosa 
Ponselle, Lawrence Tibbett, Mary Garden, and Emma 
Eames, for instance), the balance on the American con- 
cert and operatic stages was strongly in favor of the Euro- 
peans up to the beginning of the Second World War. 

To an even greater extent than the concert and operatic 
stages, however, the podiums of American orchestras and 
opera companies have been occupied by Europeans. The 
traditions of our orchestras for precise and artistic playing 
and for programming of high quality were first built by 
such Germ an- trained conductors as Karl Muck, who pre- 
sided over the Boston Symphony Orchestra for ten years 
beginning in 1906; Theodore Thomas, who contributed 
much to the increasing quality of the New York Phil- 
harmonic in the seventies and eighties, as well as to the 
newly founded Chicago orchestra from 1891 to 1905; 
and Thomas's successor, Frederick Stock, who held the 
Chicago podium from 1905 to 1942. But perhaps the 
dominant figure among conductors in the United States 
was the Italian Arturo Toscanini. He began his American 
career at the Metropolitan Opera in 1907, and later con- 
ducted the New York Philharmonic and the N.B.C. Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 



WORLD WAR II SEEMS TO HAVE BEEN THE GREAT 
dividing line in the history of American musical 
culture. As has been indicated, the ascendancy 
of European music, performers, and conduc- 
tors was continuous and, for all practical purposes, com- 
plete through the 1930's. In 1945, native musical activity 
in the United States began to burgeon in all directions. 

More American composers are now at work than ever 
before, and many of these men have received all or most 
of their professional education at home. Supported by foun- 
dations and by university teaching appointments, they 
are writing more music than can find performance under 
present conditions. Performances at home are increasing 
however, and our music is also finding an increasing audi- 
ence in Europe. In 1959, for example, sixty-four Amer- 
ican composers had about 650 foreign performances of 
their music. And the work of our elder statesmen — men 
such as Copland, Piston, and Sessions — while not yet 
staple fare on European concert programs, is well known 
there. The same can be said for the music of Barber, 
Schuman, and Carter. 

Our country is also producing performers and con- 
ductors who are able to take their places among the world's 
artists. Van Cliburn, while he is only one of many superb 
young performers, has become a symbol of the fact that 
the American has "arrived" on the international musical 
scene. In concert halls and opera houses the world over 
American performers are warmly received. It comes as a 
surprise to learn that the Zurich opera, for example, has 
seventeen Americans on its roster. 



16 



The Maryland Magazine 



While Europeans still preside over and contribute im- 
portantly to the stature of a number of our major orches- 
tras, the post-war period has seen native conductors take 
over a number of the best symphonic ensembles in the 
country. Thor Johnson ably directed the Cincinnati orches- 
tra for several years in the forties and fifties; Howard 
Mitchell has built a group of major dimension during his 
thirteen-year tenure as conductor of the National Sym- 
phony Orchestra; there are two Americans — Thomas 
Schippers and Lorin Maazel — on the conducting staff of 
the Metropolitan Opera; and the present musical director 
of the New York Philharmonic, the ebullient Mr. Bern- 
stein, not only continues the superb traditions of that 
orchestra, but also provides brilliant instruction in the 
art of music listening to millions of television viewers. 

Moreover, Americans control the musical destinies of 
orchestras away from the nation's largest population cen- 
ters. The professional orchestras of Atlanta, Rochester, 
Dallas, San Antonio, and Seattle have natives at their 
helms, as do dozens of excellent semi-professional groups 
in smaller cities. 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SIGNIFICANT MUSICAL Ac- 
tivity in the hinterlands of our country has perhaps 
been the most striking feature of our musical life 
since World War II. Representative of this new 
dimension of our culture is the fact that orchestras in 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Wichita Falls, Texas, have in 
recent years given world premiers of important composi- 
tions by internationally known composers. A work by 
Rolf Liebermann of Switzerland was first heard in Chat- 



tanooga, while one by Alan Hovhaness of the United 
States first saw performance in Wichita Falls. 

Further indication of the expanding musical horizons 
in what Mencken once called a "Sahara of the Bozart" 
may be seen in the dozens of cultural centers and concert 
halls which are being built across the country. While New 
York is getting its Lincoln Center, Houston is planning 
its six million dollar Center for the Performing Arts. 
Moreover, such widespread and once isolated places as 
Odessa, Texas, Laramie, Wyoming, and Gadsden, Ala- 
bama, are building centers for arts. These halls will not only 
house performances by internationally famous artists and 
groups; they also will provide a place where excellent 
local orchestras, opera companies, chamber ensembles, 
and soloists may contribute to a newly and vastly enriched 
cultural life. 

It is impossible to give a full explanation for our booming 
musical culture. Unquestionably, however, much of the 
force behind this "cultural revolution," as Jacques Barzun 
has called it, is economic. Money, usually channelled 
through some type of church or government subsidy, has 
been an important factor in vibrant musical environments 
wherever they have developed. Since neither of these kinds 
of support has ever existed to any extent in the United 
States, it has been necessary for our large-scale musical 
enterprises such as symphony orchestras and opera com- 
panies to depend upon box office receipts, endowments, 
and public contributions; and these have usually proven 
inadequate. Scarcely an orchestra or opera company ends 
its season without a deficit, which is usually made up by 
public-spirited patrons. 



Opening night at Philharmonic Hall, Lincoln Center for the performing arts. 




November-December, 1962 



17 



W^i 



.*#* 





.«• v 



«* 




Exterior persepective of the proposed national cultural center, 
Washington, D.C. 



Still another source of financial aid is what one writer 
has referred to as "Medici for Our Time" — the founda- 
tions. These organizations, created for the purpose of 
dispersing for good causes vast portions of the private 
fortunes accumulated from the profits of our country's 
industrial empires, have shown good judgment and great 
imagination in the manner in which they have encouraged 
musical activity. The Ford, Rockefeller, Fromm, Kous- 
sevitsky, Ditson, Coolidge, and Whittall Foundations, 
among others, have financed the commissioning of hun- 
dreds of new American works. The Rockefeller Founda- 
tion has provided hundreds of thousands of dollars to 
one of the so-called "minor" orchestras — the Louisville 
group — not only for the commissioning but also for the 
recording of new works by both American and foreign 
composers. The Ford Foundation pays the salaries of 
"composers in residence" in various public schools sys- 
tems. The Alice M. Ditson Fund subsidizes professional 
recordings of new works which are not commercially at- 
tractive. The list might go on and on. 

Another recently emergent and highly important facet 
of American musical life is found in the universities and 
colleges. While institutions such as Harvard and Yale, 
as well as two or three of the larger state universities, 
have for many years played important roles both in edu- 
cating musicians and in providing a source of musical 
activity, the conservatories trained most of our professional 
musicians prior to the Second World War. Since the war, 
however, university and college musical life has increased 
manyfold, particularly in the state-supported institutions. 
At least forty buildings have been built to house college 
and university musical activities and instruction since 1945. 
These facilities have in some cases cost as much as six 
million dollars. Musical faculties have been greatly in- 
creased, and now include many of the country's finest per- 




75 



formers and composers. At the University of Illinois, for 
example, the music faculty numbers more than sixty, in- 
cluding three nationally known composers and one of the 
country's best string quartets. 

The trend toward the university-based, professional 
chamber ensemble has been particularly striking in the 
last fifteen years. Typical of these groups, the members 
of which teach as well as provide a series of concerts on 
their respective campuses, are: the Lenox Quartet of 
Grinnell College; the Stanley Quartet of the University of 
Michigan; the Paganini Quartet of the University of Cali- 
fornia at Santa Barbara; the University of North Carolina 
String Quartet; the University of Alabama String Quartet; 
and the recently formed University Trio at the University 
of Maryland. 

Musical life in the United States is not yet Utopian, but 
it has achieved a level never before equalled in our history. 
It has for the most part ceased to depend for sustenance 
on the other great musical cultures of the world, and it 
has reached the point where it can exchange its music and 
its performers with those of other countries without fear 
of unfavorable comparison. 

While the increased stature of American music and 
musicians abroad should be a source of great pride to us 
all, there is a more fundamental indication of our growing 
musical maturity — the increasing refinement of public 
taste. It is not without significance that almost 11,000 
hours of concert music are programmed on our radio 
stations every week, that sales of serious music account 
for thirty-five to forty percent of the recording industry's 
total business, or that attendance at concerts will total 
more than thirty million this year. Such interest on the part 
of the public will always be the best indication that music 
is a vital part of our Nation's cultural life. 

The Maryland Magazine 






ALUMNI NOTES 

virology and rickettsiology. He has made 
important contributions to every disease 
problem that he has studied, including 
smallpox, influenza, encephalitis, polio- 
myelitis, and typhus lever. 

The fall convocation marked the 
150th anniversary of Davidge Hall, a 
center for the medical education of 
Maryland physicians since its opening 
in the fall of 1812. 



Baltimore Alumni Club 

The second annual oyster roast spon- 
sored by The University of Maryland 
Alumni Club of Greater Baltimore was 
held Nov. 16. Dr. William H. Triplett, 
Club Secretary-Treasurer, was Chair- 
man of the event. Assisting Dr. Triplett 
was Second Vice President, Arthur Van 
Reuth. 

In addition to the traditional Oyster 
Roast menu, entertainment was provided 
by the Club's members who organized 
impromptu quartets. The quartets 
judged best were awarded novel prizes. 
A substantial quantity of door prizes 
were distributed among all those present. 

Other officers of the club are John 
Lampe, President; Sam A. Goldstein, 
1st Vice President; and Dr. Edward 
Stone, 3rd Vice President. 



M Club Banquet to 
Honor Justice White 

The 12th annual M Club Banquet to 
honor outstanding athletes of The Uni- 
versity of Maryland and other notable 
contributors to the development and 
furtherance of sports activities will be 
held on Saturday night, December 8, in 
the Statler-Hilton's Presidential Ball- 
room, Washington, D. C. 

The formal announcement was made 
by Dr. E. Lawrence Smallwood, Presi- 
dent of the M Club. 

More than a dozen awards will be 
bestowed upon University standouts, 
both players and coaches, in practically 
all areas of sports endeavor. 

The M Club also names a coterie of 
former athletic stars to the State of 
Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame; it pre- 
sents a coveted Sports Achievement 
Award to a nationally-recognized pres- 
ent-day athlete; bestows Honorary M 
Club Memberships to a selected few; 
and names a "Distinguished Citizen" to 
receive its highest award. 

Dr. H. C. "Curly" Byrd, former Presi- 
dent of The University of Maryland, 
was named to receive last year's "Dis- 
tinguished Citizen" award. 

Banquet Chairman Robert P. De- 
Stefano (Class of '53), former Univer- 



sityof Maryland quarterback, announced 
that this year's recipient will be The 
Honorable Myron R. White. Associate 
Justice, Supreme Court of the United 

States. 

Popularly known as "Whizzer" White, 
Justice White was one of the great ath- 
letes o\ his time while an undergraduate 
at the University of Colorado. A star 
passer, punter and runner lor three sea- 
sons (1935-36-37). he led all major 
college backs in both scoring and rush- 
ing in his senior year, with 16 IDs, 23 
points after touchdown and one field 
goal, for a total of 122 points. 

He was named to his post as Supreme 
Court Justice in April of this year by 
President Kennedy. 

In addition to the M Club Honor. Jus- 
tice White on December 4 will become 
the first member of the Football Hall of 
Fame (he was elected in 1954) to re- 
ceive the National Football Founda- 
tion's Gold Medal Award for outstand- 
ing contributions to football. It will be 
presented at the Foundation's banquet 
in New York City. 

Tickets for the M Club Banquet may 
be obtained by writing to the M Club, 
Box 273, College Park, Maryland, or 
by calling George W. Knepley, STerl- 
ing 3-5225 (Washington, D. C. ). 



$174,021 Contributed to 
Fund 

A total of $174,021 was contributed this 
past year to the University of Maryland 
through The Greater University of 
Maryland Fund, the annual alumni giv- 
ing program. 

In the fifth annual report and honor 
roll of the Fund program, Chairman 
Albert E. Goldstein and National Can- 
vass Chairman Howard Filbert reported 
that 3,628 contributions were made to 
the University for its library projects, 
student-aid funds, special educational 
programs, research, and the Distin- 
guished Faculty Program. 

In the published report. Goldstein 
and Filbert said that "our sponsors have 
worked hard and alumni have responded 
in great numbers to provide new funds 
to help our school meet new responsi- 
bilities." 

Contributions in the recently-ended 
campaign fall into the following major 
categories: approximately $109, 000 for 
research and the Distinguished Faculty 
Program — funds under this program are 
used by faculty members for advanced 
degrees, research projects, special semi- 
nars and the like — approximately 
$33,000 for student-aid funds, and ap- 
proximately $28,500 for unrestricted 
purposes which will be allocated by the 
Board oi Regents among the Fund's 
projects. 




UNIQUE CAREER 

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vanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. You'll 
have at your disposal the finest 
company owned facilities, and 
you'll be associated with some of 
the nation's outstanding engineers 
and scientists. You'll be encour- 
aged to combine project work 
with pursuit of advanced degrees 
at Johns Hopkins University, the 
University of Maryland or 
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under our Continued Education 
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Call: 

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Through 
The 

Years 



We plan to present this feature 
"Through the Years" as a regular sec- 
tion of Maryland Magazine. Inso- 
far as possible current information 
concerning our Alumni will be con- 
tained in these columns. Those who 
served for many years as our school 
and college editors will still be provid- 
ing items for this section. Much news 
will be gleaned from Alumni History 
Records submitted to our members 
from time to time. This section will 
always welcome notes from our read- 
ers giving us word on the accom- 
plishments, activities, locations, and 
personal notes. We welcome your re- 
action and your assistance. It is our 
hope every reader will also be a re- 
porter. 



1895-1919 

Roland L. Harrison, Agr. '95, re- 
tired Senior Topographic Engineer for 
the U. S. Geol. Survey. Mr. Harrison is 
living in Arlington, Virginia, and was 
active at Homecoming this year. 

Mahlon N. Haines, Agr. '96, died 
October 31, 1962, at 87. Col. Haines 
was known as the "Shoe Wizard" of 
York, Pennsylvania. 

Charles William Zimmermann, 
ll.b. '96, of Baltimore, is retired as 
the clerk of the U. S. District Court of 
Maryland. 

Otto Schoenrich, ll.b. '97, has been 
a member of the law firm of Curtis, 
Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle in New 
York since 1916. Mr. Schoenrich spent 
several years as an advisor to various 
Latin American governmental agencies. 

Harry T. Welty, Agr. '97, has re- 
tired as Engineer of Structures for the 
New York Central Railroad. Mr. Welty 
also received degrees from the Case 
Institute of Technology. He is living in 
Bronxville, New York. 

Dr. John Henry Doyle, m.d. 02. 
has retired from the practice of medi- 
cine and is living in North Dighton, 
Mass. Dr. Doyle also studied medicine 
at the University of Vienna. 

Luther E. Mackall, a&s '02, ll.b. 
'05, of New York City has retired. 

Dr. J. A. McMurdo, d.d.s. '02, is 
retired from the practice of dentistry 
and is living in Prince Edward Island. 
Canada. 



20 



The Maryland Magazine 



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Dr. C. Melvin Coon, md. '03, is 
still engaged in the general practice ol 
medicine in Milan. Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Ai fred N. Moore, m.d. '03, is 
practicing medicine in Oakland, Illinois. 

D. EDWARD Brown, Agr. '04. is re- 
tired alter nearK 45 years with the 
U. S. Department oi Agriculture. Mr. 
Broun was the Principal Scientific Aid 
in charge of the Tobacco Experiment 
Station at Upper Marlboro until his re- 
tirement in 1949. 

Dr. Frederick W. Gettier, d.d.s. 
'04. of Baltimore, is a practicing dentist. 
Dr. Gettier specialized in prosthesis at 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

Wn i iam Leslie Prout, i i ,b. '04, 
retired from the practice of law in 1959. 
Mr. Prout practiced law for over forty 
years in Baltimore where he still resides. 

Dr. Karl P. Heintz, dd.s. '05, is liv- 
ing in semi-retirement in Cumberland 
after practicing dentistry for 56 years. 

Dr. Orel Nathan Chaffee, m.d. 
'06, is a physician in Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Dr. Chaffee has been President of the 
County Medical Society. 

Dr. Frank J. Broschart, m.d. 'II, 
retired as Chief Radiologist for Mont- 
gomery General Hospital in 1962 after 
33 years. Dr. Broschart is residing in 
Gaithersburg, Maryland, and is still en- 
gaged in general practice. 

Dr. Howard E. Harman, m.d. '11, 
is retired from the practice of medicine. 
Dr. Harman is living in Chillicothe, 
Ohio. 

Dr. Edward H. Benson, m.d. '16, 
of Kingsville, Maryland is retired from 
practicing medicine. 

Dr. Israel J. Feinglos, m.d. '16, is 
in general practice in Baltimore. 

Dr. Herbert L. Shinn, m.d. '17, of 
Matthews, Virginia is engaged in the 
general practice of medicine. 

Daniel E. Smith, ll.b. '17. retired 
in 1961 as the Chief Legal Member of 
the Board of Veterans Appeals of the 
Veterans Administration. Mr. Smith is 
living in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Lang W. Anderson, m.d. '18, is 
retired from the position of Chief of 
Urology at Wilmington General Hospi- 
tal. Dr. Anderson has published several 
works in the field of Urology. He is liv- 
ing in Williston, South Carolina. 

George W. Norris. Agr. '19, is re- 
tired as a teacher and County Agent. 
He boasts four children, 14 grandchil- 
dren and two great-grandchildren as 
well as four prize ribbons for his spare- 
time oil paintings. 

1920-1929 

Bessie Maston Arnurius. Nurs. '20, 
of Towson, Maryland, was an Industrial 
Nurse for the B&O RR for nearly 35 
years. Mrs. Arnurius keeps tabs on the 
roster of the Nurses Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. 

(Continued on next page) 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT. MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
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Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



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alumni oJ. the 

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ATTENTION STUDENTS 
BOOKS FOR SALE 

Order your current text books, ref- 
erence books, etc., etc., from a whole- 
sale house direct. Hard cover or 
paper back. New or slightly used. 
The largest selection in the market 
on all subjects. Catalog sent on re- 
quest. Send 25c coin or stamps for 
handling and postage. (Deductible 
from first order.) Prompt service. 
Midwest Book Center, 7635 N. 
Paulina St., Chicago 26, Illinois. 



November-December, 1962 



21 




Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 

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Complete Line of 

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BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. at B & O R.R. OL 4-1616 

BETHESDA, MD. 



Dr. Nathan J. Davidov, m.d. '20, 
is in general practice and on the staff 
of two Baltimore hospitals. Dr. Davidov 
is a former Instructor at the University 
Medical School. 

Dr. W. K. McGill, m.d. '20, is prac- 
ticing medicine and residing in Clover, 
South Carolina. 

Dr. Hanson T. Perkins, A&S '20, 
is now retired in Washington, D. C, 
after serving 33 years with the Federal 
government. He was the Chief Medical 
Officer of the Veterans Administration 
Medical Service. 

James E. Dingman, Engr. '21, is the 
Executive Vice President of American 
Tel. and Tel. Mr. Dingman was award- 
ed an Honorary Doctor of Engineering 
degree from the University in 1960. 
He was most instrumental in the Telstar 
project and is living in Summit, New 
Jersey. 

W. Clayton Jester, Sr., Agr. '21, 
of Biglerville, Pennsylvania, is retired 
after serving as a County Agent and Ad- 
ministrative Officer with the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

Joseph G. Reading, Engr. '21, of 
Gastonia, North Carolina, is the Exec- 
utive Vice President and Vice Chairman 
of the Board of the First Union National 
Bank of North Carolina. 

Dr. Solomon Sherman, m.d. '21, is 
a practicing physician in Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

A. W. Hines, Engr. '22, is the Vice 
President and Treasurer of the Prescott 
Construction Company, Inc. of Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mr. Hines has served with 
the North Carolina State Highway Com- 
mission and the U. S. Bureau of Indian 
Affairs. He lives in Gaithersburg, Mary- 
land. 

Herbert D. Gilbert, A&S '22, has 
recently retired after 40 years with the 
Raybestos-Manhattan Company as a 
chemist and sales engineer. Mr. Gilbert 
is living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Herbert Gordon, m.d. '22, is 
practicing medicine. He resides in 
Arverne, L.I., New York. 

Dr. Louis Noll, m.d. '22, is a prac- 
ticing physician in Irvington, New 
Jersey. 

Mason C. Albrittain, Engr. '23, is 
the Vice President and General Sales 
Manager of the Baltimore Gas and Elec- 
tric Company. He is living in Baltimore. 

Morris J. Baldwin, Engr. '23, of 
Erie, Pennsylvania, is Senior Engineer 
for the General Electric Company in 
Erie. Mr. Baldwin has been an electrical 
engineer with G. E. since leaving school. 

John Mahshall Neel, (ll.b.) '23, is 
in the legal profession. Mr. Neel lives 
in Baltimore. 

Dr. Albert L. Anderson, m.d. '24, 
is a general surgeon in private practice 
living in Annapolis. 

Robert E. Coughi.an, Jr., ll.b. '24, 
is the senior partner in a Baltimore law 
firm. Mr. Coughlan has written two 
books on Workman's Compensation. 



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these famous franks to whole- 
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sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
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order your favorite 

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just call 
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22 



The 



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Dr. Marcus H. Greifinger, m.d. 
'24, is living in Newark, New Jersey. 
Dr. Greifinger is a surgeon. 

Dr. Isadore Pachtman, m.d. '24, is 
an ophthalmologist. Dr. Pachtman lives 
in Pittsburgh. 

Hon. Joseph L. Carter, i i .b. '25, of 
Baltimore is an Associate Judge of the 
Supreme Bench of Baltimore City. 

Dr. Jacob L. Dreskin, m.d. '25, is a 
practicing proctologist living in Newark, 
New Jersey. In addition to his other 
duties. Dr. Dreskin is the Medical Direc- 
tor for Bamberger's New Jersey Depart- 
ment Stores. 

Edward F. Juska, A&S '25. is a 
counselor at law. Mr. Juska is living in 
Long Branch. New Jersey. 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. Wii son, m.d. 
'25, live in Piedmont, West Virginia. Dr. 
Wilson is a physician. Mrs. Wilson, the 
former Marie Davis, is a graduate of 
the School of Nursing, 1924. Two 
daughters, Joanne and Rosemary, are 
also alumnae of the University. 

Dr. Paul Eanet, m.d. '26, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, is a practicing physician. 
His son, Lawrence J. Eanet, m.d., is 
completing his residency in perinatology. 

F. Harold Lewis, Pharm. '26, is a 
pharmacist at Shures Drug Store. Mr. 
Lewis lives in Baltimore and is a prolific 
poet. 

Clater W. Smith, ll.b. '26, is the 
senior partner in the law firm of Smith, 
Somerville and Case. Mr. Smith lives in 
Baltimore. 

William E. Trail, d.d.s. '26, is prac- 
ticing dentistry half-time in Lisbon. 
Maryland. In addition to practicing den- 
tistry for 34 years, Dr. Trail found time 
to operate two farms. He is Chairman 
of the American College of Dentists. 

William P. Beatty, Educ. '27, is a 
history teacher and Athletic Director 
living in Long Branch, New Jersey. Mr. 
Beatty has two children. His son Paul 
is a senior at the University. 

A. E. Coakley, Pharm. '27, is the 
Washington representative of Pfizer 
Laboratories. Mr. Coakley lives in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Dr. Brice M. Dorsey, d.d.s. '27, is 
a professor and Department Head of the 
Department of Oral Surgery of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Dental School. Dr. 
Dorsey lives in Annapolis. He has writ- 
ten numerous articles in the field of den- 
tistry and belongs to many dental socie- 
ties. 

Rev. Cecil Loy Propst, A&S '27, is 
Pastor of Epiphany Lutheran Church in 
Alexandria, Virginia. Rev. Propst stud- 
ied theology at Capital University. He 
was an Army Chaplain from 1940 to 
1945. He then became an Air Force 
Chaplain and retired as a Colonel in 
1960. 

Dr. G. H. Dana, d.d.s. '28, is a 
practicing dentist. Dr. Dana lives in 
Chestertown, Maryland. 

(Continued on next page) 



Bacon for ^ 
breakfast*! 




Albert F. Goetze, Inc. 

CHOICER MEATS 

Baltimore, Md. 




Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



N 






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Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



McLeod & Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

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ENVELOPE CORPORATION 



JjaUimore $ 1 ioneer Onvelope ^rianufaclurer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 1500 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 5, D. C. 234-3979 



November-December, 1962 



23 



SALES 




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Specialists in Residential and 
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Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

"Year Round Comfort in Your Home and Office" 
CALL US FOR THE NAME OF YOUR NEAREST DEALER 

YORK WHOLESALERS, Inc. 



(Wholesale Distributor) 
501 - 15th ST., SOUTH 



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RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



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vows 






.SINCE 



1933 



PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR 

RAILINGS 
For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



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MEATS • POULTRY 



Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels. 

Institutions, Ships 

Clubs. Etc. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

I! = « 1 1 I Ml. i re -W Ms hi Hi; I "II Itull h'\ II r<l 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Mines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phones GRanite 4-fi!>i;f> 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

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SELF-SERVICE 
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DINNER Quality Coffee 5c o cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 

11th Street Entrance of 

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NA 88140 



Pharm. '29, of 
is the President 



Dr. I. B. Golboro, d.d.s. '28, is the 
President of the Southern Galvanizing 
Company. Dr. Golboro lives in Pikes- 
ville, Maryland. 

Elmer H. Rehberger. Engr. '28, 
lives in Alexandria, Virginia and is a 
Highway Planning Engineer for the U. 
S. Bureau of Public Roads. 

Dr. David B. Silverman, d.d.s. '28, 
is practicing dentistry in Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia. Two of Dr. Silverman's three 
children have attended the University. 

Isador M. Cohen, Pharm. '29, is the 
Assistant Manager of the Citizens Loan 
Company. He is residing in Huntington, 
West Virginia. 

George C. Oland, A&S '29, is a com- 
pany vice president and chemist. He 
lives in Caldwell. New Jersey. 

Dr. Paul Arlington Reeder. m.d. 
'29, is engaged in the general practice of 
medicine. He is living in Barnesville. 
Ohio. 

Benjamin Striner, 
Silver Spring, Maryland 
of Striner Enterprises. 



1930-1939 



Wiiiiam L. Hopkins, BPA '30, of 
Fair Haven, New Jersey, is the Interna- 
tional Sales Manager of the Bendix Cor- 
poration. Hoppy has three sons: William 
L., Jr., graduated from Maryland in 
1961. John M. is in the Air Force, and 
Robert L. is attending Maryland now. 

Dr. Irving Schein, d.d.s. '30, is a 
practicing dentist in East Orange, New 
Jersey. Dr. Schein has been an active 
officer in the Alumni Club of Greater 
New York, and has done a great deal of 
work on mouth guards for contact 
sports. 

Dr. Aaron Seth Werner, m.d. '30, 
of Brooklyn, New York, is a practicing 
physician and surgeon. Dr. Werner has 
three children. Edward C. Werner is a 
fourth year student at Maryland. 

W. Lester Brunnett, Pharm. '31, 
is a pharmacist and store manager at 
the Metro Riverdale Pharmacy. Mr. 
Brunnett lives in Hyattsville, Maryland. 

Dr. Simon Duckman, A&S '31, of 
Rockaway Park, New York, is a prac- 
ticing physician. He received his medical 
degree from Columbia and is currently 
the Director of the Department of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology of the Brooklyn 
Hospital. 

Dr. Soi Rosen, m.d. '35, A&S '31, 
is a practicing physician. He lives in 
Millville, New Jersey. 

G. E. Taylor. Engr. '31, is a civil 
engineer associate. Mr. Taylor is living 
in Severna Park. Maryland. 

Dr. Samuel H. Bryant, d.d.s. '32, is 
a dentist in Baltimore. Dr. Bryant did 
his undergraduate work at Western 
Maryland. He has been active in Alumni 
work and served for several years on 
the Alumni Council. 



24 



The Maryland Magazine 



Dr. Joseph D. Giti in, d.d.s. '32, is 
living in New London, Conn. Dr. Ciitlin 
is a practicing dentist, and his son Paul 
is a member of the Class of 1966, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Margaret Bowen Rose, A&S 32, 
Nurs. '36, is a staff nurse at I. eland 
Memorial Hospital in Riverdale, Mary- 
land. Miss Rose was an Army Nurse 
during World War II. 

Dr. Sydney H. Shapiro, A&S '32, 
m.d. '35, is a practicing physician. He 
is living in Irvington, New Jersey. 

Dr. M. Marvin Cohen, m.d. '35, is 
practicing medicine. A resident of Pater- 
son, New Jersey, his son, Stephen, is a 
senior in the University's School of Med- 
icine, and his daughter, Marjorie, is a 
freshman at College Park. 

Fred V. Grau, Agr. '33, of College 
Park, Maryland, is the owner of Grass- 
lyn as well as a consultant for the 
Hercules Powder Company. Dr. Grau 
received his ph.d. in Ecology in 1935. 

Mrs. Andrew Kovat, m.a. '33, the 
former Katherine Arends. is a teacher 
at Gordon Jr. High School in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Mrs. Kovat did her under- 
graduate work at George Washington 
University. She is living in Hyattsville, 
Maryland. 

Paul Alexander Willhide, Educ. 
'33, retired in 1961 after 46 years with 
the Department of Education, Baltimore. 
He was the Principal of the Vocational 
Jr. High School. He is living in Balti- 
more. 

Rolfe L. Allen, A&S '34, is the 
Educational Adviser to the Deputy Chief 
of Staff for Military Operations, De- 
partment of the Army. Dr. Allen re- 
ceived his m.a. in 1935 and his ph.d. 
in 1937 from the University. He has 
written various works in the field of mili- 
tary education and training. 

Dr. L. W. Bimestefer, d.d.s. '34, is 
a practicing dentist. He is living in 
Baltimore. 

Dr. Morris Rosen, m.d. '34, is a 
physician specializing in ophthalmology. 
He resides in Philadelphia. Dr. Rosen 
has two children. 

Jacob B. Sclar, BPA '34, is a self- 
employed business analyst and consult- 
ant. A resident of Silver Spring, Mary- 
land, Mr. Sclar is also a member of the 
Alumni Council. 

Dr. Samuel Diener, m.d. '34, is 
practicing medicine. Dr. Diener also re- 
ceived his degree in pharmacy from the 
University of Maryland in 1930. He 
lives in Washington. His daughter, Mrs. 
Ina Sue Applestein, graduated from the 
University in 1960. 

Dr. Casimir F. Golubiewski, d.d.s. 
'35, is in the general practice of dent- 
istry, Dr. Golubiewski lives in Bayonne, 
New Jersey, and has two children. 

Dr. Arthur Jordon, d.d.s. '35, is a 
practicing dentist. He lives in Cranston, 
Rhode Island, and has three children. 
(Continued on next page) 



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Phone: FEderal 7-7038 

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King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratogo 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2. MD. 



FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 

PHYSICIANS DENTISTS NURSES 

MAIDS WAITRESSES BEAUTICIANS 

— Stores Located — 

235 PARK AVE. 123 W. FREE MASON ST. 

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1120 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



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November-December, 1962 



25 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGN 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 

CO 5-3300 




SALES • INSURANCE 

Near University of Maryland 

WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE. MD. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24. Md. 



Robert A. Peck, A&S '35, is the 
President of Bob Peck. Chevrolet. Mr. 
Peck lives in Arlington. Virginia. 

Herbert H. Rosenbaum, A&S '35, 
of Baltimore, is a practicing lawyer. He 
received his law degree from Harvard 
and has been a judge of the Traffic 
Court of Baltimore. 

Dr. James L. Corthouts. d.d.s. '36. 
is the proprietor of Corthouts' Dental 
Parlors. Dr. Corthouts lives in Hartford. 
Conn. He is a Past Grand Knight. K. of 
C, and the father of eight children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur I. Duvai.l, 
Educ. '36, A&S '45. are living in Silver 
Spring. Md. Mrs. Duvall is the former 
Mary Angela Aiello. Mr. Duvall is a 
physicist with the U. S. Bureau of Mines. 
They have four children. 

Dr. Samuel Steinberg, m.d. '36, is 
a practicing physician in Philadelphia. 
Dr. Steinberg has three children. Daugh- 
ter Carolyn is a chemistry major at the 
University of Maryland, Class of 1966. 

William Wilson Williams. A&S 
'36, of New York City, is the Manager 
of Technical Development of the Gen- 
eral Aniline and Film Corporation. Dr. 
Williams received his ph.d. from Illinois 
in 1939 and has over 40 patents to his 
credit. 

Dr. Harry Aks, d.d.s. '37, is a prac- 
ticing dentist. Dr. Aks lives in Arling- 
ton, Virginia, and has three children. 

Dr. Simon G. Markos, d.d.s. '37, is 
a practicing dentist in Dover, New 
Hampshire. Dr. Markos has three chil- 
dren and is the past Mayor of Dover. 
He is the President-elect of the New 
Hampshire Dental Society. 

Dr. and Mrs. Elton Resnick, m.d. 
'37, Pharm. '37, are living in Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. Dr. Resnick is a physi- 
cian, and Mrs. Resnick. the former Ruth 
Weisberg, has given up pharmacy for 
three children. 

Dr. Jack Shobin, d.d.s. '37, is a prac- 
ticing dentist. Dr. Shobin has three 
children and lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. Milton B. Asbell, d.d.s. '38, 
is a practicing dentist specializing in 
orthodontics. Among his many offices, 
Dr. Asbell has been the historian for 
the University of Maryland Dental 
School. He has two children and lives 
in Camden, New Jersey. 

Malcolm Coli.ison, Engr. '38, is a 
Consulting Mechanical Engineer and 
Assistant Mechanical and Construction 
Superintendent. He lives in Flin Flon, 
Manitoba, Canada, with his wife and 
two daughters. 

Frank S. Pucklls, Pharm. '38, is a 
pharmacist at the Greenway Pharmacy 
in Baltimore. Mr. Pucklis has three chil- 
dren and is active in the Pharmacy 
Alumni Association. 

Col. John Logan Schutz, Agr. '38. 
is Chief of Staff, Headquarters Corps. 
Fort Hayes. Columbus. Ohio. Col. 
SchutZ received his m.s. in 1940. He has 
three children. 



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26 



The Maryland Magazine 



Van S. Ashmun, Engr. '39, is the 
owner of the Eagle Company, Inc. Mr. 
Ashmun has four children and lives in 
Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Samuel B. McFari .ane, A&S '39, a 
chemistry major, is the Vice President 
for Research and Development for the 
Sun Chemical Corporation of New 
York. Mr. McFarlane lives in Summit. 
New Jersey, with his wife and three 
daughters. 

George E. Seei ey, Engr. '39, is the 
Vice President of the Branford Wire & 
Manufacturing Company of North 
Haven, Conn. Mr. Seeley lives in 
Cheshire, Conn. 



1940-1949 

Edward J. Dougherty, Agr. '40, is 
an Associate Engineer with the Mary- 
land State Roads Commission. Mr. 
Dougherty lives in Baltimore. 

Harry G. Gallagher, Engr. '40, is 
a Project Engineer with Bigelow-San- 
ford, Inc., of Thompsonville, Conn. Mr. 
Gallagher has two children and lives in 
SufHeld, Conn. 

Thomas H. Hedrick, ll.b. '40, is an 
attorney at law in Baltimore. Mr. Hen- 
drick has served in the Maryland House 
of Delegates from 1955 to 1962. 

Dr. William R. Platt, m.d. '40, is 
a pathologist at the Missouri Baptist 
Hospital and an Assistant Professor of 
Pathology at Washington University. Dr. 
Platt lives in St. Louis and has three 
children. He has been a prolific writer 
in the field of medicine. 

Herbert O. Aburn, Jr., Engr. '41, is 
an Aeronautical Engineer for the Bureau 
of Naval Weapons of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of the Navy. Mr. Aburn lives in 
Arlington with his wife and daughter. 

Dr. Charles Phelps Barnett, m.d. 
'41, is an Associate Pathologist at the 
Geisinger Medical Center. Dr. Barnett 
has five children and lives in Danville, 
Pa. 

Col. Carl A. Sachs, Agr. '41, is a 
Marine Corps Officer serving on the 
faculty of the Armed Forces Staff Col- 
lege. Col. Sachs has three children and 
lives in Norfolk, Virginia. His son Carl, 
Jr., is attending the University of Mary- 
land. 

Dr. Lester A. Wall, Jr., md.. '41, is 
a practicing physician. Dr. Wall has 
three children and lives in Baltimore. 

Dr. Joseph G. Bird, m.d. '42, ph.d. 
'49, is the Director of Clinical Pharma- 
cology. He also received his ph.d. in 
pharmacology from the University of 
Maryland in 1949. Dr. Bird has taught 
at the University School of Medicine 
and is living in East Greenbush, New 
York. He has three children. 

Maxwell B. Fleek, A&S '42, is the 

Headquarters Buyer for the Central 

Purchasing Department of the Celanese 

Corporation of America in Charlotte, 

(Continued on next page) 



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North Carolina. Mr. Fleek has two sons 
and lives in Rock Hill, South Carolina. 

Dr. Loy M. Zimmerman, m.d. '42, 
A&S '39, is a practicing physician. He 
lives with his wife and five children in 
Baltimore. 

Dr. P. Edward Capalbo, d.d.s. '43, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Capalbo lives 
in Westerly, Rhode Island. He has three 
children. 

Howard L. Keller, Engr. '43, is a 
Consulting Engineer and owner of H. 
L. Keller and Associates. Mr. Keller 
lives in Hyattsville, Maryland, with his 
wife and two sons. 

Dr. Albert A. Reitman, d.d.s. '43, 
is a practicing dentist specializing in 
orthodontics. Dr. Reitman has three 
children and lives in Garden City, New 
York. 

Nathan Schwartz, Pharm. '43, is the 
President of Nat-Lee Enterprises, Inc. 
Mr. Schwartz lives in Annapolis with 
his wife and two children. 

Dr. Arnold H. Castaline, d.d.s. '44, 
is a practicing dentist in Dorchester, 
Mass. Dr. Castaline has two sons. 

Dr. Theodore Gorfine, d.d.s. '44, is 
a practicing dentist in Cambridge, Mass. 
Dr. Gorfine has written articles for 
Denial Survey. 

Dr. A. David Schwartz, m.d. '44, 
is a surgeon living in Spring Valley, 
New York. Dr. Schwartz has four chil- 
dren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip W. Brewer, 
Engr. '45, H.Ec. '46, live in Silver 
Spring, Maryland, with their two chil- 
dren. Mrs. Brewer is the former Eliza- 
beth M. Wynn. Mr. Brewer is a Radio- 
logical Safety Engineer in the Nuclear 
Power Division of the Bureau of Yards 
and Docks. 

Mrs. Lester Ellin, Educ. '45, the 
former Carol Bernstein, is a housewife 
in Baltimore. Mrs. Ellin has two chil- 
dren. 

Mrs. H. Elizabeth B. Shank, A&S 
'45, the former Elizabeth Brown, is the 
owner and manager of the George W. 
Brown Insurance Agency in Cumber- 
land, Maryland. 

Dr. James L. Trone, Jr., d.d.s. '45, 
is a practicing dentist. Dr. Trone lives 
in Havre de Grace, Maryland, with his 
wife and five children. 

Martha Lovell Adams, m.s. A&S 
"52, is a research Analytical Chemist at 
the Aberdeen Proving Ground. Miss 
Adams did her undergraduate work at 
William and Mary. 

Dr. Alvin Liftig, d.d.s. '46, is a 
practicing dentist in Avon, Conn., where 
he lives with his wife and two sons. Dr. 
Liftig is an avid amateur radio ham. 

Dr. Jerome D. Nataro, m.d. '46, is 
a physician in Syosset, New York. Dr. 
Nataro is a ear, nose and throat special- 
ist. He has four children. 

Eva M. Popp, Nurs. '46, is engaged 
in private duty nursing. Miss Popp lives 
in Baltimore. 



28 



The Maryland Magazine 



Dr. James P. Cin i . d.d.s. '47, prac- 
tices dentistry in Warwick. Rhode 
Island. Dr. Gill has tour children. 

Mrs. Mildred W. Going, A&S '47. 
the former Mildred Wikek, is an Asso- 
ciate Mathematician at the Johns Hop- 
kins Applied Physics Lab. Mrs. Going 
received her m.a. from the University 
in 1949. 

Robert F. Schmidt, Educ. '47, is the 
Principal at the Alicia Grassland Junior- 
Senior High School. Mr. Schmidt re- 
ceived his m.ed. from the University in 
1950. He lives in Baltimore and has two 
daughters. 

Jacqueline Gouge, Educ. '48, is the 
Assistant Chief of Publications for the 
Department of the Interior. Miss Gouge 
lives in Mt. Rainier, Maryland. 

Charles H. Riddle, Jr., Engr. '48, 
is a self-employed engineer. Mr. Riddle 
has two children and lives in Kensing- 
ton, Md. 

Mrs. Hortense B. Tegler, Nurs. 
'48, the former J. Hortense Bunting, 
is a private duty nurse and part-time 
school nurse. Mrs. Tegler has four chil- 
dren and lives in Towson, Maryland. 

Lewis G. Cook, BPA '49, is the As- 
sistant Manager of Ernst & Ernst. Mr. 
Cook lives in Baltimore and has two 
sons. 

Frederick S. DeMarr, A&S '49, is 
the Dean of Students at C. W. Post 
College in Greenvale, New York. Mr. 
DeMarr served as Assistant Dean for 
Student Life at the University of Mary- 
land for several years. He received his 
m.a. from the University in 1954. 

Marjorie J. Sprague, Educ. '49, is a 
Guidance Counselor at Central Regional 
High School in Bayville, New Jersey. 
Miss Sprague received her m.ed. from 
Rutgers in 1959. 

Dr. Russell M. Tilley, Jr., m.d. 
'49, is engaged in the general practice of 
medicine. Dr. Tilley has two children 
and lives in Washington, D. C. 



1950-1959 

Carl J. Bender, Jr., A&S '50, is a 
Position Classification Specialist at Fort 
Detrick in Frederick, Maryland. Mr. 
Bender lives in Hagerstown, Maryland. 

Dr. Robert B. Doty, A&S '50, is an 
Instructor in Microbiology at Penn 
State. Dr. Doty received his ph.d. from 
Penn State in 1962. He lives in Hatboro, 
Pennsylvania, with his wife and two 
children. 

George R. Quick, Engr. '50. is a 
Section Head for Navigation Systems, 
Flight Simulators of ACF Industries. 
Mr. Quick has two daughters and lives 
in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Paul E. Reising, BPA '50, is a Super- 
visory Accountant at the Goddard Space 
Flight Center. Mr. Reising has four sons 
and lives in West Hyattsville. 

(Continued on next page) 



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Dr. W. Howard Yeager, m.d. '50, 
A&S '44, is a practicing physician as 
well as a surgeon for the Board of Police 
and Fire Surgeons of the D. C. Govern- 
ment. Dr. Yeager is living in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Mrs. Arthur H. Fogelman, A&S 
'51, the former Juanita J. Block, is a 
housewife in Chevy Chase. Mrs. Fogel- 
man has two children. 

Dr. Robert Coburn Kingsbury, 
m.d. '53, A&S '51, is a practicing physi- 
cian. Dr. Kingsbury lives in Seaford, 
Delaware, and has five children. 

Dr. Frank Robert Perilla, m.d. 
'51, A&S '47, is the Chief of The De- 
partment of Radiology at St. Agnes Hos- 
pital in Baltimore. Dr. Perilla is also an 
Instructor in Radiology at Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital. He has four children and 
lives in Baltimore. 

Mrs. Margaret Galloway Van 
Doren, H.Ec '51, is a housewife in 
Ridgewood, New Jersey. Mrs. Van 
Doren has two sons. Mrs. Van Doren 
is very active in the College Club of 
Ridgewood. 

Edward L. Wolffe, Engr. '51, is a 
chemical engineer. Mr. Wolffe lives in 
Furlong, Pennsylvania, and has three 
sons. He received his M.S. from Drexel 
Institute in 1959. 

Joseph Henry Bourdon, III, Engr. 
'52, is an Assistant Project Engineer for 
the consulting firm of Whitman, 
Requardt & Associates. Mr. Bourdon 
has four children and lives in Baltimore. 
He has been very active in working with 
underprivileged children with the Balti- 
more J.A.C. 

Dr. Robert Donald Carlough, 
d.d.s. '52, is a practicing dentist. Dr. 
Carlough is residing in Concord, North 
Carolina. He has three sons. 

Dr. Raymond W. Palmer, Jr., d.d.s. 
'56, A&S '52, is a practicing dentist spe- 
cializing in orthodontics. Dr. Palmer has 
two children and lives in Glen Burnie. 
Maryland. 

Stanley Stelmach, Engr. '52, is an 
Instrument Engineer living in Baltimore. 
Mr. Stelmach has two children. 

Charles L. Chrest, Jr., BPA '53, is 
a self-employed C.P.A. Mr. Chrest lives 
in Baltimore with his wife and three 
children. 

Capt. Melville E. Eaton, Jr., Engr. 
'53, is a U. S. Air Force Officer. Capt. 
Eaton is stationed at Wright-Patterson 
A.F.B. in Ohio. 

Frederick Swartz, A&S '53. is a 
sales representative for Philip Morris, 
Inc. Mr. Swartz has three children and 
lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Michael Tymoch, A&S '53, is an 
Analyst for the Ford Motor Company. 
Mr. Tymoch lives in Mahwah, New 
Jersey. 

Claud A. Ai sop, BPA '54, is a Pro- 
gram Evaluation Analyst for the Agency 
for International Development. He re- 
ceived his m.a. from George Washington 
University in 1959. Mr. Alsop and his 



30 



The Maryland Magazine 



wife live in Carrollton, Hyattsville, 
where he is serving a term as Council- 
man. 

Edward Arthur Burnap, Jr., Engr. 
"54, is a construction supervisor for 
Lucius White, Chance & White, Archi- 
tects. Mr. Burnap lives in Baltimore and 
has two sons. 

Dr. Sanford Paskow, d.d.s. '54, is 
a practicing dentist. Dr. Paskow lives 
with his wife and three children in 
Colonia, New Jersey. 

Lt. Col. Peter Thomas Sadow, 
Mil.Sci. '54, is a Research Associate of 
the Defense Management Center at Ohio 
State University. He has one son and 
lives in Dayton, Ohio. Col. Sadow re- 
tired in 1959 after serving 28 years in 
the U. S. Air Force. 

Ci are Whitely Bangs, m.ed. '55. 
is a teacher and reading specialist. She 
has three children and lives in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

Amelia Catakis, H.Ec. '55, is the 
Chief Dietitian at the Washington Hos- 
pital Center. Miss Catakis lives in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and is very active in the 
Home Economics Alumnae Board of 
the University of Maryland. 

Charles Jay Ceska, Jr.. BPA '55, is 
a Supervisory Auditor for the U. S. 
Army Audit Agency. Mr. Ceska and his 
wife live in Baltimore. 

Margaret Adell Dunn, Educ. '56, 
is the Administrative Supervisor at The 
Clinical Center of the National Institutes 
of Health in Bethesda. Miss Dunn lives 
in Hyattsville and is currently working 
part-time toward her ed.d. at the Uni- 
versity. 

Hermann Jacob, m.s. '56, is a gov- 
ernment employee. Mr. Jacob and his 
wife are living in Springfield, Virginia. 

Dr. Irvin P. Pollack, m.d. '56, is a 
practicing physician specializing in oph- 
thalmology. He is also an instructor of 
ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Dr. Pollack lives in Baltimore 
and has two children. 

Major Eugene P. Reeder, U.C. '56, 
is an officer in the U. S. Air Force. 
Major Reeder has two children and lives 
in Bellevue, Nebraska. 

Dr. Harvey R. Butt, Jr., A&S '57, 
is an Anesthesiologist at Anne Arundel 
General Hospital in Annapolis. Dr. Butt 
has two children. He has written several 
articles and is an avid sailor. 

William C. Gierisch, U.C. '57, is an 
Intelligence Research Analyst with the 
U. S. Army Combat Developments Com- 
mand at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Col. 
Gierisch and his wife live in Arlington. 
Virginia. 

Alfred W. Liedtke, Educ. '57, is a 
Cartographic Draftsman. Col. Liedtke 
retired from the Army in 1954 after 25 
years of service. He received his M.S. 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 
1958. He has three children and lives 
in Aberdeen, Maryland. 



Ma./or Stephen Sedora, Mil. Sci. 
'57, has been in the Marine Corps since 
1940. He is a systems analyst for Elec- 
tronic Data Processing. Major Sedora 
and his wife live in Arlington, Virginia. 

Alice Josephine Akehurst, Educ. 
'58. is the Director of Nursing Service 
of the Lutheran Hospital of Maryland. 
Miss Akehurst lives in Baltimore. 

Pali ie Marie BERRY, PL. '58. is a 
teacher of physical education at Takoma 
Park Junior High School. Miss Berry 
lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Kenneth Lantz Pierson, BPA '58. 
is a Mobilization Officer for the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. Mr. Pier- 
son has three children. He lives in Balti- 
more. 

Jacob Ray Ramsburg, Jr., BPA '58, 
is an insurance agent for Frederick Un- 
derwriters, Inc. Mr. Ramsburg has two 
children and lives in Frederick. Mary- 
land. 

Judith B. Arnoff, A&S '59, is a Clin- 
ical Audiologist at Highland View Hos- 
pital in Cleveland. Mrs. Arnoff is the 
former Judith Benner. She and her hus- 
band live in Cleveland. 

Lt. Col. Stanley J. Nixon, U. C. 
'59, is an officer in the U. S. Air Force. 
Col. Nixon has served in the Air Force 
since 1942. He has three children and 
lives at Boiling AFB in Washington. 

William Seymour Ornett, Engr. 
'59, is a Mechanical Engineer for the 
Federal Aviation Agency. He lives in 
Hyattsville. Mr. Ornett is studying for 
his m.s.e. at George Washington Univer- 
sity currently. 

Samuel C. Ramsdell, U.C. '59, 
MBA '62, is an accountant at the Aber- 
deen Proving Ground, Maryland. He 
has three children and lives in Bel Air, 
Maryland. 

THE SIXTIES 

Townsend D. Breeden, Engr. '60, 
is a Communications Engineer with the 
R.C.A. Space Center. Mr. Breeden and 
his wife live in Trenton, New Jersey. 

Lynne Judith Cashman, A&S '60, 
is a secretary in the office of the Ser- 
geant at Arms of the U. S. House of 
Representatives. Miss Cashman lives in 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne L. O'Roark, 
A&S '60, Nurs. '60, are living in Balti- 
more. Mr. O'Roark is studying dentistry 
at the University of Maryland Dental 
School. Mrs. O'Roark is the former 
Sara Rafter. 

Lt. Col. Gerald L. Pines, U.C. '60, 
is an officer in the United States Marine 
Corps. He is the Wing Adjutant of the 
2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. Col. Pines 
has served since 1934. He has two chil- 
dren and lives in Cherry Point, North 
Carolina. 

Elliott J. Alpher, A&S '61, is a 
second year student at the University 



oi Maryland Dental School. Mr. Alpher 
lives m Takoma Park. Maryland. 

inns Wayni Branch, A&S '61, is a 
student at George Washington Medical 

School. Mi. Branch lives in I akom.i 

Park. Maryland. 

Rl( HARD P. ( ii IDDING, BPA '61 . is a 

Budget Analyst trainee for the State ol 

Maryland. Mr. Gladding lives in Balti- 
more. 

Mil I \KI) A. N()A( K. Educ. '61, is an 

Industrial Arts Teacher at Beltsville 

Junior High School. Mr. Noack lives in 
Washington. I). C. 

Mrs. Virginia Sweeney Bai i akd. 
\i id. '62. teaches French, and is chair- 
man of the Department of Foreign I an- 
guages in Annapolis. Mrs. Ballard has 
one son and lives in Annapolis. 

(api. Edward J. Driscoi i . U.C. '>2. 

is an Administrative Officer in the Office 
of the U. S. Air Attache of the U. S. 
Embassy in Ottawa, Canada, (apt. 
Driscoll has been in the service since 
1940. He has two children and lives in 
Ottawa, Canada. 



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November-December, 1962 



31 



Some Recent Grants to the University 



For study on the feasibility of annex- 
ing to the Town of Elkstown sur- 
rounding unincorporated areas. 
Maryland State Planning De- 
partment and Municipal Techni- 
cal Advisory Service to College 
of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration 
$400. 

For research on turbulent transport 
coefficients. 

N \ i ional Science Foundation to 
Department of Chemical Engi- 
neering 
$33,300. 
* 

For research on hemolymph proteins 
in the molting cycle of insects. 
National Science Foundation to 
Department of Entomology 
$10,100. 



For evaluative study of undergraduate 

teacher education courses in human 

development. 

Grant Foundation to Institute 

for Child Study 

$3,800. 

For research on topological spaces 
and linear operators. 

National Science Foundation to 
Department of Mathematics 
$65,000. 

For study of scientific and technical 
manpower resources in space sciences 
and technology in the USSR — a pilot 
project. 

National Science Foundation to 
Department of Physics and 
Astronomy 

$23,700. 



Mahlon N. Haines 



Mahlon N. Haines, the shoe wizard 
from York, Pennsylvania, died at the 
age of 87 in early November. He was 
a member of the Class of 1896. As 
a student he won the Gold Medal for 
the best drill cadet and for much of 
his life provided an Annual Trophy 
to the Major of the winning ROTC 
Battalion at Maryland. The "Ken- 
tucky Colonel" served on the Alumni 
Council, the Agriculture Alumni 
Board, was Chairman of the Alumni 
Magazine Committee and gave the 
first $1,000 to establish the Chapel 
on the College Park Campus. His de- 
votion to the University was great and 
he gave much credit to the institution 
from which he received his education. 
He became a millionaire after ex- 
periencing several business failures. 

He owned the largest chain of shoe 
stores in America operated by an in- 
dividual. He was much interested in 
horses and owned many outstanding 
trotters and pacers. He had large agri- 
cultural holdings in both Pennsylvania 
and South Dakota. 

Colonel Haines never forgot his 
days as a shortstop on the Maryland 
baseball team, nor his obligation to 
his fellow man. He devoted much of 
his time and wealth to the Boy Scouts 
of America, who presented him with 
a Silver Antelope; to his community, 
to which he recently designated an 



extensive park area; to the Grand 
Lodge of the State of Pennsylvania 
where he had 65 years of service; and 
to the Methodist Church. His business 
was turned over to his employees upon 
his retirement. 

As a student and an alumnus, he 
was one of the most vibrant men the 
Campus has ever known and he will 
not soon be forgotten. His last letter 
told of his plan to return for another 
Homecoming — he said in part ". . . 
if you see any man down there older 
than 87 plus six months and physi- 
cally fit, who can run the quarter 
around the stadium, introduce me to 
him." He went on "It makes me sad 
when I think of all those classmates 
or students I used to know — it also 
makes you feel sort of alone in the 
world. But I am always doing some- 
thing to help. So I am still alive 
and living strong as usual." 

In 1949 the Colonel had a banquet 
for the Alumni Council which he pre- 
pared and served himself. He enter- 
tained more than 75 alumni leaders 
who were given an opportunity to re- 
view his six scrapbooks of clippings. 
The Alumni were also invited to try 
on the headgear which designated him 
an Honorary Chief of three Indian 
tribes. He has left a lasting impression 
which he would like to hope was 
typically MARYLAND. 



Directory of Advertisers 

Acme Iron Works 24 

Alcazar 21 

American Disinfectant Co. 2S 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 30 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 31 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 28 

Baltimore Envelope Co 20 

Bard Avon School 21 

Bergmann's Laundry 25 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 22 

Bon Ton Food Products 29 

Briggs Construction Co.. Inc 26 

Thomas E. Carroll & Son 21 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 30 

Victor Cusbwa & Sons 21 

D. C. Ignition Headquarters 25 

Del Haven White House Motel 24 

Embassy Dairy 30 

Emerson Hotel -•> 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 29 

J. H. Filbert Co 27 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 29 

Franklin Uniform Co 25 

Fuller & d' Albert, Inc 21 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 23 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 26 

Harvey Dairy 28 

Hotel Harrington 24 

The In Town Motor Hotels 20 

Kidwell & Kidwell. Inc 

King Bros., Inc 2S 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 

John D. Lucas Printing Company 

Lustine Chevrolet 21 

Maria's Restaurant 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 24 

Massey-Ferguson, Inc 28 

Midwest Book Center 21 

Modern Machinists Co 26 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 

North Washington Press, Inc 28 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 

Occidental Restaurant 

Oles Envelope Corp 

Ottenberg's Bakers, Inc. 

Park Transfer Co 31 

Poor, Bowen, Bartlett & Kennedy, Inc. 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 

Seidenspinner Realtor 26 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 27 

Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co 22 

Strayer College 26 

Student's Supply Store 26 

Sweetheart Bread 21 

Thomsson Steel Co.. Inc. 25 

Vermont Federal Savings & Loan Assn.. . 26 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 29 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. 27 

Westinghouse Electric Corp. 19 

Perry O. Wilkinson 26 

Williams Construction Company, Inc 30 

J. McKenny Willis & Sons, Inc 20 

York Building Products Co., Inc 20 

York Wholesalers, Inc 24 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 29 



32 



The Maryland Magazine 



A TURNING 
POINT .... 



NOVEMBER 29 MARKS THE FIFTI- 
eth anniversary of a great mile- 
stone in the history of the University 
of Maryland. On this date in 1912 
the Annual Thanksgiving Dance was 
in progress. In the midst of gaiety dis- 
aster struck the College. The word 
FIRE rang through the hall as a pre- 
lude to the destruction of two large 
dormitories, the dining rooms, busi- 
ness offices, and the classrooms for 
mathematics and languages. 

The Dance was at its height when 
fire was first discovered darting from 
the ceiling of a room on the top floor 
of the Administration Building. Danc- 
ers and chaperons rushed out of 
doors. Someone with presence of mind 
put in a call to the Baltimore Fire 
Department. Others made every effort 
to control the fire but in a short time 
discovered the water supply had 
failed. The Baltimore response was 
immediate. Fire equipment loaded on 
B & O flat cars rolled out of Baltimore 
toward College Park. When the equip- 
ment arrived, those who manned it 
found they had made a futile trip for 
there was no water with which to 
operate. Helplessly, students, faculty, 
firemen and neighbors watched two 
great buildings, the heart of the cam- 
pus, consumed by a great conflagra- 
tion and finally reduced to grim and 
gloomy ruins. With the buildings went 
the College records for the previous 
fifty years. The day before the fire, 
the College water tower had been 
drained in preparation for a painting. 

The outlook was bleak. It appeared 
the College would be compelled to 
suspend operations indefinitely. The 
students saved the day. Four days 
following the fire the entire student 




body, with one exception, reported 
back to the College with the firm in- 
tention of keeping the College in oper- 
ation. Sympathetic neighbors and fac- 
ulty members opened their homes to 
the boys of the "homeless" College 
and for the next two years kept them 
— and in the words of the students 
"kept them well." 

Following the fire, efforts were 
made to transplant the College to 
another location, based on arguments 
that the location at College Park was 
not favorable for a College, as it was 
too near the distracting influences of 
Washington City and yet located in 
a wilderness devoid of the refining 
influences so characteristic of a town 
or small city. Others pointed to the 
fact that the site was too hilly and 
rough for the erection of buildings 



in accordance with any system that 
would be pleasing or practical. Critics 
stated there was not sufficient level 
space for a parade ground or athletic 
field and that a model college farm 
on the present site was out of the 
question. 

But the sentiment of two genera- 
tions for the old College was too 
strong to be denied and all interests 
ultimately united to raise the school 
again upon the cinders of the old 
Maryland Agricultural College. 

In a half-century a great university 
has arisen from charred ruins. And 
perhaps it would be fitting for the 
University family today to pause and 
briefly recall the courage of those who 
returned to their college when it was 
destroyed to build it anew. For they 
will always be with us. 



Reference Books 

(Continued from page 10) 

as to be sure to get the one that best 
suits him. An indexed work is de- 
sirable. Hoyle is of course useful in 
settling disputes regarding rules; and 
an evening of browsing may reveal to 
you some sources of pleasure that you 
did not know of. How long has it been 
since you played panguingue, whist, 
loo, ombre, fan tan, snip snap snorem, 



and faro? The section on children's 
games may come in handy. 

Reference Books; a Brief 
Guide for Students and 
Other Users of the Li- 
brary. Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
Baltimore. 5th ed. $1.25. 

With this handy list we conclude 
our list. The Pratt Library pamphlet 
on reference books lists and describes 



several hundred aids, including gen- 
eral works (periodical indexes, en- 
cyclopedias, yearbooks, biographical 
compilations, dictionaries, atlases, 
etc.) and works on specific fields 
(literature, art, music, science, busi- 
ness, sports, education, etc.). An 
author and title index is included. This 
aid can serve as a bridge between 
one's own "look-it-up" shelf and the 
reference collections available to one 
in nearby libraries. 



Merry Christmas 

TO OUR FELLOW ALUMNI 

We 

who have the 

honor, the responsibility and 

the privilege of serving as your officers 

and your representatives, send most hearty wishes 

of the 
Season. May the 
tidings now exchanged in an 
atmosphere of good fellowship, under- 
standing and peace, be our beacon and inspiration 

through 

every day of the 

coming year. May you always 

feel that spirit of friendship and goodwill, 

best expressed in the Spirit of Christmas. While we 

continue 

to pray for peace 

for all Mankind, we express 

appreciation to a university through which 

we are sufficiently prepared to meet the challenges 

of our day. With complete assurance, 

we convey to each of you a complete wish for 

A HAPfY NEW YEAR 



I